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Notice of Nondiscrimination 

Smith College is committed to maintaining a 
diverse community in an atmosphere of mutual 
respect and appreciation of differences. 

Smith College does not discriminate in its 
educational and employment policies on the 
bases of race, color, creed, religion, national/ 
ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, or 
with regard to the bases outlined in the Veterans 
Readjustment Act and the Americans with 
Disabilities Act. 

Smith's admission policies and practices are 
guided by the same principle, concerning women 
applying to the undergraduate program and all 
applicants to the graduate programs. 

For more information, please contact the 
Office of Institutional Diversity, (413) 585-2141. 



Campus Security Act Report 

The annual Campus Security Act Report contains 
information regarding campus security and 
personal safety on the Smith College campus, 
educational programs available and certain crime 
statistics from the previous three years. Copies of 
the annual Campus Security Act Report are available 
from the Department of Public Safety, Neilson 
Library B/South, Smith College, Northampton, 
Massachusetts 01063. Please direct all questions 
regarding these matters to Sharon Rust, Director 
of Public Safety, at (413) 585-2490. 



SMITH COLLEGE BULLETIN 



(USPS 499-020) 
Number III 



Series 95 September 2002 



Printed monthly during January, April, September 
(two issues). Office of College Relations, Garrison 
Hall, Smith College, Northampton, Massachu- 
setts 01063. Periodical postage paid at 
Northampton, Massachusetts. Postmaster: send 
address changes to Smith College, Northampton, 
Massachusetts, 01063 

All announcements herein are subject to revision. 
Changes in the list of Officers of Administration 
and Instruction may be made subsequent to the 
date of publication. 

The course listings on pp. 69-396 are maintained 
by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty. 
For current information on courses offered at 
Smith, visit www.smith.edu/catalogue. 

22M3185-8/02 



Smith College 

Northampton, Massachusetts 01063 

(413) 584-2700 



SMITH COLLEGE BULLETIN 



2002-03 CATALOGUE 



Smith College 

Northampton, Massachusetts 01063 

(413) 584-2700 



Contents 



How to Get to Smith iv 

Inquiries and Visits v 

Academic Calendar vii 

The Mission of Smith College viii 

History of Smith College 1 

The Academic Program 7 

Smith: A Liberal Arts College 7 

The Curriculum 7 

The Major 8 

The Minor 9 

Student-Designed Interdepartmental Majors and Minors 9 

Five College Certificate Programs 9 

Advising 10 

Academic Honor System 10 

Special Programs 1 

Accelerated Course Program 1 

The Ada Comstock Scholars Program 1 

Community Auditing: Nonmatriculated Students 1 

Five College Interchange .' 1 

Departmental Honors Program 12 

Independent Study Projects/Internships 12 

Smith Scholars Program 12 

Study Abroad Programs 12 

Smith College Junior Year Abroad Programs 13 

Smith-Approved Study Abroad 15 

Off-Campus Study Programs in the U.S 15 

The Campus and Campus Life 17 

Facilities 17 

Student Residence Houses 20 

Intercollegiate Athletics, Intramurals and Club Sports 21 

Career Development 21 

Health Services 22 

Religious Expression 22 

The Student Body 24 

Summary of Enrollment 24 

Geographical Distribution of Students by Residence 25 

Majors 26 

Recognition for Academic Achievement 27 

Prizes and Awards 28 

Fellowships 32 

Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 33 

Your Student Account 33 

Fees 34 

Institutional Refund Policy 36 

Contractual Limitations 36 

Payment Plans and Loan Options 36 

Financial Aid 37 

Admission 41 

Secondary School Preparation 41 

Entrance Tests 41 



ii Contents 

Applying for Admission 42 

Advanced Placement 42 

First- Year Students' Admission Deadline Dates 43 

International Baccalaureate 43 

Interview 43 

Deferred Entrance 43 

Deferred Entrance for Medical Reasons 44 

Transfer Admission 44 

International Students 44 

Visiting Year Programs 44 

Readmission 45 

Ada Comstock Scholars Program 45 

Academic Rules and Procedures 46 

Requirements for the Degree 46 

Academic Credit 49 

Academic Standing 52 

The Age of Majority 53 

Leaves, Withdrawal and Readmission 53 

Graduate Study 55 

Admission 55 

Residence Requirements 56 

Leaves of Absence 56 

Degree Programs 56 

Nondegree Studies 60 

Housing and Personal Services 61 

Finances 61 

Financial Aid 61 

Changes in Course Registration 62 

Policy Regarding Completion of Required Course Work 62 

Courses of Study 64 

Deciphering Course Listings 66 

Afro-American Studies 69 

American Studies 76 

Ancient Studies 82 

Anthropology 83 

Archaeology 90 

Art '. 91 

Astronomy 104 

Biochemistry 108 

Biological Sciences 110 

Chemistry 123 

Classical Languages and Literatures 127 

Comparative Literature 131 

Computer Science 139 

Dance 142 

East Asian Languages and Literatures 15 

East Asian Studies 161 

Economics l6f 

Education and Child Study In 

Engineering 181 

English Language and Literature 18" 

Environmental Science and Policy 19? 






Contents iii 

Ethics 202 

Exercise and Sport Studies 203 

Film Studies 213 

First-Year Seminars 217 

Foreign Language Literature Courses in Translation 220 

French Studies 221 

Geology 229 

German Studies 234 

Government 240 

History 253 

Program in the History of Science and Technology 267 

International Relations 271 

Interterm Courses Offered for Credit 273 

Italian Language and Literature 274 

Jewish Studies 277 

Latin American and Latino/a Studies 280 

Logic 284 

Marine Sciences 286 

Mathematics 288 

Medieval Studies 294 

Music '. 297 

Neuroscience 305 

Philosophy 307 

Physics 314 

Political Economy 318 

Psychology 319 

Public Policy 328 

Religion and Biblical Literature 331 

Russian Language and Literature 338 

Science Courses for Beginning Students 341 

Sociology 342 

Spanish and Portuguese 348 

Theatre 357 

Third World Development Studies 364 

Urban Studies 366 

Women's Studies 367 

Interdepartmental and Extradepartmental Course Offerings 379 

Five College Course Offerings by Five College Faculty 382 

Five College Certificate in African Studies 388 

Five College Certificate in Asian/Pacific/American Studies 389 

Five College Certificate in Culture, Health and Science 392 

Five College Certificate in International Relations 393 

Five College Certificate in Latin American Studies 394 

Five College Certificate in Middle East Studies 395 

Five College Self-Instructional Language Program 396 

The Athletic Program 397 

Directory 399 

The Board of Trustees 399 

Faculty 400 

Administration 426 

Standing Committees 429 

Alumnae Association 430 

Index 431 

Class Schedule inside back cover 



1\ 



How to Get to Smith 



By Air: Bradley International, located about 35 
miles south of Northampton in Windsor Locks, 
Connecticut, is the nearest airport and is served by 
all major airlines. Limousines, buses and rental 
cars are available at the airport. Flying into Brad- 
ley rather than into Boston's Logan Airport gives 
you a shorter drive to Northampton and spares 
you city traffic congestion. 

By Train: Amtrak serves Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, which is 20 miles south of Northampton. 
From the train station, you can reach 
Northampton by taxi, rental car or bus. The 
Springfield bus station is a short walk from the 
train station. 



By Bus: Greyhound, Vermont Transit and Peter 
Pan bus lines serve the area. Most routes go to 
the main bus terminal in Springfield, where you 
can catch another bus to Northampton. Buses 
run almost hourly between Springfield and 
Northampton. Smith is a 10-minute walk or a 
short taxi ride from the bus station. 

By Car: Northampton is on Route 1-91. Take Exit 
18, and follow Route 5 north into the center of 
town. Turn left onto Route 9- Go straight through 
three sets of traffic lights, turning left into College 
Lane shortly after the third set. The Office of Ad- 
mission is on your right, overlooking Paradise 
Pond. Parking is available next to the office and 
along Route 9- 



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2. College Hall 

3. Office of Admission 

4. Northampton bus station 


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Smith College is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. Membership in the 
association indicates that the institution has been carefully evaluated and found to meet standards agreec 
upon by qualified educators. 



Inquiries and Visits 



Visitors are always welcome at the college. Student 
guides are available to all visitors for tours of the 
campus throughout the year by appointment, and 
arrangements can be made through the Office of 
Admission. Administrative offices are open Monday 
through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. during 
the academic year. (Refer to the college calendar, 
p. vii, for the dates that the college is in session.) 
In the summer, offices are open from 8 a.m. to 
4 p.m. You may be able to make appointments to 
meet with office staff at other times, including holi- 
days. Any questions about Smith College may be 
addressed to the following officers and their staffs 
by mail, telephone or interview. 

Admission 

Audrey Smith, Director of Admission 
7 College Lane, (413)585-2500 

We urge prospective students to make appoint- 
ments in advance with the Office of Admission 
for interviews and tours. The Office of Admission 
schedules appointments for interviews from 9 a.m. 
to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. From mid-Sep- 
tember through January, appointments can also be 
made on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to noon. General 
information sessions are also held twice daily and 
on Saturdays from mid-July through January. Please 
call the Office of Admission for specific times. 

Financial Aid, Campus Jobs and Billing 
for Undergraduates 

Linda Dagradi, Director of Student 

Financial Services 

College Hall 10 

(413) 585-2530, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 

(800) 221-2579, January 15-May 15 

E-mail: sfs@smith.edu 

Academic Standing 

Maureen A. Mahoney Dean of the College 
College Hall 21, (413) 585-4900 
Tom Riddell, Dean of the First-Year Class 
Margaret Bruzelius, Dean of the Sophomore and 

Junior Classes 
TBA, Dean of the Senior Class 
College Hall 23, (413)585-4910 



Ada Comstock Scholars Program 

Erika J. Laquer, Director 
College Hall 32, (413)585-3090 

Advancement 

Karin George, Vice President for Development 

and Chief Advancement Officer 
Alumnae House, (413) 585-2020 

Alumnae Association 

Carrie Staples Cadwell, Executive Director 
Alumnae House, (413) 585-2020 

Career Planning and Alumnae References 

Barbara Reinhold, Director of Career 

Development Office 
Drew Hall, (413)585-2570 

College Relations 

Ann Shanahan, Chief Public Affairs Officer 
Garrison Hall, (413)585-2170 

Graduate Study 

Patricia L. Sipe, Director 
College Hall 3, (413)585-3050 

Medical Services and Student Health 

Leslie R. Jaffe, College Physician and Director 

of Health Services 
Elizabeth Mason Infirmary, (413) 585-2800 

Religious Life 

Jennifer Walters, Dean of Religious Life 
Helen Hills Hills Chapel, (413) 585-2750 

School for Social Work 

Carolyn Jacobs, Acting Dean 
Lilly Hall, (413)585-7950 

Student Affairs 

Mela Dutka, Dean of Students 
College Hall 24, (413)585-4940 

Transcripts and Records 

Patricia O'Neil, Registrar 
College Hall 6, (413) 585-2550 



VI 1 



Academic Calendar, 2002-03 

The calendar for the academic year consists of two semesters separated by an interterm of approximately 
three weeks. Each semester allows for 13 weeks of classes followed by a pre-examination study period 
and a four-day examination period. Please visit www.smith.edu/admission/dates.html for further details. 

Fall Semester, 2002 

Saturday, August 31, 2002, 9 a.m.-A p.m. 

Central check-in for entering students 

Saturday, August 31-Wednesday. 
September 4 

Orientation for entering students 

Tuesday, September 3, 10 a.m. -4 p.m. 
Wednesday, September 4, 1-4 p.m. 

Central check-in for returning students 

I Wednesday, September 4, 7:30 p.m. 
Opening Convocation 



! Thursday, September 5, 8 a.m. 

Classes begin 

To be announced by the president 

Mountain Day (holiday) — Classes scheduled 
before 7 p.m. are canceled. 

Saturday, October 12-Tuesday, October 15 

Autumn recess 

Friday, October 18-Sunday, October 20 

Family Weekend 

Inauguration of Smith President Carol Christ 

Thursday, November 7 

Otelia Cromwell Day — Afternoon and evening 
classes are canceled. 

Monday, November 11-Friday, November 22 

Advising and course registration for the second 
semester 

Wednesday, November 27-Sunday, December 1 
Thanksgiving recess (Houses close at 10 a.m. on 
November 27 and open at 1 p.m. on December 1.) 

Thursday, December 12 

Last day of classes 

Friday, December 13-Monday, December 16 

Pre-examination study period 

Tuesday, December 17-Friday, December 20 

Midyear examinations 



Saturday, December 21-Sunday, January 5 

Winter recess (Houses and Friedman apartments 
close at 10 a.m. on December 21 and open at 
1 p.m. on January 5.) 

Interterm, 2003 

Monday, January 6-Saturday, January 25 

Spring Semester, 2003 

Thursday, January 23-Sunday, January 26 

Orientation for entering students 

Monday, January 27, 8 a.m. 

Classes begin 

Monday, January 27, 4:30 p.m. 

All-college meeting 

Wednesday, February 19 

Rally Day — All classes are canceled. 

Saturday, March 15-Sunday, March 23 

Spring recess (Houses close at 10 a.m. on March 
15 and open at 1 p.m. on March 23.) 

Monday, April 7-Friday. April 18 
Advising and course registration for the first 
semester of 2003-04 

Friday, May 2 

Last day of classes 

Saturday, May 3-Monday, May 5 

Pre-examination study period 

Tuesday, May 6-Friday, May 9 

Final examinations 

Saturday, May 10 

Houses close for all students except 03 graduates, 
Commencement workers and those with Five Col- 
lege finals after May 9- 

Sunday, May 18 

Commencement 

Monday, May 19 

All houses close at noon. 



Vlll 



The Mission of Smith College 

Smith College began more than 125 years ago in the mind and conscience of a New England 
woman. In her will, Sophia Smith expressed her vision of a liberal arts college for women, one 
equal to the best available to men, which would make it possible "to develop as fully as may be 
the powers of womanhood." By means of such a college, she wrote, women's '"wrongs' will be 
redressed, their wages adjusted, their weight of influence in reforming the evils of society will 
be greatly increased. . .their power for good incalculably enlarged." In this spirit Smith College seeks to 
provide the finest liberal arts education for women of diverse backgrounds, ages and outlooks who have 
the ability and promise to meet the demands of an academically rigorous curriculum. 

Today Smith College, as the largest liberal arts college for women, is well situated to fulfill its 
founder's wish to provide such "studies as coming times may develop or demand for the education of 
women." For its pursuit of the advancement of learning the college is endowed with exceptional re- 
sources and facilities, an outstanding faculty and a dedicated staff, and a rich international curriculum. 
Smith's overall educational purposes are furthered by a number of co-educational graduate programs, 
and by membership in the Five College Consortium, which offers all our students an abundance of aca- 
demic, cultural and social advantages. 

The Smith faculty has committed itself to two purposes, which it regards as fully complementary. It 
educates students, and it conducts research in the arts and sciences or engages in the performing or 
creative arts. The faculty believes that the best undergraduate education is to be fostered by offering a 
wide range of courses designed to develop students' analytic, creative and expressive powers. Stu- 
dents — advised by the faculty — plan programs of study suited to their individual talents and interests, 
and thereby share the responsibility for their own education. 

Smith students come from throughout the United States and more than 60 countries around the 
world. They bring to the college an array of talents that allows them to develop and hone intellectual 
discipline and the habits of inquiry, reflection and criticism necessary for success in their lives and ca- 
reers. In providing women with a liberal arts education, a broad range of co-curricular activities and a 
house residential system fostering self-reliance and self-governance, Smith endeavors to produce gradu- 
ates distinguished by their intellectual capabilities, their capacity for leadership, their ethical values and 
their readiness to contribute to the betterment of the world. Becoming alumnae, our graduates inspire 
new generations of students and enhance in many ways the life of the college. Altogether, the Smith com- 
munity — students, faculty, staff and alumnae — strives to be what its founder envisioned, "a perennial 
blessing to the country and the world." 



History of Smith College 

Smith College is a distinguished liberal arts college committed to providing the highest quality 
undergraduate education for women to enable them to develop their intellects and talents and 
to participate effectively and fully in society. 
The college began more than a hundred years ago in the mind and conscience of a New 
England woman. The sum of money used to buy the first land, erect the first buildings and begin 
the endowment was the bequest of Sophia Smith. When she inherited a large fortune at age 65, Sophia 
Smith decided, after much deliberation and advice, that leaving her inheritance to found a women's col- 
lege was the best way for her to fulfill the moral obligation she expressed so eloquently in her will: 

I hereby make the following provisions for the establishment and maintenance of an 
Institution for the higher education of young women, with the design to furnish for my 
own sex means and facilities for education equal to those which are afforded now in 
our colleges to young men. 

It is my opinion that by the higher and more thorough Christian education of 
women, what are called their "wrongs" will be redressed, their wages adjusted, their 
weight of influence in reforming the evils of society will be greatly increased, as teach- 
ers, as writers, as mothers, as members of society, their power for good will be incalcu- 
lably enlarged. 

The college envisioned by Sophia Smith and her minister, John M. Greene, resembled many other old 
New England colleges in its religious orientation, with all education at the college "pervaded by the Spirit 
of Evangelical Christian Religion" but "without giving preference to any sect or denomination." 

Smith has changed much since its founding in 1871. But throughout its history there have been cer- 
tain enduring constants: an uncompromising defense of academic and intellectual freedom, an attention 
to the relation between college education and the larger public issues of world order and human dignity, 
and a concern for the rights and privileges of women. 

Indeed, at a time when most people had narrow views of women's abilities and their proper role in 
society, Sophia Smith showed not only concern with the particular needs of young women but also faith 
in their still underdeveloped powers. After enumerating the subjects that continue to be a vital part of the 
college's curriculum, she added: 

And in such other studies as coming times may develop or demand for the educa- 
tion of women and the progress of the race, I would have the education suited to the 
mental and physical wants of women. It is not my design to render my sex any the less 
feminine, but to develop as fully as may be the powers of womanhood, and furnish 
women with the means of usefulness, happiness and honor now withheld from them. 

In the fall of 1875, Smith College opened with 14 students and six faculty under the presidency of 
Laurenus Clark Seelye. Its small campus was planned to make the college part of what John M. Greene 
called "the real practical life" of a New England town, rather than a sequestered academic preserve. 
College Hall, the Victorian Gothic administrative and classroom building, dominated the head of 
Northampton's Main Street. For study and worship, students used the town's well-endowed public library 
and various churches. Instead of a dormitory, students lived in a "cottage," where life was more familial 
than institutional. Thus began the "house" system that, with some modifications, the college still employs 
today. The main lines of Smith's founding educational policy, laid down in President Seelye 's inaugural 
address, remain valid today: then as now, the standards for admission were as high as those of the best 



Historv of Smith 



colleges for men; then as now, a truly liberal education was fostered by a broad curriculum of the hu- 
manities, the fine arts and the natural and social sciences. 

During the 35 years of President Seelye's administration, the college prospered mightily. Its assets 
grew from Sophia Smith's original bequest of about $400,000 to more than $3,000,000: its faculty to 
122; its student body to 1,635; its buildings to 35. These buildings included Alumnae Gymnasium, site of 
the first women's basketball game, which now houses the College Archives and is connected to the Will- 
iam Allan Neilson Library, one of the best-stocked undergraduate libraries in the country. 

Smith's second president, Marion LeRoy Burton, took office in 1910. President Burton, a graduate of 
Yale Divinity School, was a gifted public speaker with an especially acute business sense. He used these 
talents to help the college raise the amazing sum of $1,000,000 — a huge endowment campaign for any 
college at that time. With the college's increased endowment. President Burton was able to increase fac- 
ulty salaries substantially and improve the faculty-to-student ratio. President Burton's fund drive also 
invigorated the alumnae, bringing them closer to the college than ever before and increasing their repre- 
sentation on the board of trustees. 

Along with improving the financial state and business methods of the college, President Burton con- 
tributed to a revision of the curriculum and initiated college honors programs to recognize outstanding 
students. He also helped to organize a cooperative admission system among Smith, Mount Holyoke, 
Wellesley and Vassar, the finest women's colleges of the day. President Burton's accomplishments are 
commemorated today by Burton Hall, the science building that his fund drive helped to finance. 

Vtlien William Allan Neilson became president in 191", Smith was already one of the largest women's 
colleges in the world. President Neilson shrewdly developed the advantages of large academic institutions 
while maintaining the benefits of a small one. Under his leadership, the size of the faculty continued to 
increase while the number of students remained at about 2.000. The curriculum was revised to provide a 
pattern still followed in many American colleges — a broad foundation in various fields of knowledge, 
later complemented by the more intensive study of a major subject. The college expanded honors pro- 
grams and initiated interdepartmental majors in science, landscape architecture and theatre. The School 
for Social Work, a coeducational graduate program, was founded. And more college houses were built, 
mainly in the Georgian complex called "'the Quad," so that every student could five on campus. 

Not only did President Neilson help make Smith College one of the leading colleges in the United 
States, whether for men or women, but he also developed it into an institution of international distinction 
and concerns. President Neilson. himself a Scotsman, married to a well-educated German woman, trans- 
formed the college from a high-minded but provincial community in the hinterland of Massachusetts into 
a cosmopolitan center constantly animated by ideas from abroad. Between the two world wars, he 
brought many important exiled or endangered foreign teachers, scholars, lecturers and artists to the 
college. Meanwhile, as long as peace lasted, Smith students went to study in France, Italy and Spain on 
the Junior Year Abroad Program instituted by the college in 1924. 

President Neilson retired in 1939, just before the outbreak of World War n, and for one year Eliza- 
beth Cutter Morrow, an alumna trustee, served as acting president. Herbert Davis took office as Smith's 
fourth president in 1940 and reaffirmed the contributions that a liberal arts college could make to a 
troubled world. Already during World War I a group of Smith alumnae had gone to France to do relief 
work in the town of Grecourt; a replica of Grecourt's chateau gates is now emblematic of the college. 

Soon after the 19*1 bombing of Pearl Harbor, the college agreed to provide faculties on its campus 
for the first Officers' Training Unit of the Women's Reserve, or W\YES. The college added a summer term 
from 1942 to 1945 so some students could graduate more quickly and go on to government, hospital or 
military service. Though physically isolated by travel restrictions, the college retained its cosmopolitan 
character as refugees came to lecture, teach and study. And foreign films were shown regularly in Sage 
Hall — a practice that would give generations of students their sensitivity both to other cultures and to an 
important, relatively new art. President Davis' administration was marked by intensified academic life, 
reflecting his belief that serious study was a way of confronting the global threat to civilization. 



History of Smith 3 

Benjamin Fletcher Wright came from Harvard to become Smith's fifth president in 1949- The college 
had by then resumed its regular calendar and completed several much-needed building projects, includ- 
ing a new heating plant and a student recreation center named for retiring President Davis. The most 
memorable achievements of President Wright's administration were the strengthening of Smith's financial 
position and the defense of academic freedom during the 1950s. 

In 1950, the $7 Million Fund Drive was triumphantly completed, enabling the college to improve 
facilities and increase faculty salaries. In 1955, the Helen Hills Hills Chapel was completed, giving Smith 
its own place of worship. The early 1950s were not, though, easy years for colleges; McCarthyism bred a 
widespread suspicion of any writing or teaching that might seem left of center. In defending his faculty 
members' right to political and intellectual independence, President Wright showed great courage and 
statesmanship. Complementing his achievements was the financial and moral support of Smith's Alumnae 
Association, by now the most devoted and active group of its kind in the country. Before President 
Wright's term ended, the college received a large gift for constructing anew faculty office and classroom 
building to be named for him. 

When Thomas Corwin Mendenhall came from Yale in 1959 to become Smith's sixth president, both 
the college and the country at large were enjoying peace and prosperity. During the 1960s, social and 
cultural changes stirred the college profoundly, and a series of powerful movements influenced the 
larger society and the academic world alike. In response to the needs of increasingly independent and 
ambitious students, the curriculum was thoroughly revised. Collegewide requirements were set aside and 
independent study encouraged. The college made more varied educational experiences available to 
Smith undergraduates by extending cooperation with its neighbors — Amherst, Hampshire and Mount 
Holyoke colleges and the University of Massachusetts. And Smith joined other private colleges in the 
Northeast to develop the Twelve College Exchange Program. The college added buildings with the most 
modern facilities for the study of the natural sciences, performing arts and fine arts. The new fine arts 
center included the Smith College Museum of Art, now one of the most distinguished college museums 
in the country. 

The 1960s saw the civil rights movement, the students' rights movement and the anti-war movement 
take root and grow at many of the country's universities and colleges, including Smith. Thanks to these 
movements and to the wisdom, tact and humor of President Mendenhall, the college emerged from the 
1960s with a more precise awareness of student needs and an active, practical sense of social responsi- 
bility. 

Meanwhile, life in the college houses was changing. The old rules governing late evenings out and 
male visitors were relaxed, then abandoned. Not surprisingly, when Vassar began to accept men, and 
Yale, Princeton and Dartmouth to accept women as candidates for degrees, some members of the college 
community wondered whether Smith should also become coeducational. In 1971, a committee of trust- 
ees, faculty, administration, students and alumnae studied the question in detail. The committee con- 
cluded that admitting men as candidates for the Smith degree would detract from the founding purpose 
of the college — to provide the best possible education for women. 

In the late 1960s and early 1970s another important movement — the women's movement — was 
gathering momentum. This was to have a profound effect on American society and to confirm the origi- 
nal purpose of Smith College. The college began its second century in 1975 by inaugurating its first 
woman president, Jill Ker Conway, who came to Smith from Australia by way of Harvard and the Univer- 
sity of Toronto. She was a charismatic and energetic leader with a vision for women's education, and her 
administration was marked by three major accomplishments: a large-scale renovation and expansion of 
Neilson Library, evidence of Smith's undiminished concern for the heart of the liberal arts; the rapid 
growth of the Ada Comstock Scholars Program, through which women beyond the traditional college 
age could earn a Smith degree; and exceptionally successful fund-raising efforts. Also during President 
Conway's administration, the Career Development Office was expanded to better counsel Smith students 
and alumnae about career opportunities and graduate training for women. Recognizing the rapidly 
growing emphasis on fitness and athletics for women, Smith built the Ainsworth Gymnasium and broke 



4 History of Smith 

ground for new indoor and outdoor track and tennis facilities. President Conway's contributions under- 
scored her commitment to women's colleges and a liberal arts education in today's society. 

The college that President Conway left to her successor was in some ways very different from the col- 
lege served by Presidents Seelye, Burton and Neilson. When Mary Maples Dunn came to Smith in 1985 
after many years as a professor of history and then as dean of Bryn Mawr College, Smith's student body 
had diversified. During its early decades the student body had been overwhelmingly Protestant, but by the 
1970s, Roman Catholic and Jewish college chaplains served alongside the Protestant chaplain. All racial, 
ethnic and religious groups are now well represented on campus, evidence of Smith's continuing moral 
and intellectual commitment to diversity. 

In her decade as president, Mary Maples Dunn led the college through exciting and challenging 
times. During her tenure, the college raised more than $300 million, constructed two major buildings 
and renovated many more, enhanced communication on and off campus, attracted record numbers of 
applicants (while upholding the same academic standards) and doubled the value of its endowment. 
Computer technology transformed the way Smith conducted its business. And the curriculum became 
broader in scope, with five new majors and increased course offerings in non- Western and neglected 
American cultures. 

In 1994 Ruth Simmons was chosen as Smith's ninth president. With a long and distinguished career 
in higher education behind her, Simmons was the first African-American woman to head any top-ranked 
American college or university. Simmons galvanized the campus through an ambitious campuswide self- 
study process that resulted in a number of landmark initiatives, including Praxis, a program that allows 
every Smith student the opportunity to elect an internship funded by the college; an engineering pro- 
gram, the first at a women's college; programs in the humanities that include the establishment of a po- 
etry center and a peer-reviewed journal devoted to publishing scholarly works by and about women of 
color; and curricular innovations that include intensive seminars for first-year students and programs 
to encourage students' speaking and writing skills. 

A number of significant building projects were launched during Simmons' administration; most sig- 
nificant is a $35-million expansion and renovation of the Smith College Museum of Art, art department 
and art library. Ground was broken in 2002 for a campus center, and renovation of the Lyman Conserva- 
tory is under way. 

A widely respected scholar of Victorian literature, Carol T. Christ took up her duties as Smith's 10th 
president in June 2002. Recently the executive vice-chancellor and provost at the University of Califor- 
nia-Berkeley, Christ is credited with sharpening that institution's intellectual focus and building top- 
ranked departments in the humanities and sciences. She played an important role in shaping Berkeley- 
campus policy in response to Proposition 209, the 1996 California law barring the consideration of race 
in college admissions. 

Today the college continues to benefit from a dynamic relationship between innovation and tradition. 
Smith is still very much a part of Northampton, now a lively and sophisticated cultural center in its own 
right. The majority of students still live in college houses with their own common rooms, in accord with 
the original "cottage" plan. The faculty and administration are still composed of men and women, who 
work together in a professional community with mutual respect. The teaching is still as challenging as it 
is at the best coeducational colleges. And while Smith's basic curriculum of the humanities, arts and sci- 
ences still flourishes, the college continues to respond to the new intellectual needs of today's women — 
offering majors or interdepartmental programs in computer science, engineering, women's studies, 
Third World development, neuroscience, film studies, Latin American studies, history of science and 
technology, and other emerging fields. Were Sophia Smith to revisit Northampton, she would no doubt 
find her vision realized, as students at her college prepare themselves for exemplary lives of service and 
leadership. 



William Allan Neilson Professorship 



The William Allan Neilson Chair 
of Research 

The William Allan Neilson Professorship, com- 
memorating President Neilson 's profound concern 
for scholarship and research, has been held by the 
following distinguished scholars: 

Kurt Koffka. Ph.D. 
Psychology, 1927-32 

G. Antonio Borgese, Ph.D. 
Comparative Literature, 1932-35 

Sir Herbert J.C. Grierson, MA., LL.D., Litt.D. 

English, second semester, 1937-38 

Alfred Einstein, Dr. Phil. 

Music, first semester 1939-40; 1949-50 

George Edward Moore, D.Litt., LL.D. 

Philosophy, first semester 1940-41 

Karl Kelchner Darrow, Ph.D. 

Physics, second semester, 1940^1 

Carl Lotus Becker, Ph.D., Litt.D. 

Histor)', second semester, 1941-42 

Albert F. Blakeslee, Ph.D., Sc.D. (Hon.) 

Botany, 1942-43 

Edgar Wind, Ph.D. 

Art, 1944-48 

David Nichol Smith, M.A., D.Litt. (Hon.), LL.D. 

English, first semester, 1946-47 

David Mitrany, Ph.D., D.Sc. 

International Relations, second semester, 1950-51 

Pieter Geyl, Litt.D. 

History, second semester, 1951-52 

Wystan Hugh Auden, B.A. 

English, second semester, 1952-53 

Alfred Kazin, M.A. 

English, 1954-55 

Harlow Shapley, Ph.D., LL.D., Sc.D., Litt.D., Dr. 
(Hon.) 

Astronomy, first semester 1956-57 

i Philip Ellis Wheelwright, Ph.D. 

Philosophy, second semester, 1957-58 

i Karl Lehmann, Ph.D. 
Art, second semester 1958-59 

Alvin Harvey Hansen, Ph.D., LL.D. 

Economics, second semester, 1959-60 



Philippe Emmanuel Le Corbeiller, Dr.-es-Sc, 
A.M. (Hon.) 

Physics, first semester, 1960-61 

Eudora Welty, B.A., Litt.D. 

English, second semester, 1961-62 

Denes Bartha, Ph.D. 

Music, second semester, 1963-64 

Dietrich Gerhard, Ph.D. 

History, first semester, 1967-68 

Louis Frederick Fieser, Ph.D., Sc.D. (Hon.), 
D.Pharm. (Hon.) 

Chemistry, second semester, 1967-68 

Wolfgang Stechow, Dr. Phil., L.H.D., D.F.A. 
(Hon.) 

Art, second semester, 1968-69 

Robert A. Nisbet, Ph.D. 

Sociology and Anthropology, first semester, 
1971-72 

Louise Cuyler, Ph.D. 

Music, second semester, 1974-75 

Herbert G. Gutman, Ph.D. 

American Studies, 1977-78 

Renee C. Fox, Ph.D., Litt.D. (Hon.) 

Sociology and Anthropology, first semester, 
1980-81 

Auguste Angles, Docteur es Lettres 

French, first semester, 1981-82 

Victor Turner, Ph.D. 

Religion and Biblical Literature, first semester, 
1982-83 

Robert Brentano, D. Phil. 

Histor)', first semester, 1985-86 

Germaine Bree, Ph.D. 

Comparative Literature, second semester 
1985-86 

Carsten Thomassen, Ph.D. 

Mathematics, first semester, 1987-88 

Charles Hamilton, J.D., Ph.D. 

Government, second semester, 1988-89 

Triloki Nath Madan, Ph.D. 

Anthropology, first semester 1990-91 

Armstead L. Robinson, Ph.D. 

Afro-American Studies, first semester, 1991-92 



William Allan Neilson Professorship/Ruth and Clarence Kennedy Professorship 



Sheila S. Walker, Ph.D. 

Afro-American Studies, second semester, 
1991-92 

Roy S. Bryce-Laporte, Ph.D. 
Sociology, first semester, 1993-94 

Trinh T. Minh-ha, Ph.D. 

Women's Studies, second semester, 1993-94 

Rey Chow, Ph.D. 

Comparative Literature, second semester, 
1995-96 

June Nash, Ph.D. 

Latin American Studies, first semester, 1996-97 

Judith Plaskow, Ph.D. 

Women's Studies and Jewish Studies, second 
semester, 1996-97 

Irwin P. Ting, Ph.D. 

Biological Sciences, first semester, 1997-98 

Ruth Kluger, Ph.D. 

German Studies, first semester, 1998-99 

Romila Thapar, Ph.D. 

Religion and Biblical Literature, second semes- 
ter, 1998-99 

Margaret Lock, Ph.D. 

Anthropology, first semester, 1999-2000 

Thomas Greene, Ph.D. 

English Language and Literature, first semester, 
2000-01 

Carolyn Cohen, Ph.D. 

Biochemistry/Biological Sciences, second 
semester, 2001-02 

Nuala Ni Dhombnaill 

Comparative Literature, first semester, 2002-03 

The Ruth and Clarence Kennedy 
Professorship in Renaissance Studies 

The Ruth and Clarence Kennedy Professorship in 
the Renaissance, commemorating the Kennedys' 
commitment to the study of the Renaissance and 
their long-standing devotion to Smith College, has 
been held by the following distinguished scholars: 

Charles Mitchell, M.A. 
Art History, 1974-75 

Felix Gilbert, Ph.D. 

History, 1975-76 



Giuseppe Billanovlch, Dottore di Letteratura 
Italians 

Italian Humanism, second semester, 1976-77 

Jean. J. Seznec, Docteur es Lettres 

French, second semester, 1977-78 

Hans R. Guggisberg, D.Phil. 

History, first semester, 1980-81 

Alistair Crombie, Ph.D. 

History of Science, second semester, 1981-82 

John Coolidge, Ph.D. 

Architecture and Art History, second semester, 
1982-83 

Howard Mayer Brown, Ph.D. 

Music, first semester, 1983-84 

Hendrik W. van Os, Ph.D. 

Art, first semester, 1987-88 

George Kubler, Ph.D. 

Art, second semester, 1989-90 

Susan Donahue Kuretsky, Ph.D. 

Art, second semester, 1991-92 

Diane De Grazia, Ph.D. 

Art, second semester, 1993-94 

Larry Silver, Ph.D. 

Art, first semester, 1994-95 

Andree Hayum, Ph.D. 

Art, second semester, 1994-95 

Mark P.O. Morford, Ph.D. 

Classical Languages and Literatures, 1995-96 

Kenneth R. Stow, Ph.D. 

Jewish Studies, 1996-97 

Annamaria Petrioli Tofani, Dottore in Lettere 

Art and Italian Language and Literature, 
first semester, 1997-98 

Nancy Siraisi, Ph.D. 

History of the Sciences, first semester, 1998-99 

Keith Christiansen, Ph.D. 

Anthropology, first semester, 1999-2000 

Phyllis Pray Bober, Ph.D. 

Art, first semester, 2000-01 

Alison Brown, M.A. 

History, first semester, 2001-02 

Harry Berger, Jr., Ph.D. 

Art, first semester, 2002-03 



The Academic Program 



Smith: A Liberal Arts College 

The tradition of the liberal arts reaches 
back into classical antiquity. Training 
the mind through the study of lan- 
guages, literature, history, culture, 
society, mathematics, science, the arts 
and philosophy has for centuries been the favored 
approach in Europe and America for educating 
leaders. It is a general training, not intended as a 
preparation for any one profession. In the 19th 
century the liberal arts were characterized as pro- 
viding "the discipline and furniture of the mind: 
expanding its powers, and storing it with knowl- 
edge," to which was added, "The former of these 
is, perhaps, the more important of the two." At 
many liberal arts colleges today this ideal is under- 
stood as implying both breadth and depth in each 
student's course of studies, as well as the acquisi- 
tion of crucial skills in writing, public speaking 
and quantitative reasoning. 

From its foundation in 1871 Smith has taken a 
progressive, expansive and student-oriented view 
of its role as a liberal arts college. To the studies 
of the humanities and sciences the college early 
added courses in art and music, a substantial in- 
novation for its time. In the same spirit the faculty 
has continued to integrate the new and the old, 
respecting all the while the individual needs of, 
and differences among, its students. As an early 
dean of the faculty wrote, it "is always the problem 
of education, to secure the proper amount of sys- 
tem and the due proportion of individual liberty, to 
give discipline to the impulsive and wayward and 
largeness of opportunity to those who will make 
good use of it." 

In the spirit of "individual liberty [and] large- 
ness of opportunity" Smith College has since 1970 
had no distribution requirements for graduation. 
In the interest of "discipline" each student must 
complete a major, to give depth to her studies, 
while to guarantee breadth she must take at least 
64 credits outside the department or program of 
her major. As for "system" the college assigns 



each student a faculty member as academic adviser, 
and strongly recommends that students "pursue 
studies in the seven major fields of knowledge" 
listed below. Indeed, for students entering in 1994 
or later and graduating in 1998 or later, breadth is 
a condition for Latin Honors at graduation: to be 
eligible each student must take at least one course 
in each of the seven areas (see below, and p. 27) . 
The goal remains today what it was for our early 
dean, "to train minds to a symmetrical culture, 
endowed with strength and firmness, stimulated by 
ambition and a consciousness of freedom, united 
with an enlightened sense of proportion." 



The Curriculum 



Each discipline within the liberal arts framework 
offers students a valid perspective on the world's 
past, present and future. Therefore, we recommend 
that students pursue studies in the following seven 
major fields of knowledge: 

1) Literature, either in English or in some other 
language, because it is a crucial form of expres- 
sion, contributes to our understanding of hu- 
man experience and plays a central role in the 
development of culture; 

2) Historical studies, either in history or in his- 
torically oriented courses in art, music, religion, 
philosophy and theatre, because they provide a 
perspective on the development of human soci- 
ety and culture and free us from the parochial- 
ism of the present; 

3) Social science, because it offers a systematic 
and critical inquiry into human nature, social 
institutions and human relationships; 

4) Natural science, because of its methods, its con- 
tribution to our understanding of the world 
around us and its significance in modern culture; 

5) Mathematics and analytic philosophy, because 
they foster an understanding of the nature and 
use of formal, rational thought; 

6) The arts, because they constitute the media 
through which people have sought, through the 
ages, to express their deepest feelings and values; 



The Academic Program 



7) A foreign language, because it frees one from 
the limits of one's own tongue, provides access 
to another culture and makes possible commu- 
nication outside one's own society. 
We further recommend that students take perfor- 
mance courses offered in exercise and sport stud- 
ies, because they provide opportunities for recre- 
ation, health and the development of skills for the 
complete person. 

Curricular Requirements and 
Expectations 

Each first-year student is required, during her first 
or second semester at Smith, to complete at least 
one writing-intensive course. (The list of such 
courses, approved by the Committee on Academic 
Priorities, is made available at the time of registra- 
tion for each semester.) For the bachelor of arts 
degree, there are no further required courses out- 
side the student's field of concentration. The col- 
lege does, however, make two demands of the stu- 
dent: that she complete a major and that she take 
at least half of her courses outside the department 
or program of her major. The curricular require- 
ments for the bachelor of science degree in engi- 
neering are listed in the courses of study section 
under Engineering. Furthermore, students who 
wish to become eligible for Latin Honors (see p. 
27) at graduation must elect at least one course 
(normally four credits) in each of the seven major 
fields of knowledge fisted above. Each student has 
the freedom and responsibility to choose, with the 
help of academic advisers, a course of studies to fit 
her individual needs and interests. The curricular 
expectations and requirements for the degree 
therefore allow great flexibility in the design of a 
course of study leading to the degree. 



The Major 



A student's program requires a minimum of 36 
credits in a departmental or interdepartmental 
major. For the bachelor of arts degree, one-half of 
a student's total program, or at least 64 credits, 
shall be taken outside the department or program 
of the major. Any course (including prerequisites) 
which is explicitly listed in the catalogue as re- 
quired for, or counting toward, fulfilling the re- 
quirements of the major shall be considered to be 



inside the major for the purposes of this rule. The 
requirements for each major are described at the 
end of the course listings for each major depart- 
ment and program. 

Students declare their majors no later than the 
registration period during the second semester of 
the sophomore year but may declare them earlier. 
Once the major is declared, a member of the fac- 
ulty in the major department, either chosen or 
assigned, serves as the student's adviser. 

Major programs are offered by the following 
departments: 

Afro-American Studies Geology 
Anthropology German Studies 

Art Government 

Astronomy History 

Biological Sciences Italian Language 

Chemistry and Literature 

Classical Languages and Mathematics 

Literatures Music 

Computer Science Philosophy 

Dance Physics 

East Asian Languages Psychology 

and Literatures Religion and Bibli- 

Economics cal Literature 

Education and Child Russian Language 

Study and Literature 

Engineering Sociology 

English Language and Spanish and Portu- 

Literature guese 

French Studies Theatre 

Interdepartmental majors are offered in the 

following areas: 

American Studies 

Astrophysics 

Biochemistry 

Comparative Literature 

East Asian Studies 



Latin American and 
Latino/a Studies 
Medieval Studies 
Neuroscience 
Women's Studies 



If the educational needs of the individual stu- 
dent cannot be met by a course of study in any of 
the specified majors, a student may design and 
undertake an interdepartmental major sponsored 
by advisers from at least two departments, subject 
to the approval of the Committee on Academic 
Priorities. The guidelines for proposed student- 
designed interdepartmental majors are available 
in the class deans' office, College Hall 23, or from 
the Ada Comstock Scholars Office, College Hall 32. 



The Academic Program 



Students in departmental majors or in student- 
designed interdepartmental majors may enter the 
honors program. A description of the honors pro- 
gram can be found on page 12. 

On its official transcripts, the college will rec- 
ognize the completion of no more than two ma- 
jors, or one major and one minor, or one major 
and one Five College Certificate for each student, 
even if the student chooses to complete the re- 
quirements for additional majors, minors or cer- 
tificates. 

The Minor 

Students may consider the option of a minor in 
addition to a major. A minor consists of a se- 
quence, designated by the faculty, of 20 to 24 
credits from one or more departments. 

In addition to minors in many departments and 
programs offering majors, the following interde- 
partmental minors are offered: 
African Studies Latin American and 

Ancient Studies Latino/a Studies 

Archaeology Logic 

East Asian Studies Marine Sciences 

Environmental Science Medieval Studies 

and Policy Neuroscience 

Ethics Political Economy 

Film Studies Public Policy 

History of Science Third World 

and Technology Development 

International Relations Studies 

Jewish Studies Urban Studies 

Women's Studies 

Student-Designed 
Interdepartmental 
Majors and Minors 

This course of study must differ significantly from 
an established major or minor and must include 
concentrated work in more than one department. 
For majors, at least one of the departments or 
programs must itself offer a major. Majors are 
expected to include 36 to 48 credits in related 
courses in more than one department. Normally, 
a minimum of 24 credits are at the 200 level or 
higher and a minimum of eight are at the 300 



level. One of the 300-level courses may be the 
integrating project. 

Minors are expected to include 20 to 24 cred- 
its in related courses in more than one depart- 
ment, of which no more than eight credits should 
be at the 100 level and at least four should be at 
the 300 level. 

Proposals for majors may be submitted no 
earlier than the first semester of the sophomore 
year and no later than the end of advising week of 
the second semester of the junior year. The dead- 
lines for submission of proposals are November 
30 and April 30. Proposals for minors may be 
submitted at any time after the major has been 
declared but no later than the end of the first se- 
mester of the senior year. 

The major or minor proposal must include a 
statement explicitly defining the subject matter and 
method of approach underlying the design of the 
major or minor; course fists; and, for the major, a 
clearly formulated integrating course or piece of 
work. Proposals must include letters of support 
from all advisers representing the areas of study 
central to the major and written recommendations 
signed by the chairs indicating approval of the 
departments or programs in the major. 

Information about student-designed interde- 
partmental majors and minors is available from 
the class deans and the director of the Ada 
Comstock Scholars Program. 

Students in a student-designed interdepartmen- 
tal major apply to undertake an honors program 
in that major through one of the departments or 
programs of the major. 

Five College Certificate 
Programs 

Five College Certificate Programs provide a di- 
rected course of study in various interdisciplinary 
fields through the resources available at the five 
area colleges. Certificate programs are offered in 
addition to or in conjunction with the student's 
major. Certificates are awarded upon successful 
completion of a program by the appropriate Five 
College faculty councils on the recommendation 
of designated faculty advisers from the student's 
home institution. Current certificate programs in 



10 



The Academic Program 



African studies and international relations require 
that the student earn a grade of B or above in all 
courses counting for the certificate and demon- 
strate competence in a language other than En- 
glish. Each institution determines the method by 
which competence will be measured. 

Advising 

Premajor and Major Advisers 

Each student has a faculty adviser who helps her 
select and register for courses that will satisfy the 
broad expectations of the college and will further 
her personal goals and aspirations. The dean of 
the first-year class assigns a premajor faculty ad- 
viser to each first-year student. This faculty mem- 
ber will continue to advise her until she chooses 
a major. The names of major advisers appear after 
each department's course listings. 

Together the adviser and student devise a bal- 
anced academic program, making full use of the 
courses and programs available. The adviser 
approves all registration decisions, including 
changes made to the course program after the 
beginning of a semester. An adviser can help a 
student find academic and personal resources 
and can help her select and pursue various op- 
tional programs. 

In addition to aiding in the selection of 
courses, major advisers often counsel students 
about preparation for graduate schools or careers. 
The more clearly a student can articulate her own 
vision and goals, the more productive will be her 
relationship with her adviser. 

Minor Advisers 

A student electing a minor will have the guidance 
of a faculty adviser who represents the discipline, 
in addition to the help of her major adviser. She 
normally must consult with her minor adviser at 
the time she initially elects the minor, and again 
when she needs to certify that the minor has been 
completed. 

Engineering Advising 

Students who are interested in engineering should 
consult the faculty fisted on page 181. 



Prebusiness Advising 

Students who are interested in pursuing a gradu- 
ate program in business should consult with the 
Career Development Office, which provides infor- 
mation and advice about all career fields and 
graduate training. Juniors and seniors who wish 
further advice on admissions criteria may consult 
a member of the Prebusiness Advisory Group. 
Please contact the Career Development Office for 
the names of faculty and staff members who are 
members of this group. 

Premedical and Prehealth 
Professions Advising 

Students who wish to prepare for careers in the 
health professions have special advising needs. 
They may major in any subject, provided their 
program includes courses that will satisfy the 
minimum entrance requirements for health pro- 
fessions schools. 

Students interested in a premedical or other 
health-related program should consult page 122 
for important information. 

Prelaw Advising 

Law schools accept students from any major; there 
is no pre-law curriculum. Students interested in 
pursuing a law degree are encouraged to pick up 
or print off a copy of the Career Development Of- 
fice (CDO) handout on "Law School," and bring 
their questions to the CDO and/or to the faculty 
pre-law adviser (usually Alice Hearst in the gov- 
ernment department.) 

Academic Honor System 

In 1944, the students of Smith College voted to 
establish the Academic Honor System in the belief 
that each member of the Smith community has an 
obligation to uphold the academic standards of the 
college. The basic premise on which the code is 
based is that the learning process is a product of 
individual effort and commitment accompanied by 
moral and intellectual integrity. The Academic 
Honor Code is the institutional expression of these 
beliefs. The code requires that each individual be 
honest and respect and respond to the demands 
of living responsibly in an academic community. 



The Academic Program 



11 



Special Programs 

Accelerated Course Program 

With permission of the administrative board, stu- 
dents having a cumulative average of at least B 
(3.0) may complete the requirements for the de- 
gree in six or seven semesters. Four semesters, 
including two of these in the junior or senior year, 
must be completed in residence at Smith College in 
Northampton. A student who intends to study away 
from campus during the junior year should file her 
acceleration proposal by the end of the first year. 
A maximum of 32 credits can be accumulated 
toward the degree through a combination of Ad- 
vanced Placement (or similar) , pre-matriculation 
and summer school credits. Students whose accel- 
eration plans include courses to be taken during 
Interterm should be aware of the fact that these 
courses are limited both in number and in enroll- 
ment and cannot be guaranteed as part of the ac- 
celeration plan. Requests for permission to acceler- 
ate should be filed with the student's class dean at 
least two full semesters before the proposed date of 
graduation. 

The Ada Comstock Scholars Program 

The Ada Comstock Scholars Program at Smith com- 
bines the rigorous academic challenges of our un- 
dergraduate program with flexibility for women 
beyond traditional college age. 

Many women choose to work or raise a family 
rather than complete an education, but later wish 
to return to earn a degree. Established in 1975, the 
Ada Comstock Scholars Program allows women of 
nontraditional age to complete a bachelor of arts 
degree either part-time or full-time. Each Ada 
Comstock student attends the same classes and 
fulfills the same requirements as do all other Smith 
students. The program provides academic advising, 
special orientation programs, peer advising, a cen- 
ter for the exclusive use of participants in the pro- 
gram, and some housing. Career counseling and 
icademic assistance are provided through special- 
zed offices available on campus. Financial aid is 
mailable to all admitted students based on demon- 
strated need. 

Reasons for becoming an Ada Comstock 
scholar differ as widely as each woman's history, 
ige, marital status, parenting circumstances and 



socioeconomic level. Each Ada Comstock Scholar 
has a high level of ability, strong motivation and at 
least a year of transferable liberal arts credit. This 
widely disparate group of women contributes 
vigor, diversity of perspective, intellectual ability 
and enthusiasm to all aspects of Smith life. Their 
achievements confirm the academic standard of 
the college. 

A student admitted through the Office of Ad- 
mission normally will not be permitted to change 
her class status to Ada Comstock Scholar. A 
candidate's status as an Ada Comstock Scholar 
must be designated at the time of application. 

For information about application procedures, 
see page 45. Information about expenses and how 
to apply for financial aid can be found on pages 34 
and 38. For more information about the Ada 
Comstock Scholars Program, contact the program 
office at (413) 585-3090; e-mail, comstock® 
smith.edu; or fax (413) 585-3595. 

Community Auditing: 
Nonmatriculated Students 

Members of the local community who have earned 
a high school diploma are eligible to audit a lec- 
ture course at Smith on a space-available basis 
with the permission of the instructor and the regis- 
trar. Both forms for the faculty member's signature 
and more information about auditing are available 
at the Office of the Registrar. A fee is charged and 
is determined by the type of course. Normally stu- 
dio art courses are not open to non-matriculated 
students. Auditors are invited to attend classes, but 
they do not participate in other aspects of college 
life. Records of audits are not maintained. 

Five College Interchange 

After the first semester of her first year, a student 
in good standing may take a course without addi- 
tional cost at Amherst, Hampshire and Mount 
Holyoke colleges or the University of Massachu- 
setts, if the course is appropriate to the educa- 
tional plan of the student and approved by Smith 
College. A list of Five College courses approved for 
Smith College degree credit is available at the 
registrar's office. Requests for approval of courses 
not on the list may be submitted to the registrar's 
office. However, Smith College does not accept all 



12 



The Academic Program 



Five College courses for credit toward the Smith 
degree. 

Departmental Honors Program 

The Departmental Honors Program is for qualified 
students who want to study a particular topic in 
depth or undertake research within the depart- 
ment of the major. Students should consult the 
departmental director of honors about application 
deadlines. Students must have departmental per- 
mission and a 3-3 average for all courses in the 
major and a 3.0 average for courses outside the 
major through the junior year. Only Smith College, 
Five College and Smith College Junior Year Abroad 
grades are counted. Departmental honors require- 
ments are outlined in the catalogue following each 
department's course offerings. Information re- 
garding procedures can be obtained from depart- 
mental directors of honors, the class deans or the 
director of the Ada Comstock Scholars Program. 
The culmination of the work is a thesis written 
under the direction of a member of the depart- 
ment. 

Independent Study Projects/ 
Internships 

Independent study projects may be proposed by 
juniors and seniors who wish to complete a spe- 
cial project of work or study on or off campus. 
All projects must be approved by the Committee 
on Academic Priorities and are under the direct 
supervision of Smith College faculty members. 
The maximum that may be granted for an off- 
campus project is eight credits. The maximum 
that may be granted for an on-campus project is 
16 credits. Any independent study project must be 
completed within a single semester. The deadline 
for submission of proposals is November 30 for a 
second-semester program and April 30 for a first- 
semester program. Information about the Inde- 
pendent Study Program is available in the office 
of the class deans and the Ada Comstock Scholars 
office. No independent study project may be un- 
dertaken during the summer or January. 

All internships for credit must be approved in 
advance by the Committee on Academic Priorities 
and are under the direct supervision of a member 
or members of the faculty of Smith College. A 



maximum of eight credits can be granted for ap- 
proved internships. Credit is not given for intern- 
ships undertaken during January. For summer in- 
ternships, tuition is charged by the credit. The 
deadline for submission of proposals is November 
30 for a second-semester program and April 30 foi 
a summer or first-semester program. Information 
and applications for internships are available in the 
office of the class deans and the Ada Comstock 
Scholars office. A maximum of 16 credits for inde- 
pendent study projects and internships combined i 
allowed. 

Smith Scholars Program 

The Smith Scholars Program is designed for highly 
motivated and talented students who want to spend 
one or two years working on projects of their own 
devising, freed (in varying degrees) from normal 
college requirements. A student may apply at any 
time after the first semester of her sophomore year 
and must submit a detailed statement of her pro- 
gram, an evaluation of her proposal and her capac 
ity to complete it from those faculty who will advise 
her and two supporting recommendations from 
instructors who have taught her in class. The dead- 
fines for submission of proposals for the Smith 
Scholars Program are November 30 and April 30 
the student's junior year. The proportion of work t( 
be done in normal courses will be decided jointly 
by the student, her adviser(s) and the Committee 
on Academic Priorities. Work done in the program 
may result in a thesis, a group of related papers, ai 
original piece of work, such as a play, or some 
combination of these. 

A Smith Scholar may or may not complete a 
regular departmental major. Further details, guide- 
lines and applications are available from depart- 
ment chairs, honors directors, the class deans and 
the director of the Ada Comstock Scholars Pro- 
gram. 

Study Abroad Programs 

Smith College offers a wide range of study abroad 
programs, from Smith's own programs in Western 
Europe to Smith-approved programs all over the 
world. For the Smith Junior Year Abroad (JYA) 
programs in Florence, Hamburg, Geneva and Paris. 



The Academic Program 



13 



a JYA program application must be filed by Febru- 
'ary 1 in the Office for International Study. For all 
other study abroad programs, students must sub- 
t mit a plan of study for college approval in the se- 
mester prior to studying abroad. (February 15 for 
fall or full-year study; October 15 for spring semes- 
ter study.) Students should contact the Office for 
International Study for information on deadlines 
and procedures. 

For all programs, the Smith College compre- 
hensive fee is charged. The comprehensive fee, 
covering tuition, room and board when classes are 
ji session, is the same as the comprehensive fee 
for a year's study in Northampton. Smith pays tu- 
ition, room and board on behalf of the student to 
the study abroad program or the host institution. 

Students are responsible for all expenses and 
all travel during program breaks or vacations. 
Incidental expenses vary according to individual 
tastes and plans, and funds for such expenses are 
not covered by the comprehensive fee. 

Financial aid is available for all approved study 
abroad programs on the same basis as it is for 
study in Northampton. 

All students who wish to study abroad must 
obtain approval from the Office for International 
tody. Students must be in good academic and stu- 
dent judicial standing, have a declared major and 
10 shortage of credit at the time of application to 
3e approved for study abroad. Exceptions are con- 
sidered on a case-by-case basis. Students should 
lote that a year or semester abroad does not count 
Ward the required two years in residence at 
toiith College. 

Smith College Junior Year Abroad 
Programs 

Hie Smith College Junior Year Abroad Programs 
)rovide students in a variety of disciplines the op- 
wrtunity for study, research, internships and resi- 
lence in foreign countries. Smith faculty direct the 
our programs in Europe: France (Paris), Germany 
Hamburg), Italy (Florence) and Switzerland 
Geneva). The programs provide a rich opportu- 
lity to observe and study the countries visited. Stu- 
ients are encouraged to enjoy the music, art and 
heatre of each country; meetings are arranged 
vith outstanding scholars, writers and leaders. 
)uring the academic year students board with lo- 



cal families or live in student dormitories or in 
other college-approved housing. During vacations 
students are free to travel, although by special ar- 
rangements in some programs they may stay in 
residence if they prefer. 

Each Smith JYA program lasts a full academic 
year; students are not accepted for a single semes- 
ter. A student studying on a Smith College Junior 
Year Abroad Program will normally receive 34 
credits for the academic year. In exceptional 
cases, with the permission of the director and the 
associate dean for international study; students 
may earn up to 40 credits for a year on a Smith 
Junior Year Abroad Program. 

Each program is directed by a member of the 
Smith College faculty who serves as the official rep- 
resentative of the college. The director oversees the 
academic programs and general welfare of the 
students. During program breaks or vacations the 
college assumes no responsibility for participants 
in the Junior Year Abroad Programs. The supervi- 
sion of the director and responsibility of Smith 
College ends with the close of the academic year. 

Applicants should have a minimum cumulative 
grade point average of 3.0 (B) , a declared major 
and a minimum of two years of college-level 
instruction in the appropriate language before 
they can be selected to spend the year abroad. 
All prospective candidates are urged to seek ad- 
vice, beginning in their first year, concerning the 
best sequence of courses in the language of the 
country in which they wish to study. Students who 
spend the junior year abroad may apply for admis- 
sion to the honors program at the beginning of the 
senior year. 

Each year, participants for the Junior Year 
Abroad programs are chosen by a selection com- 
mittee, which reviews the applications in detail. 
The selection process is competitive. Participants 
are selected from both Smith College and other 
colleges. All applications for the Smith College 
Junior Year Abroad Programs, including recom- 
mendations, must be filed with the Office for Inter- 
national Study by February 1 . 

If a student should withdraw from a Junior 
Year Abroad Program during the course of the 
year, it is college policy not to grant credit for less 
than a full year's work and to refund only those 
payments for board and room which may be re- 
covered by the college. Tuition charges for the 



14 



The Academic Prograir 



year are not refundable. Normally, students who 
withdraw from a Junior Year Abroad Program are 
withdrawn from Smith and may not return to the 
college the following semester. 

FLORENCE 

The year in Florence begins with five weeks of 
intensive work in the Italian language. Classes in 
art history, literature and history are offered dur- 
ing orientation as preparation for the more spe- 
cialized work of the academic year. The students 
are matriculated at the Universita di Firenze to- 
gether with Italian students for the second semes- 
ter. Students may elect courses offered especially 
for Smith by university professors at the Smith 
Center, as well as the regular university courses. 
Thus, a great variety of subjects is available in ad- 
dition to the traditional courses in art history, lit- 
erature and history; other fields of study include 
music, religion, government, philosophy and com- 
parative literature. The students live in private 
homes selected by the college. Since classes in 
Florence are conducted entirely in Italian, students 
are expected to have an excellent command of the 
language. Sixteen credits of college-level Italian 
are required for participation. 

GENEVA 

The year in Geneva is international in orientation 
and offers unique opportunities to students of 
government, economics, economic history, Euro- 
pean history, international relations, comparative 
literature, French studies, anthropology, psychol- 
ogy, American studies, sociology, history of art and 
religion. Students are fully matriculated at the 
Universite de Geneve and take courses at its asso- 
ciate institutes as well, where the present and past 
roles of Geneva as a center of international organi- 
zation are consciously fostered. Exceptional op- 
portunities include internships in international 
organizations, the faculty of psychology and educa- 
tion that continues the work of Jean Piaget, and 
the rich holdings of the museums of Geneva in 
Western and Oriental art. 

Students in the program attend a preliminary 
session of intensive language training in Paris in 
September. The academic year begins in mid- 
October and continues until early July. Since 
classes in Geneva are conducted in French, 
students are expected to have an excellent com- 



mand of the language. For prerequisites, see the 
requirements for study abroad under French Stud- 



ies. 



HAMBURG 

The academic year in Germany consists of two 
semesters (winter semester from mid-October to 
mid-February and summer semester from the be- 
ginning of April to mid-July) separated by a six- 
week vacation during which students are free to 
travel. The winter semester is preceded by a six- 
week orientation program in Hamburg providing 
language review, an introduction to current affairs 
and to the city of Hamburg, and excursions to 
other places of interest in Germany. During the 
academic year the students are fully matriculated 
at the Universitat Hamburg. They attend regular 
courses offered by the university, special courses 
arranged by Smith and tutorials coordinated with 
the course work. The program is open to students 
in almost every major field of study, and a wide 
variety of courses is available, including art (stu- 
dio and history), biology, economics, history, his- 
tory of science and technology, literature, math- 
ematics, music history, philosophy, physics, psy- 
chology, religion and sociology. Since classes in 
Hamburg are conducted in German, students are 
expected to have an excellent command of the 
language; normally, four semesters of college Ger- 
man are required for participation in the program 

PARIS 

The program in France begins with a five-week 
period in Aix-en-Provence devoted to intensive 
work in the language, supplemented by courses, 
lectures and excursions. In early October, each 
student selects a program of courses suited to 
her particular major. A wide variety of disciplines 
can be pursued in the various branches of the 
Universite de Paris; for example, art history at the 
Institut d'Art et d'Archeologie; studio art at the 
Atelier St. Paul; government or economics at the 
Institut d'fitudes Politiques; history, literature, 
philosophy, religion and many other subjects at 
the Sorbonne (Paris IV). Courses at such institu- 
tions are sometimes supplemented by special 
tutorials. A few courses or seminars are arranged 
exclusively for Smith students. The students live 
in private homes selected by the college. Since 
classes in Paris are conducted in French, student; 



Hie Academic Program 



IS 



are expected to have an excellent command of the 
language. For prerequisites, see the requirements 
for study abroad under French Studies. 

Smith-Approved Study Abroad 

Smith-approved programs are in all regions of the 
world, including Latin America, Asia, Africa, En- 
iglish-speaking countries, and countries in Europe 
not served by Smith programs. Smith-approved 
.study abroad programs are selective but generally 
open to students with a strong academic back- 
ground and sufficient preparation in the language 
and culture of the host country. A list of approved 
programs is available from the Office for Interna- 
tional Study along with the guidelines for study 
abroad. Students wishing to petition for approval 
for a program not approved by Smith must do so 
by mid-semester prior to the deadline for study 
abroad applications. 

Faculty at Smith advise students about study 
abroad course selection, and several academic 
departments have a special affiliation with specific 
Smith-approved programs. Consult the Web page 
of the Office for International Study, www.smith. 
edu/studyabroad, for the complete list of approved 
programs, including some alternatives to the pro- 
grams below. Programs with a Smith consortial 
affiliation include the following: 

ASSOCIATED KYOTO PROGRAM (AKP) 

Smith is one of the sponsors of the year-long AKP 
program in Japan and conducts the selection pro- 
cess. Interested students should consult the faculty 
in East Asian Languages and Cultures and East 
Asian Studies. Faculty in these programs also ad- 
vise students about associated colleges in 

CHINA (ACC). 

PROGRAMA DE ESTUDIOS HlSPANICOS IN 
CORDOBA (PRESHCO) 

Smith is one of the sponsors of the program in 
Cordoba, Spain, and conducts the selection pro- 
cess. Interested students should consult faculty in 
the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. 

SOUTH INDIA TERM ABROAD (SlTA) 

Smith is one of the sponsors of this fall semester 
program and conducts the selection process. In- 
terested students should consult the Office for 
International Study, which also advises students 
about Brown University in India. 



Off-Campus Study Programs 
in the U.S. 

Jean Picker Semester-in-Washington 
Program 

The Department of Government offers the Jean 
Picker Semester-in-Washington Program during the 
fall semester to provide juniors and seniors in gov- 
ernment or related majors an opportunity to study 
the process by which public policy is made and 
implemented at the national level. The program is 
described in detail on page 252. 

Internship at the Smithsonian 
Institution 

The American Studies Program offers a one- 
semester internship at the Smithsonian Institution 
in Washington, D.C. Under the supervision of out- 
standing scholars, qualified students may examine 
some of the finest collections of materials relating 
to the development of culture in America. The pro- 
gram is described in detail on page 80. 

Twelve College Exchange Program 

Smith College participates in an exchange program 
with the following colleges: Amherst, Bowdoin, 
Connecticut, Dartmouth, Mount Holyoke, Trinity, 
Vassar, Wellesley, Wesleyan, Wheaton and Williams. 
The exchange is open to a limited number of stu- 
dents with a minimum 2.8 average and is intended 
primarily for the junior year. Normally, students 
participating in the program may not transfer to the 
host institution at the end of their stay there. Stu- 
dents should be aware that the member colleges 
may limit or eliminate their participation in the 
exchange in any particular year, due to space con- 
straints. 

A limited pool of financial aid is available for 
students studying in the Twelve College Exchange. 
International students may apply for the exchange; 
however, Smith financial aid does not carry to the 
host institution. 

One-semester programs associated with the 
Twelve College Exchange are the National Theater 
Institute in Waterford, Connecticut, sponsored by 
Connecticut College, the Williams-Mystic Seaport 
Program in American Maritime Studies, in Mystic, 



16 The Academic Progra 

Connecticut, sponsored by Williams College and 
Biosphere2, sponsored by Columbia University. 

Students accepted into the program are ex- 
pected to pay the fees set by the host institution 
and to comply with the financial, social and aca- 
demic regulations of that institution. The course 
of study to be followed at the host institution must 
have the approval of the student's major adviser at 
Smith College. 

Application forms are available in the class 
deans' office. 

Pomona-Smith Exchange 

The college participates in a one-to-one student 
exchange with Pomona College in Claremont, Cali- 
fornia. Sophomores and juniors in good standing, 
with a minimum 3-0 (B) average, are eligible to 
apply. Applications are available in the class deans' 
office. 

Study at Historically Black Colleges 

Interested students may apply for a year's study, 
usually in the junior year, at one of several histori- 
cally black colleges. The course program to be 
followed at the host institution must have the ap- 
proval of the student's major adviser at Smith Col- 
lege. Further information and application forms 
are available in the Office of the Class Deans. 



1" 



The Campus and Campus Life 



mith's 125-acre campus is a place of 
physical beauty and interesting people, 
ideas and events. Students enjoy fine 
facilities and services in a stimulating 
environment. We continually improve 
our library and museum holdings, which are al- 
ready among the finest in the country, and upgrade 
our equipment to give students here every techno- 
logical advantage. 

Smith attracts faculty members and students 
who are intellectually energetic and highly moti- 
/ated. Together, we form a community with diverse 
:alents and interests, skills and training, and reli- 
Igious, cultural, political, geographic and socioeco- 
nomic backgrounds. Many groups, activities and 
events arise from our broad range of interests. 
Members of the Five College community are wel- 
come in classes and at most campus events. Their 
participation expands even further the perspec- 
tives and experiences we represent. 

All undergraduate students at Smith are part 
of the Student Government Association, which sup- 
ports approximately 100 student organizations and 
their projects and programs. These organizations 
lenrich the lives of their participants and of the gen- 
eral community through a wealth of concerts, pre- 
sentations, lectures, readings, movies, workshops, 
symposia, exhibits and plays that enhance the 
rhythm of campus life. Academic and administra- 
itive departments and committees, resource cen- 
ters, individual faculty members and alumnae also 
jcontribute to the already full schedule. 

The pace and style of campus life vary greatly, 
as each woman creates the academic and social 
i lifestyle best suited to her taste. Daily campus life 
includes periods both of great activity and move- 
ment and of quiet and intense concentration. 
There is time for hard work, for listening and 
speaking, for learning and teaching and for 
friends, fun and relaxation. The extracurricular 
social, athletic and cultural events on campus, 
in Northampton, and in the Five College area keep 
this an exciting center of activity. Each student 
learns through the overwhelming choices open 
to her how to develop and sustain a pace of life 
that is balanced and mlfilling. 



Facilities 



Much of the daily campus activity at Smith occurs 
in the following centers. 

Smith College Libraries 

With a collection of more than 1.4 million books, 
periodicals, microforms, maps, scores, record- 
ings, rare books, archives, manuscripts and com- 
puter databases, the Smith College Libraries rival 
many university libraries. We are committed to 
providing undergraduates with firsthand research 
opportunities not only through our extensive re- 
sources but also through specialized services. We 
maintain open stacks, provide individual research 
assistance, collaborate with faculty in teaching 
classes on research tools and techniques and bor- 
row materials from other libraries at no cost 
through our international interlibrary loan service. 
The libraries' Web page (www.smith.edu/librar- 
ies) links students to the Five College Library cata- 
logue, with the holdings of Smith, Amherst, Mount 
Holyoke and Hampshire colleges and the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Amherst, to general and 
subject databases, to full-text resources and to the 
Internet. 

The William Allan Neilson Library, named after 
Smith's third president, serves as the main social 
sciences and humanities library and includes the 
library administrative offices. On the third floor, 
the Mortimer Rare Book Room showcases more 
than 25,000 printed books in all subjects from 
the 15th through 20th centuries plus the Virginia 
Woolf and Sylvia Plath manuscript collections. 
The Rare Book Room is open to all undergradu- 
ates for browsing and in-depth study of these spe- 
cialized materials. 

The Alumnae Gymnasium, connected to 
Neilson Library, houses the Sophia Smith Collec- 
tion, the oldest national repository for primary 
sources in women's history; the College Archives, 
which documents the history of Smith; and the 
Nonprint Resources Center, which collects a vari- 
etv of video materials. 



18 



The Campus and Campus Life 



Strong branch libraries help set Smith apart 
from other undergraduate colleges by providing 
specialized resources and services in specific sub- 
ject areas. The three branches, described in sec- 
tions below, are the Hillyer Art Library in the Fine 
Arts Center, the Young Science Library in Bass Hall 
(Clark Science Center) and the Werner Josten 
Library for the Performing Arts in the Mendenhall 
Center. 

Nellson Library hours (Academic Year) 

Monday-Thursday 7:45 a.m.-midnight 
Friday 7:45 a.m.-ll p.m. 

Saturday 10 a.m.-ll p.m. 

Sunday 10 a.m.-midnight 

Hours vary during reading and exam periods, 
intersession, summer, vacations and holidays. 

Clark Science Center 

The Clark Science Center is composed of six 
interconnected buildings housing eight academic 
departments (astronomy, biological sciences, 
chemistry, computer science, geology, mathematics, 
physics and psychology) and four programs (bio- 
chemistry, engineering, environmental science and 
policy and neuroscience) , with approximately 85 
faculty and 20 staff. The center, which includes Bur- 
ton, Sabin-Reed, McConnell and Bass halls, the 
temporary engineering building and Young Science 
Library, meets the most exacting specifications for 
modern scientific experimentation and equipment. 
Science center facilities include traditional and 
computer classrooms, seminar rooms, a large lec- 
ture hall, a computer resource center, student labo- 
ratories and faculty offices and research space. The 
educative mission in the sciences is supported by an 
administrative office, stockroom, technical shop, 
environmental health and safety services, science 
inreach programming and an animal-care facility. 
The Young Science Library, a state-of-the-art science 
library and one of the largest science libraries at a 
liberal arts college in the United States, houses 
more than 159,000 volumes, 22,500 microforms, 
700 periodical subscriptions, and 154,000 maps, 
and provides a wide array of computer databases 
and other electronic resources including access 
to the Internet from 15 computer workstations. 



Student laboratories customarily enroll between 12 
and 20 students and are faculty taught. Summer 
student research opportunities are available. 

Adjacent to the Clark Science Center are the 
Botanic Gardens and Lyman Plant House, with 
greenhouses illustrating a variety of climates. The 
campus grounds are an arboretum, with plants 
and trees labeled for easy identification. 

Young Science Library hours (Academic Year) 

Monday-Thursday 7:45 a.m.-midnight 
Friday 7:45 a.m.-ll p.m. 

Saturday 10 a.m-10 p.m. 

Sunday 10 a.m.-midnight 

Hours vary during reading and exam periods, 
intersession, summer, vacations and holidays. 

Fine Arts Center 

The three portions of the Fine Arts Center serve 
different functions. Hillyer Hall, which houses the 
art department, is a center for the creative endeav- 
ors of students and faculty. Its studios for students 
of drawing, painting, design, sculpture, print- 
making and photography are supplemented by 
darkroom facilities, faculty offices and classrooms 

Hillyer Art Library houses collections of more 
than 90,000 volumes, 37,000 microforms, 325 
current periodicals, and a broad range of biblio- 
graphic databases and full-text electronic re- 
sources. The newly renovated art library facilities 
provide a variety of spaces for individual and 
group study with power and data connectivity 
available at all seats. 

Tryon Hall is home to the Smith College 
Museum of Art, known as one of the nation's out- 
standing museums affiliated with a college or uni- 
versity. Its collection, numbering approximately 
24,000 objects, represents works dating from the 
25th century B.C. to the present. 



Art Library hours 

Monday-Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 



8a.m.-ll p.m. 
8 a.m.-9 p.m. 
10 a.m.-9 p.m. 
noon-midnight 



Hours vary during reading and exam periods, 
intersession, summer, vacations and holidays. 



fhe Campus and Campus Life 



19 



Museum hours 

(Tie Museum of Art is closed for renovation. Staff 
:an be reached Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 
> p.m., through September 2002 at Leonard 
ouse at the Clarke School for the Deaf, 32 Round 

Road. By October 2002 staff will have re- 
urned to their offices in the Museum of Art. The 
nuseum will reopen in spring 2003; open hours 
i o be announced. 

1 

Mendenhall Center for the 
! Performing Arts 

j Earned for Thomas Mendenhall, president of the 

Lollege from 1959 to 1975, the Center for the Per- 

brrning Arts celebrates music, theatre and dance. 

1 Chree sides of the quadrangle were completed in 

(1968, joining Sage Hall to complete the college's 

:ommitment to modern and comprehensive facili- 

ies for the performing arts. Berenson Studio for 

I lancers accommodates both individual and class 

• s nstruction in two mirrored studios. The theatre 

H Duilding has extensive rehearsal space, shops and 

* ounges that support productions in Theatre 14, 
which holds an audience of 458; the versatile 
trlallie Flanagan Studio Theatre, with its movable 

ft heats for 200; and the TV. studio, which has flex- 
- I.ble seating for 80. The Werner Josten Library 
I welcomes students, making available more than 
I )0,000 books and scores, 600 video recordings, 
!237 current periodical titles and 55,000 record- 
s Jigs to enjoy in comfortable reading rooms and in 
listening rooms for individuals and groups. Newly 
renovated Sage Hall allows students to practice 
their music at one end and perform it in a gra- 
cious 750-seat auditorium at the other. In between 
I are faculty offices and classrooms. The Menden- 
i hall Center for the Performing Arts is crowned by 
i tower with a peal of eight bells hung for change 
it ringing. 

Werner Josten Library hours 

Monday-Thursday 8 a.m.-l 1 p.m. 

Friday 8 a.m.-9 p.m. 

Saturday 10 a.m.-9 p.m. 

Sunday noon- 11 p.m. 

Hours vary during reading and exam periods, 
intersession, summer, vacations and holidays. 



Wright Hall 

Wright Hall supports many activities of learning in 
a variety of ways. The large auditorium for 400, 
the seminar rooms, the Center for Foreign Lan- 
guages and Cultures, the Jahnige Social Science 
Research Center with 24 computer stations and 
more than 500 data sets, the conference lounge 
and the 51 faculty offices draw students for formal 
classroom study, for lectures and special presenta- 
tions, for informal discussions and for research. 

Center for Foreign Languages and 
Cultures (CFLAC) 

The Center for Foreign Languages and Cultures 
maintains a state-of-the-art multimedia resource 
center (Wright Hall 7) and media classroom 
(Wright 233), housing a network of student work- 
stations with integrated computer, audio and video 
components for the study of foreign language, 
culture and literature. In the center, students may 
explore foreign cultures with the aid of interactive 
DVDs, digitized video and audio and CALL (com- 
puter assisted language learning) programs. The 
center also supports exercises for more than 30 
courses in 1 1 languages through QuickTime audio 
movies delivered via Blackboard. Faculty members 
may receive assistance at the center in evaluating 
commercial courseware, in creating original inter- 
active audio and video as well as CALL materials, 
or in organizing research projects in the field of 
second language acquisition. 



Center Hours 




Monday-Thursday 


8:30 a.m.-noon 




1-6 p.m. 




7-11 p.m. 


Friday 


8:30 a.m.-noon 




1-5 p.m. 


Saturday 


1-5 p.m. 


Sunday 


1-5 p.m. 




7-11 p.m. 



Information Technology Services 

Information Technology Services' academic facili- 
ties span the campus, with public computing 
labs in several buildings and a campuswide fiber- 
optic network allowing computer access from all 



20 



The Campus and Campus Life 



buildings and residential houses. Resources, which 
are continually expanding, include more than 500 
IBM-compatible and Macintosh computers used for 
word processing, graphics, numerical analysis, 
electronic mail and access to the Internet; and nu- 
merous UNIX computers, used for statistical analy- 
sis, computer programming, electronic communi- 
cations and other class assignments. In addition, 
Information Technology Services administers the 
Smith College Computer Store, through which a 
student may purchase a personal computer at a 
discounted price. There are no fees for the use of 
computers and printers in the resource centers, 
nor do Smith students need to be enrolled in a 
course using computers to have access to them. 
Students living on campus also have access to 
Smith's computer resources and the Internet 
through CyberSmith, the residential house network. 

Jacobson Center for Writing, 
Teaching and Learning 

From its offices in Seelye 307, the Jacobson Center 
offers a variety of programs to help students de- 
velop skills in writing, public speaking and effective 
learning. A staff of professional writing counselors 
is available to review student drafts, point out 
strengths and weaknesses, listen to new ideas and 
make suggestions for improvement. In the evenings 
and on weekends the same services are provided by 
student writing assistants stationed in the center 
and other campus locations. The Jacobson Center 
also offers classes and individual meetings for stu- 
dents wanting to improve their public speaking 
skills. In the tutorial program, students seeking 
help with a particular subject — economics or 
French, psychology or mathematics, virtually any 
subject taught at Smith — are matched with student 
tutors who have done well in the subject and have 
been recommended by faculty members. A quanti- 
tative skills counselor works with students who 
need help with the mathematical content of their 
course work. All of these services are free and are 
used by substantial numbers of Smith students, 
ranging from first-year students taking their first 
college courses to seniors writing Honors essays. 
The Jacobson Center also offers workshops in time 
management and study skills. It maintains a library 
of resources on improving teaching skills for faculty 
members and. in conjunction with the dean for 



academic development, sponsors for faculty an 
extensive program of coDoquia on teaching issues. 
Full information on the Jacobson Center is avail- 
able on their Web site, wvvw.smith.edu/ 
jacobsoncenter/index.html. 

Athletic Facility Complex 

Just as Alumnae Gymnasium was the "state of the 
art'" gymnasium back in 1892 when women's bas- 
ketball was first introduced, today's three-building 
athletic complex is equally impressive. Scott Gym- 
nasium is home to a dance studio, gymnasium, 
weight room with Eagle and free weights, training 
room and the Human Performance Laboratory. Th< 
newer Ainsworth Gymnasium provides a swimming 
pool with one- and three-meter diving boards, five 
newly renovated international-sized squash courts, 
a fitness studio with a 24-foot-high climbing wall 
and an intercollegiate gymnasium. The mdoor 
track and tennis building, the site of three national 
NCAA track meets, includes four tennis courts and 
a 200-meter track. The facilities of the sports com- 
plex are augmented by 30 acres of athletic fields. 
Soccer, lacrosse, field hockey, rugby and Softball 
fields are encircled by a 3/-*-mile cinder jogging 
track. For the serious runner, there is a 400-meter 
all-weather track, and for those who enjoy the 
peaceful solitude of a run through the woods, then 
is a 5,000-meter cross-country course. Equestrian' 
can enjoy the indoor riding ring while the avid 
tennis competitor will find the 12 lighted outdoor 
courts a pleasure. The boathouse on Paradise 
Pond is home to the Smith Outdoors Program and 
is open for novice rowers or canoe paddlers. 

Ainsworth/ Scott Gymnasium and Indoor 
Track and Tennis Facility 

Monday-Thursday 6 a.m.-l 1 p.m. 
Friday 6 a.m.-9 p.m. 

Saturday-Sunday 8 a.m.-9 p.m. 

Student Residence Houses 

Smith is a residential college, and students are ex- 
pected to reside on campus during their academic 
studies at Smith. Students live in 36 residence buiL 
ings with capacities of 12 to 102 students. The 
houses range in architectural style from modern 



. 



'he Campus and Campus Life 



n 



o Gothic to classic revival. Each house has a com- 
ortable living room, a study or library; and laundry 
acilities. Many houses have a dining room where 
;tudents eat meals prepared by the house kitchen 
;taff or they share a dining room with other houses 
vitlun the same geographic area. Students at all 
evels, from first-years to seniors, live together in 
?ach house, advising, supporting, and sharing inter- 
Its with one another. A variety of specialty living 
options are also available for students: two coopera- 
ive houses and apartments for Ada Comstock 
icholars and returning students provide alternative 
iving arrangements. A small cooperative house and 
ji apartment complex for a limited number of jun- 
ors and seniors offer additional alternative living 
irrangements to students. 

Intercollegiate Athletics, 
[ntramurals and Club Sports 

v three-tier system of intercollegiate athletics, 
ntramurals and club sports provides satisfying 
ind successful experiences that will develop in 
he Smith student a desire to participate in activity 
egularly throughout life. Our broad-based athletic 
)rogram invites students to participate on one of 
14 intercollegiate teams. House-organized intramu- 
al teams offer rivalries, while our club sports in- 
roduce training in several sports. These experi- 
ences provide opportunities to compete as well as 
o cooperate with others in striving for achievement 
)f common goals. 



lareer Development 



The Career Development Office provides assistance 
o students, alumnae, Smith staff and faculty and 
heir families in preparing for changing career envi- 
onments and climates. We work with Smith women 
o help them develop global and personal foresight 
;o that they can direct the change in their lives. 

Our professional staff offers counseling, both 
ndividually and in groups, and our services are 
ivailable 52 weeks a year. We hold seminars, work- 
shops and panel discussions that cover internships, 
:areer choice and decision making, resume writing, 
nterviewing and job search techniques, alumnae 
letworking, career presentations, applying to 



graduate and professional schools and summer 
jobs. We teach people of all ages how to assess their 
individual interests, strengths and weaknesses; how 
to establish priorities and make decisions; how to 
present themselves effectively; and how to do all of 
this successfully at different stages of their lives. Our 
extensive career resource library supports students 
in their research. 

We encourage all members of the Smith com- 
munity to participate in their own career develop- 
ment. We are a network that allows students to 
translate their academic and extra-curricular pur- 
suits and their hopes and expectations into fruitful 
plans for the future. We also support alumnae as 
they undertake their plans and ask them to support 
the students yet to come by participating as infor- 
mal advisers in the Alumnae Career Advising Ser- 
vice. Alumnae and families of staff and faculty are 
charged a small fee for individual counseling ap- 
pointments and various publications and self-as- 
sessment materials, but there is no charge for the 
use of print and nonprint materials or for short 
drop-in advising sessions. Smith employees pay no 
fee for individual counseling. We see the Career 
Development Office as one of the most important 
implemented of the Smith "lifetime guarantee." 
Students, staff and alumnae are encouraged to visit 
the CDO home page at http://ww.smith.edu/cdo 
for updated calendar and career resource connec- 
tions. Students and alumnae can access jobs, in- 
ternships and alumnae contacts through E-access, 
the CDO's on-line service. 

Praxis Summer Internship Funding 
Program 

"Praxis: The Liberal Arts at Work," administered 
through the Career Development Office, funds stu- 
dents to work at substantive, unpaid summer in- 
ternships related to their academic and/or career 
interests. By offering financial support, the College 
acknowledges the importance of internships in 
helping students explore careers, observe the prac- 
tical applications of their academic studies, and 
gain work experience that enhances their market- 
ability to employers and graduate schools. Since 
the majority (about 70 percent) of internships are 
unpaid, Praxis stipends are intended to make it 
financially possible for students to work at substan- 
tive summer internships. Praxis funding is a one- 



22 



The Campus and Campus Life 



time opportunity. A student may use a Praxis sti- 
pend for an approved internship in the summer 
following her sophomore or junior year. CDO staff 
and resources offer guidance and assistance to 
students in locating opportunities that meet their 
individual interests. Proposed internships are re- 
viewed by a member of the faculty and by CDO staff. 
Each year approximately five hundred students 
work at summer internships funded through 
"Praxis: The Liberal Arts at Work." 



Health Services 



www.smith.edu/health 

Health Services provides medical and psychological 
services and health education for all Smith stu- 
dents. Through outpatient services located in the 
Elizabeth Mason Infirmary, students see physicians, 
nurse practitioners and nurses for medical prob- 
lems and questions, just as they would see their 
own providers at home. For psychological issues, 
students see social workers, psychologists and 
graduate social work interns. A psychiatrist is also 
available. 

Health Service 

The same standards of confidentiality apply to the 
doctor-patient relationship at Smith as to all other 
medical practitioners. We offer a full range of out- 
patient services to our patient population, including 
gynecological exams and testing; nutrition counsel- 
ing; routine physicals for summer employment and 
graduate school; immunizations for travel, flu and 
allergies; and on-site laboratory services. 

Students who are ill and need some medical 
supervision but do not require an acute care hospi- 
tal may be admitted to our intermediate health care 
facility by one of the college providers. There is a 
charge for this care for those students not electing 
to enroll in one of the Smith College insurance 
plans. In case of unusual or serious illness, special- 
ists in the Northampton and Springfield areas are 
available for consultation. 

Counseling Service 

The Counseling Service provides consultation, indi- 
vidual and group psychotherapy and psychiatric 
evaluation and medication. These services are 
strictiy confidential. The Counseling Service is avail- 
able to all students, free of charge. It is staffed by 



licensed mental health professionals and super- 
vised graduate interns. 

The health educator plays an active role on 
campus, holding workshops and classes and mak- 
ing students aware of ways to promote wellness 
and prevent illness and injury. Students may work 
collaboratively with the health educator as peer 
educators. 

The college offers its own insurance policy, 
underwritten by an insurance company, that cov- 
ers a student in the special circumstances of a 
residential college. It extends coverage for in- 
and outpatient services not covered by many other 
insurance plans. However, this policy does have 
some distinct limitations. Therefore, we strongly 
urge that students having a pre-existing or recur- 
ring medical or psychiatric condition continue 
their precollege health insurance. A student elect- 
ing to waive the college insurance plan must do so 
before the beginning of the first semester and mus 
give her membership number and the name and 
address of the insurance carrier to the treasurer's 
office. Failure to do so will result in automatic 
enrollment in the college health plan. 

We maintain certain regulations in the interest 
of community health as outlined in the college 
handbook and expect all students to comply. Before 
arriving at the college, each student must complete 
her Health Pre-Admission Information Form and 
send it to the Health Services. It is important to note 
that Massachusetts law now mandates that students 
must get the required immunizations before regis- 
tration. Students accepted for a Junior Year Abroad 
Program or who plan to participate in intercolle- 
giate sports or certain exercise and sport programs 
may be required to have a physical exam by a col- 
lege practitioner first. 

Religious Expression 

The dean of religious life encourages and develop! 
the many expressions of spirituality, religious faith 
and ethical reflection that characterize a pluralisti< 
community like Smith's. Assisting the dean are the 
the chaplains to the college and the director of 
voluntary services. The chaplains are dedicated 
to promoting a spirit of mutual respect and inter- 
faith collaboration. They organize weekly gather- 
ings in the Jewish, Muslim, Protestant, Buddhist 



. 



'he Campus and Campus Life 23 

ind Catholic traditions and act as liaisons and ad- 
ders to other religious groups on campus. They 
vork to facilitate the activities of student religious 
>rganizations on campus including: Om, the Hindu 
tudent organization; Al-Iman, the Muslim student 
>rganization; the Newman Association; the Protes- 
ant Ecumenical Christian Church; several medita- 
ion groups; Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship; Key- 
tone Campus Crusade for Christ; the Baha'i Fel- 
owship; the Korean Christian Church; the Episco- 
>al-Lutheran Fellowship; the Eastern Orthodox 
tudent group; and the Association of Smith Pa- 
ans. 

The chapel is also home to a robust musical 
•rogram as well. The College Choirs, the Handbell 
Jioir, the College Glee Club and many visiting mu- 
ical groups as well as faculty and student musi- 
ians offer concerts and occasionally perform at 
worship services. The college organist uses the 
hapel's Aolian-Skinner organ for teaching as well 
s performances. 

A co-op kitchen in Dawes House provides a 
weekly kosher meal for students who observe spe- 
ial dietary laws. 

The Service Organizations of Smith provide long- 
nd short-term community service opportunities and 
iternships with local agencies. 

College policy states that any student who is 
inable because of religious observances to attend 
'lasses or to participate in an examination, study 
ir work on a particular day will be excused from 
uch activities without prejudice and will be given 
n opportunity to make them up, provided such 
nake-up examinations or work does not create an 
mreasonable burden on the college. No fees will 
•e charged for rescheduling an examination. 



24 



The Student Body 



Summary of Enrollment, 2002-03 



UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 





Class of 
2002 


Class of 
2003 


Class of 
2004 


Class of 
2005 


Ada 
Comstock 
Scholars Totals 


Northampton area 1 
Not in residence- 


718 2 

24 


378 
309 


644 

6 


665 



154 2,559 

2 341 


Five College course enrollments at Smith 
First semester 511 
Second semester 685 










GRADUATE STUDENTS 


Full-time 
degree candidates 




Part-time 
degree candidates 


Special students 



In residence 



61 



17 



1 . Guest students are included in the above 
counts. 

2. This includes 66 Ada Comstock Scholars. 

3. Smith students studying in off-campus pro- 
grams and students on leave from the college 
are included in the above totals of students 
"not in residence."' In the Junior Year Abroad 
Programs, there are 23 Smith students in 
Paris; 12 Smith students and three guest stu- 
dents in Hamburg; 22 Smith students and three 



guest students in Geneva; and 24 Smith 
students in Florence. 

In accordance with the Student Right-To-Know ar 
Campus Security Act, the graduation rate for stu- 
dents who entered Smith College as first-year stu- 
dents in September 1995 was 83 percent by May 
2001. (The period covered is equal to 150 perce 
of the normal time for graduation.) 



the Student Body 



25 



Geographical Distribution of Students by Residence, 2001-02 



UNITED STATES 

Alabama 

Alaska 

■zona 

Arkansas 

ialifornia 

iolorado 

lonnecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

daho 

[llinois 

Indiana 

(owa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

.ouisiana 

Vlaine 

Vlaryland 
- Vlassachusetts* 

Vlichigan 

Minnesota 

;Mississippi 

Vlissouri 

viontana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 
^ew Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 
4)hio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virgin Islands 



Virginia 



46 



6 


Washington 


58 


7 


West Virginia 


5 


25 


Wisconsin 


22 


1 


Wyoming 


4 


198 






24 


FOREIGN COUNTRIES 




166 


Bahrain 


1 


7 


Bangladesh 


5 


8 


Bolivia 


1 


70 


Bosnia-Herzegovina 


2 


21 


Brazil 


2 


3 


Bulgaria 


6 


2 


Canada 


8 


47 


Denmark 


1 


26 


England 


1 


16 


Ethiopia 


2 


13 


France 


4 


10 


Germany 


9 


10 


Ghana 


4 


68 


Greece 


3 


50 


Guatemala 


2 


641 


Guyana 


1 


31 


Hong Kong 


1 


46 


India 


13 


2 


Israel 


2 


12 


Italy 


3 


7 


Jamaica 


3 


7 


Japan 


16 


1 


Kuwait 


1 


54 


Latvia 


1 


130 


Lesotho 


1 


4 


Lithuania 


2 


308 


Malaysia 


2 


16 


Malta 


1 


3 


Myanmar 


1 


42 


Namibia 


1 


9 


Nepal 


1 


31 


Netherlands 


1 


96 


Nigeria 


1 


21 


Oman 


1 


10 


Pakistan 


5 


1 


People's Republic of China 


4 


9 


Philippines 


5 


63 


Poland 


3 


12 


Portugal 


1 


91 


Republic of Korea (South) 


23 


1 


Romania 


3 



Russia 


2 


Saudi Arabia 


2 


Scotland 


1 


Senegal 
Serbia 


2 
1 


Singapore 
Slovakia 


2 
1 


South Africa 


2 


Spain 
Sri Lanka 


1 
3 


Sweden 


2 


Switzerland 


1 


Taiwan 


2 


Thailand 


1 


Trinidad and Tobago 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

United Republic of Tanzania 

Vietnam 


2 
4 
1 
1 

1 


Yugoslavia 
Zimbabwe 


1 
1 



* This includes Ada Comstock 
Scholars who move to 
Northampton for the pur- 
pose of their education. 



26 








The Student Body 




Class of 2002 


Class of 


Ada Comstock 




Majors 


(Seniors) 


(Honors) 


2003 


Scholars 


Totals 


Government 


86 


5 


80 


9 


180 


Psychology 


66 


2 


60 


6 


134 


Ait 












Art: Architecture & Urbanism 


7 





5 





12 


Art: History 


26 


2 


16 


2 


46 


Art: Studio 


32 


3 


26 


3 


64 


English Language & Literature 


52 


9 


43 


7 


111 


Economics 


50 


3 


52 





105 


Biological Sciences 


48 


4 


43 


4 


99 


American Studies 


29 


5 


26 


10 


70 


Sociology 


29 


1 


29 


4 


63 


Anthropology 


32 


1 


25 


4 


62 


History- 


22 


2 


26 


1 


51 


Education & Child Study 


24 


1 


20 


4 


49 


Neuroscience 


25 


3 


20 





48 


Computer Science 


16 


3 


23 





42 


Women's Studies 


20 


2 


15 


5 


42 


Mathematics 


22 


1 


13 


2 


38 


Geology 


16 


5 


14 


2 


37 


French 












French Language & Literature 


2 





4 





6 


French Studies 


17 





13 





30 


Spanish & Portuguese 












Latin American Area Studies 


3 





2 





5 


Spanish 


16 





13 


2 


31 


Theatre 


22 





11 





33 


Religion & Biblical Literature 


8 


1 


16 


3 


28 


Biochemistry 


9 





12 


1 


22 


Comparative Literature 


8 


3 


11 





22 


Italian Language & Literature 


12 





10 





22 


Latin American Studies 


8 





12 


1 


21 


Physics 


11 


1 


9 





21 


Philosophy 


8 


3 


9 





20 


Afro-American Studies 


9 


1 


7 


1 


18 


Music 


12 





5 





17 


Chemistry 


5 


3 


6 





14 


Classics 












Classical Studies 


2 





6 





8 


Classics 


2 


1 





1 


4 


Latin 


1 











1 


Russian Language & Literature 












Russian Civilization 


3 


1 


5 





9 


Russian Literature 


1 





2 





3 


East Asian Languages & Cultures 


1 





9 





10 


East Asian Studies 


4 





4 





8 


Sociology & Anthropology 


3 





3 


2 


8 


German Studies 


1 


1 


3 





5 


Astronomy 


2 










3 


Dance 


2 










3 


Medieval Studies 


1 







1 


3 


Smith Scholar 


1 










2 


Creative Writing 













1 


History of Science & Technology 


1 











1 


Linguistics 








1 





1 


Political Economy: Environment 


1 











1 


Recording Arts 


1 











1 


Urban Studies 


1 











1 



27 



Recognition for 
Academic Achievement 



Academic Achievements 

Each year approximately 25 percent of the gradu- 
ating class is awarded the bachelor of arts degree 
m\h Latin Honors and/or departmental honors. 

U.atin Honors 

Latin Honors are awarded to eligible graduating 
seniors on the basis of the cumulative grade point 
average for a minimum of 48 graded credits 
earned during the sophomore, junior and senior 
i/ears. Only grades from Smith College courses and 
zourses taken on the Five College Interchange are 
counted; Smith Junior Year Abroad grades are con- 
sidered Smith grades. No grades from exchange 
Drograms in this country or abroad are counted. 
Pluses and minuses are taken into account; grades 
)f P/F (Pass or Fail) or S/U (Satisfactory or Unsati- 
sfactory) do not enter into the calculations. 

If a student spends one of her sophomore 
hrough senior years away from Smith (with the 
exception of the Smith Junior Year Abroad Pro- 
gram), the grades from the remaining two years 
vill be used. Grades from the first year are never 
counted. The minimum grade point average for 
Latin Honors varies each year depending on the 
Dverall grade distribution in the senior class and is 
lot published. The degree may be awarded cum 
'aude, magna cum laude or summa cum laude 
m the basis of meeting eligibility requirements 
and of a very high level of academic achievement. 

Students who wish to become eligible for Latin 
Honors at graduation must elect at least one 
purse (normally four credits) in each of the 
seven major fields of knowledge listed on pp. 7-8 
(applies to those students who began at Smith in 
September 1994 or later and who graduate in 
J1998 or later). Course listings in this catalogue 
indicate in curly brackets which area(s) of knowl- 
edge a given course covers (see p. 68 for a listing 
3f the designations used for the major fields of 
knowledge). 



Please note that one year of an introductory 
language course or one course at a higher level 
satisfies the foreign language Latin Honors re- 
quirement. Students who are non-native speakers 
of English may, with the permission of a class 
dean, offer any two courses in the English depart- 
ment at the 100 level (or one course at a higher 
level) to satisfy the "foreign language" part of the 
Latin Honors requirement. The class dean will 
notify the registrar that such an arrangement has 
been approved. Any appeals should be sent to the 
dean of the faculty. Non-native speakers of English 
are considered to be those who indicated on their 
advising form that English was not their first lan- 
guage, have had several years of education in a 
school where the language of instruction was 
other than English, and can read, write and speak 
this language. 

Departmental Honors 

A departmental honors program allows a student 
with a strong academic background to do inde- 
pendent and original work in her major. The pro- 
gram provides recognition for students who do 
work of high quality in the preparation of a thesis 
and in courses and seminars. Departmental hon- 
ors students must also fulfill all college and de- 
partmental requirements. 

Successful completion of work in the honors 
program (an honors thesis and at least one hon- 
ors examination) leads to the awarding of the 
bachelor of arts degree with the added notation 
"Honors," "High Honors" or "Highest Honors" 
in the student's major subject. 

First Group Scholars 

Students whose records for the previous year in- 
clude at least 28 credits graded A- or better and 
who have no grades below B- are named First 
Group Scholars. Those named generally represent 
the top 10 percent of the class. 



28 



Recognition for Academic Achievement 



The Dean's List 

The Dean's List for each year names those students 
whose total records for the previous academic 
year average 3-333 or above and include at least 
24 credits for traditional-aged undergraduates or 
16 credits for Ada Comstock Scholars. Students 
must be enrolled at Smith for the full year to be 
named to the Dean's List. 

Society of the Sigma Xi 

In 1935 Smith College became the first women's 
college to be granted a charter for the establish- 
ment of a chapter of the Society of the Sigma Xi. 
Each year the Smith College Chapter elects to 
membership promising graduate students and 
seniors who excel in science. 

Phi Beta Kappa 

The Zeta of Massachusetts Chapter of the Phi Beta 
Kappa Society was established at Smith College in 
1905. Rules of eligibility are established by the 
chapter in accordance with the regulations of the 
national society. Selection is made on the basis of 
overall academic achievement. 

Elections are held twice a year. In the autumn, a 
few seniors are elected on the basis of their aca- 
demic records from the sophomore and junior 
years. Sixty-four credits must be in the calculation 
of the GPA. Only Smith, Five College and Smith Jun- 
ior Year Abroad grades count. At the end of the 
spring semester, more seniors are elected, these on 
the basis of the records from their final three years. 

Candidates for election in the autumn of the 
senior year must have completed at least one four- 
credit semester course in each of the three divi- 
sions; candidates at the end of the senior year 
must have completed at least two such courses in 
each division. Non-Smith courses may qualify in 
this distribution requirement. 

For students who enter Smith College in Sep- 
tember 1994 or later, and who graduate in 1998 
or later, the distribution requirements for Phi Beta 
Kappa will be precisely the same as the college's 
requirements for Latin Honors. Candidates for 
election in the autumn of the senior year will have 
to have completed the identical distribution re- 
quirements by the end of the junior year. Students 
and faculty may consult with the president or the 
secretary of the chapter for more information. 



PsiChi 

The Smith College Chapter of Psi CM was estab- 
lished in 1975. Students majoring or minoring in 
psychology who demonstrate academic excellence 
in both that field and their overall program of 
study are inducted into this national honor society. 
According to the charter, those honored are en- 
joined to develop programs that enhance student 
opportunity to explore the field of psychology. 

Prizes and Awards 

The following prizes are awarded at the Last 
Chapel Awards Convocation on Ivy Day. 

The Academy of American Poets Poetry Prize 

for the best poem or group of poems submitted by 
an undergraduate 

An award from the Connecticut Valley Section 
of the American Chemical Society to a student 
who has done outstanding work in chemistry 

The American Chemical Society Award to a 

junior chemistry major who has excelled in ana- 
lytical chemistry 

The American Chemical Society/Polymer Edu- 
cation Division Undergraduate Award for 

Achievement in Organic Chemistry to a student 
majoring in chemistry who has done outstanding 
work in the organic chemistry sequence 

An award from The American Institute of 
Chemists/Massachusetts Division to an out- 
standing chemist or chemical engineer in the 
graduating class 

The Anita Luria Ascher Memorial Prize to the 

student who has shown the most progress in Ger- 
man during the year 

The Elizabeth Babcock Poetry Prize for the 

best group of poems 

The Sidney Balman Prize for outstanding work 
in the Jewish Studies Program 

The Harriet Dey Barnum Memorial Prize for 

outstanding work in music to the best all-around 
student of music in the senior class 

The Gladys Lampert '28 and Edward 
Beenstock Prize to a snident who excels in ei- 
ther American history or American studies 



senition for Academic Achievement 



29 



the Suzan Rose Benedict Prize to a sophomore 
or excellence in mathematics 

Hie Samuel Bowles Prize for the best paper on 
,in anthropological subject 

rhe Samuel Bowles Prize for the best paper in 
economics 

rhe Samuel Bowies Prize for the best paper on 
i sociological subject 

Hie Kathleen Bostwick Boyden Prize awarded 
:o a member of the Service Organizations of Smith 
,vho has demonstrated the best initiative in her 
olunteer contributions to the Smith College com- 
nunity 

Hie John Everett Brady Prize for excellence in 
he translation of Latin at sight; and for the best 
performance in the beginning Latin course 

Hie Margaret Wemple Brigham Prize to a se- 

lior for excellence in the study of microbiology or 
mmunology 

rhe Prize in British History for a research paper 
ji an upper-level history course on a topic in Brit- 
sh history 

rhe Amey Randall Brown Prize awarded for the 
)est essay on a botanical subject 

Hie Vera Lee Brown Prize for excellence in his- 
ory to a senior majoring in history in regular 
:ourse 

rhe Yvonne Sarah Bernhardt Buerger Prize to 

iie students who have made the most notable con- 
:ribuuon to the dramatic activities of the college 

rhe David Burres Memorial Law Prize to a se- 

lior or an alumna accepted at law school intend- 
ng to practice law in the public interest 

rhe C. Pauline Burt Prize to a senior majoring 
ji chemistry or biochemistry who has an excellent 
record and who has shown high potential for fur- 
:her study in science 

Hie James Gardner Buttrick Prize for the best 
sssay in the field of religion and biblical literature 

rhe Marilyn Knapp Campbell Prize to the stu- 
dent excelling in stage management 

The Michele Cantarella Memorial "Dante 
'Prize" to a Smith College senior for the best essay 
fin Italian on any aspect of The Divine Comedy 



The Carlile Prize for the best original composition 
for carillon; and for the best transcription for caril- 
lon 

The Esther Carpenter Biology Prize in general 
biology to a first-year woman graduate student 

The Julia Harwood Caverno Prize for the best 
performance in the beginning Greek course; and to 
a member of the junior or senior class for excel- 
lence in Greek 

The Eleanor Cederstrom Prize for the best poem by 
an undergraduate written in traditional verse form 

The Cesaire Prize for excellence in an essay or 
other project in French by a junior or senior on 
campus 

The Sidney S. Cohen Prize for outstanding work 
in the field of economics 

The Alison Loomis Cook Prize to a student who 
has made a very significant contribution to the col- 
lege community and to those with whom she has 
been in personal contact 

The Ethel 01 in Corbin Prize to an undergraduate 
for the best original poem or informal essay in En- 
glish 

The CRC Press Introductory Chemistry 
Achievement Award in introductory chemistry 

The Merle Curti Prize for the best piece of writing 
on any aspect of American civilization 

The Dawes Prize for the best undergraduate work 
in political science 

The Alice Hubbard Derby Prize to a member of 
the junior or senior class for excellence in the study 
of Greek literature in the year in which the award is 
made 

The George E. Dimock Prize for the best essay on 
a classical subject submitted by a Smith College 
undergraduate 

The Elizabeth Drew Prize in the Department of 
English Language and Literature for the best fiction 
writing; for the best honors thesis; for the best first- 
year student essay on a literary- subject; and for the 
best classroom essay 

The Amanda Dushkin Prize to a student who has 
maintained a high academic record and who has 
participated in extracurricular activities 



30 



Recognition for Academic Achievement 



The Hazel L. Edgerly Prize to a senior honors 
history student for distinguished work in that 
subject 

The Constance Kambour Edwards Prize to the 

student who has shown the most progress during 
the year in organ 

The Ruth Forbes Eliot Poetry Prize for the best 
poem submitted by a first-year or sophomore 

The Samuel A. Eliot Jr./Julia Heflin Award for 

distinguished directing in the theatre 

The Settie Lehman Fatman Prize for the best 
composition in music, in large form; and in small 
form 

The Heidi Fiore Prize to a senior student of 
singing 

The Eleanor Flexner Prize for the best piece of 
work by a Smith undergraduate using the Sophia 
Smith Collection and the Smith College Archives 

The Harriet R. Foote Memorial Prize for out- 
standing work in botany based on a paper, course 
work, or other contribution to the plant sciences 
at Smith 

The Henry Lewis Foote Memorial Prize for 

excellence in course work in biblical courses 

The Clara French Prize to a senior who has ad- 
vanced furthest in the study of English language 
and literature 

The Helen Kate Furness Prize for the best essay 
on a Shakespearean theme 

The Nancy Boyd Gardner Prize for an outstand- 
ing paper or other project in American studies by 
a Smithsonian intern or American studies major 

The Ida Deck Haigh Memorial Prize to a stu- 
dent of piano for distinguished achievement in 
performance and related musical disciplines 

The Sarah H. Hamilton Memorial Prize 

awarded for an essay on music 

The Arthur Ellis Hamm Prize awarded on the 
basis of the best first-year record 

The Vernon Harward Prize awarded annually to 
the best student scholar of Chaucer 

The James T. and Ellen M. Hatfield Memorial 
Prize for the best short story by a senior majoring 
in English 



The Hause-Scheffer Memorial Prize for the 

senior chemistry major with the best record in that 
subject 

The Ettie Chin Hong '36 Prize to a senior ma- 
joring or minoring in East Asian Languages and 
Literatures who has demonstrated leadership and 
academic achievement and who intends to pursue 
a career in education or service to immigrant and 
needy communities 

The Denis Johnston Playwriting Award for the 

best play or musical written by an undergraduate 
at Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, or Smith 
colleges, or the University of Massachusetts 

The Megan Hart Jones Studio Art Prize for 

judged work in drawing, painting, sculpture, pho- 
tography, graphic arts or architecture 

The Barbara Jordan Award to an African-Ameri- 
can senior or alumna undertaking a career in law 
or public policy, after the example of Texas Con- 
gresswoman Barbara Jordan (1936-1996) 

The Mary Augusta Jordan Prize, an Alumnae 
Association Award, to a senior for the most origi- 
nal piece of literary work in prose or verse com- 
posed during her undergraduate course 

The Peggy Clark Kelley Award in theatre for a 
student demonstrating exceptional achievement in 
fighting, costume or set design 

The Martha Keilig Prize for the best still life or 
landscape in oils on canvas 

The John and Edith Knowles Memorial Award 

to a student of outstanding merit who has elected 
to pursue a medical career and who has displayed 
qualities that might lead her to become a thought- 
ful and humane critic of her chosen profession 

The Florence Corliss Lamont Prize, a medal 
awarded for work in philosophy 

The Norma M. Leas, Class of 1930, Memoria 
Prize to a graduating English major for excellent 
in written English 

The Phyllis Williams Lehmann Travel Award 

to a graduating senior majoring in art history, wit] 
preference given to students interested in studyin; 
classical (Greek or Roman) art at the graduate 
level 



i 



Recognition for Academic Achievement 



51 



iThe Ruth Alpern Leipziger Award to an out- 
standing French major participating in the Junior 
Year Abroad Program in Paris 

The Barbara A. Liskin M.D.. Class of 1974, 
Prize to an outstanding Smith senior psychology 
major interested in the field of psychiatry 

The Jill Cummins MacLean Prize to a drama 
major for outstanding dramatic achievement with 
a comic touch in writing, acting or dance 

The Emogene Mahony Memorial Prize for the 

best essay on a literary subject written by a first- 
vear student; and the best honors thesis submitted 
o the Department of English Language and Litera- 
ture 

The Emogene Mahony Memorial Prize for pro- 
ficiency at the organ 

Hie Jeanne McFarland Prize for excellent work 
in women's studies 

The John S. Mekeel Memorial Prize to a senior 
for outstanding work in philosophy 

The Bert Mendelson Prize to a sophomore for 
excellence in computer science; and to a senior 
majoring in computer science for excellence in 
that subject 

The Thomas Corwin Mendenhall Prize for an 

iessay evolving from any history course, excluding 
special studies, seminars and honors long papers 

Hie Samuel Michelman Memorial Prize, given 
in his memory by his wife, to a senior from 
Northampton or Hatfield who has maintained a 
distinguished academic record and contributed to 
the life of the college 

The Mineralogical Society of America Under- 
graduate Award for excellence in the field of 
mineralogy 

rhe Elizabeth Montagu Prize for the best essay 
on a literarv subject concerning women 

rhe Juliet Evans Nelson Award to graduating 
seniors for their contributions to the Smith com- 
munitv and demonstrated commitment to campus 

kfe 

The Newman Association Prize for outstanding 
leadership, dedication and service to the Newman 
Association at Smith College 



The Josephine Ott Prize, established in 1992 by 
former students and friends, to a Smith junior in 
Paris or Geneva for her commitment to the French 
language and European civilization 

The Arthur Shattuck Parsons Memorial Prize 

to the student with the outstanding paper in socio- 
logical theory or its application 

The Adeline Devor Penberthy, Class of 1945, 
Memorial Prize in Engineering to a sophomore 
student for her outstanding contributions toward 
building a community of learners within the 
Picker Engineering Program 

The Ann Kirsten Pokora Prize to a senior with a 
distinguished academic record in mathematics 

The Sarah Winter Pokora Prize to a senior who 
has excelled in athletics and academics 

The Judith Raskin Memorial Prize for the out- 
standing senior voice student 

The Elizabeth Killian Roberts Prize for the best 
drawing by an undergraduate 

The IVlollie Rogers/Newman Association Prize 

to a student who has demonstrated a dedication to 
humanity and a clear vision for translating that 
dedication into service that fosters peace and jus- 
tice among people of diverse cultures 

The Eleanor B. Rothman Prize to a graduating 
Ada Comstock Scholar who will pursue a graduate 
degree and who has shown an interest in the Ada 
Comstock Scholars Program and in Smith College 

The Department of Russian Prize for the best 
essay on Russian literature by a senior majoring in 
Russian 

The Victoria Louise Schrager Prize to a senior 
who has maintained a distinguished academic 
record and has also taken an important part in 
student activities 

The Larry C. Selgelid Memorial Prize for out- 
standing work in the field of economics by a Smith 
senior 

The Donald H. Sheehan Memorial Prize for 

outstanding work in American studies 

The Andrew C. Slater Prize for excellence in 
debate; and for most improved debater 



52 



Recognition for Academic Achievement 



The Denton M. Snyder Acting Prize to a Smith 
senior who has demonstrated distinguished acting 
in the theatre 

The Deborah Sosland-Edelman Prize to a senior 
for outstanding leadership in the Jewish commu- 
nity at Smith and valuable contribution to Smith 
College campus life 

The Department of Spanish and Portuguese 
Prize for distinguished work by a Spanish major 

The Gertrude Posner Spencer Prize for excel- 
lence in writing nonfiction prose; and for excel- 
lence in writing fiction 

The Nancy Cook Steeper '59 Prize to a gradu- 
ating senior who, through involvement with the 
Alumnae Association, has made a significant con- 
tribution to building connections between Smith 
alumnae and current students 

The Valeria Dean Burgess Stevens Prize for 

excellent work in women's studies 

The Mary Ellen Szmkowiak Prize awarded on 
the basis of merit to a premedical student enroll- 
ing in medical school 

The William Sentman Taylor Prize for signifi- 
cant work in human values, a quest for truth, 
beauty and goodness in the arts and sciences 

The Rosemary Thomas Poetry Prize for the 

best group of poems; and for the best individual 
poem 

The Tryon Prize to a Smith or Five College under- 
graduate for the best piece of writing on a work or 
works of art in the museum 

The Ruth Dietrich Tuttle Prize to encourage 
further study, travel or research in the areas of 
international relations, race relations or peace 
studies 

The Unity Award of the Office of Multicultural 
Affairs to the student who has made an outstanding 
contribution toward promoting diversity and 
multiculturalism in the Smith College community 

The Anacleta C. Vezzetti Prize to a senior for 
the best piece of writing in Italian on any aspect of 
the culture of Italy 

The Voltaire Prize to a sophomore at Smith Col- 
lege for an essay or other project in French that 
shows originality and engagement with her subject 



The Karel Fierman Wahrsager Award in Soci- 
ology to a student who has demonstrated a high 
level of scholarship, intellectual promise and lead- 
ership 

The Ernst Wallfisch Prize to a student of music 
for outstanding talent, commitment and diligence 

The Louise M. Walton Prize to an Ada Comstock 
Scholar studying art history or studio art whose 
dedication to the field is notable 

The Frank A. Waterman Prize to a senior who 
has done excellent work in physics 

The Wayne and Sally White Prize for excellent 
work by a student majoring in education and child 
study 

The Jochanan H. A. Wijnhoven Prize for the 

best essay on a subject in the area of Jewish reli- 
gious thought written for a course in the Depart- 
ment of Religion and Biblical Literature or in the 
Program for Jewish Studies 



Fellowships 



International and Domestic 
Fellowships 

Students with high academic achievement are en- 
couraged to apply for international and domestic 
fellowships through the college. For undergradu- 
ates, the college facilitates international opportuni- 
ties such as the Boren Scholarship (formerly 
NSEP) , while rising seniors may apply for the 
Rhodes Scholarship, the Gates Scholarship, the 
British Marshall Scholarship, the George Mitchell 
Scholarship, the Fulbright Scholarship, the DAAD 
or German Academic Exchange Program grant, 
and the Luce Scholars Program. 

The college also administers several domestic 
fellowships, among them the Harry Truman Schol- 
arship, the Morris K. Udall Scholarship, the Melloi 
Fellowships in Humanistic Studies, the Beinecke 
Scholarship and others. 

Information on international and domestic 
fellowships is available from the coordinator for 
fellowships and grants at the Office for Interna- 
tional Study. 



33 



Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 



A Smith college education is a lifetime investment. 
It is also a financial challenge for many families. At 
Smith, we encourage all qualified students to apply 
for admission regardless of family financial re- 
sources. Our students come from a wide range of 
socio-economic backgrounds. The Office of Stu- 
dent Financial Services has an experienced staff to 
assist students and parents in both the individual 
financial aid application process and the educa- 
tional financing process in general. We work with 
families from all walks of life to help them manage 
the financial challenge in a variety of ways, through 
financial aid, loans, payment plans and other fi- 
nancing options. 

Many Smith students receive financial assis- 
tance to pay for college expenses. Smith College 
participates in the major federal and state student 
aid programs while funding a substantial institu- 
tional grant and scholarship program from its en- 
dowment. In 2001-02, 69 percent of enrolled 
undergraduate students received some type of fi- 
nancial aid (grants, scholarships, loans or work 
study) . The average total aid package was in excess 
of $22,000. Grant assistance was awarded to 59 
percent of enrolled undergraduates. 

We realize that financing a college education is 
a complex process and we encourage applicants 
and their families to communicate directly with us. 
Our experienced educational financing staff in the 
Office of Student Financial Services is available to 
work with you. For factual information on the ap- 
plication process, we operate a toll free number 
(1-800-221-2579) from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Mon- 
day through Thursday, and from 10 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. on Friday between January 15 and May 15. 
Inquiries may also be made by calling the direct 
office number 413-585-2530 between 8:30 a.m. 
and 4:30 p.m. (Eastern time). Send e-mail com- 
munications to SFS@smith.edu. We also maintain a 
web site at www.smith.edu/finaid. 



Your Student Account 

Smith College considers the student to be respon- 
sible for ensuring that payments — whether from 
loans, grants, parents, or third parties — are re- 
ceived in a timely manner. The Office of Student 
Financial Services Statements manages processing 
of the student account. Initial statements detailing 
semester fees are mailed on or about July 10 and 
December 10. Monthly statements will be mailed 
to the student's permanent mailing address on or 
about the 10th of each month. 

Payment of charges for the fall semester is due 
August 5 (September 5 for international students) ; 
payment for spring semester is due January 6 
(February 5 for international students) . Checks 
should be made payable to Smith College. Bal- 
ances not covered by anticipated financial aid that 
remain unpaid after the due date may be subject 
to late fees. 

The college expects the student to fulfill her 
financial responsibility' and reserves the right to 
place limitations on the student for failure to do 
so. The consequences of nonpayment include be- 
ing prevented from participation in the house de- 
cision/room lottery process, registration for future 
semester courses, receipt of academic transcripts, 
receipt of diploma at commencement and ap- 
proval of a leave of absence. The college also re- 
serves the right to have the student administratively 
withdrawn and may refer such account for collec- 
tion in her name. Students and parents are wel- 
come to contact the Office of Student Financial 
Services for assistance in meeting payment 
responsiblities. 

Credit balance refunds are issued direcdy by 
check in the student's name, except for those 
which result from a PLUS or MEFA loan in which 
case they are issued to the parent borrower. With 
the student's written release, credit balance re- 
funds may be issued to the parent or the designee 
of the student. 



34 



Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 



Fees 



2002-03 Comprehensive Fee (required institutional fees)* 




Fall Semester 


Spring Semester 


Total 


Tuition 


$12,890 


$12,890 


$25,780 


Room** 


2,255 


2,255 


4,510 


Board** 


2,220 


2,220 


4,440 


Student activities fee 


103 


103 


206 


Comprehensive fee 


$17,468 


$17,468 


$34,936 



* Comprehensive fees for 2002-03 can be found in the Investing in a Smith Education, 2002-03 
brochure, available from either the Office of Financial Aid or the Office of Admission. This informa- 
tion is also posted on the World Wide Web at ww.smith.edu/iinaid. 

** Room and board will be billed as a combined charge of $4,475 each semester, or a total of $8,950 
for 2002-03. 

As part of her expenses, a student should be prepared to spend a minimum of $600 per year on books 
and academic supplies. In addition, a student will incur additional expenses during the academic year 
that will vary according to her accustomed standard of living, personal needs, recreational activities and 
number of trips home. 



FEE FOR NONMATRICULATED STUDENT 

Per course for credit $3,240 

FEES FOR ADA COMSTOCK SCHOLARS 

Application fee $50 

Transient Housing (per semester) 

Room only (per night) $290 

Room and full meal plan (per night) $635 

Tuition per semester 

1-7 credits $810 per credit 

8-11 credits $6,480 

12-15 credits $9,720 

16 or more credits $12,890 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES FEE 

The $206 student activities fee is split between the 
two semesters and is used to fund chartered stu- 
dent organizations on campus. The Student Gov- 
ernment Association allocates the monies each 
year. Each spring, the Senate Finance Committee of 
the SGA proposes a budget that is voted on by the 
student body. 



2002-03 Optional Fees 

STUDENT MEDICAL INSURANCE— $1,120 
[ESTIMATED— FIGURE NOT YET FINAL] 

The $1,120 [estimated] Student Medical Insur- 
ance fee is split between the two semesters and 
covers the student from August 15 through the 
following August 14. Massachusetts law requires 
that each student have adequate health insurance, 
so Smith College offers a medical insurance plan 
through Koster Insurance. Details about the insur- 
ance are mailed during the summer. A student is 
automatically billed for insurance, but has the 
option to cancel enrollment in the plan if she can 
demonstrate comparable coverage. A student will 
have until August 10 to cancel enrollment in the 
college insurance for the 2002-03 academic year.| 
If a student is on leave on a Smith-approved pro- 
gram that is billed at home-school fees, the cost 
for the Student Medical Insurance will be $798 fo 
2002-03. 



'ees, Expenses and Financial Aid 



55 



VIASSPIRG— $12 

Hie $12 MassPIRG fee is approved by a vote of the 
student body. It funds the Massachusetts Public 
Interest Research Group, a nonprofit environmen- 
al and consumer organization. A student has the 
)ption to have the fee canceled, if requested. 

Mier Fees and Charges 

\PPLICATION FOR ADMISSION— $50 

[Tie application fee, which helps defray the cost of 
landling all the paperwork and administrative 
•eview involved with all applicants, must accom- 
>any the application form. An applicant must send 
he fee and form to the Office of Admission prior 
o January 15. An applicant to the Ada Comstock 
>cholars Program must submit the fee and Part A 
)f the Application for Admission to the Ada 
Comstock office prior to February 1. 

ENROLLMENT DEPOSIT— $300 

Jpon admittance, a new student pays an enroll- 
nent deposit which serves to reserve her place in 
:lass and a room if she will reside in campus 
lousing. $100 representing a general deposit 
:omponent is held until six months after the stu- 
lent graduates from the college. The $100 is re- 
unded only after deducting any unpaid fees or 
ines and is not refunded to a student who with- 
Iraws (including an admitted student who does 
lot attend); $200 representing a room deposit 
:omponent is credited $100 in July toward her fall 
emester charges; and $100 in December toward 
ler spring semester charges. 

^E FOR MUSICAL INSTRUCTION— $450 PER 
SEMESTER (ONE HOUR LESSON PER WEEK) 

lattice rooms are available to Smith College stu- 
ients with first preference given to those regis- 
ered for music instruction. Other Five College 
tudents may apply to the chair of the music de- 
>artment for permission to use the facilities. Prac- 
ice rooms may be available for use by other indi- 
iduals in last order of preference upon successful 
ipplication to the chair of the music department 
ind the payment of a fee. 

The previous music instruction charges in- 
:lude the use of practice rooms. Upon application 
o the chair of the music department and subject 
o availability, the practice rooms are available for 
lse by other individuals. The following schedule of 
ees will apply: 



Use of a practice room, one hour daily 

$25 per year 

Use of a practice room, one hour daily, 

and of a college instrument $ 50 per year 

Use of organ, one hour daily $100 per year 

FEE FOR RIDING CLASSES PER SEMESTER 

Adjacent to the Smith campus is Fox Meadow 
Farm, where riding lessons are available to ail 
students at the college. Fox Meadow Farm will also 
board horses for students, at a cost of $430 per 
month. Inquiries about boarding should be ad- 
dressed to Sue Payne, c/o Smith College Riding 
Stables. The Smith intercollegiate riding team uses 
their facilities for practice and for horse shows. 
The fees listed below are per semester and are 
payable directly to Fox Meadow Farm when a stu- 
dent registers for lessons each semester. 

Two lessons per week $410 

STUDIO ART COURSES PER SEMESTER 

Certain materials and supplies are required for 
studio art courses and will be provided to each 
student. Students may require additional supplies 
as well and will be responsible for purchasing 
them directly. The expenses will vary from course 
to course and from student to student. 

Required materials $20-$150 

Additional supplies $15— $100 

CHEMISTRY LABORATORY COURSE PER SEMESTER 

$6— $25 plus breakage 

CONTINUATION FEE 

$50 per semester 

Students on leave of absence or attending other 
institutions on exchange or junior year abroad 
programs will be assessed a continuation fee to 
maintain enrollment status at the college. 

LATE FEE 

Any payment made after August 5 for fall (Septem- 
ber 1 for international students) or January 5 for 
spring (January 2 1 for international students) will 
be considered late. Late payments may be assessed 
a late fee. 

EARLY ARRIVAL FEE— $25 PER DAY 
LATE CENTRAL CHECK-IN FEE— $50 

Returning students who do not participate in Cen- 
tral Check-In will be assessed a fee. 



36 



Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 



LATE REGISTRATION FEE— $25 

Students who make registration changes after the 
registration period will be assessed a fee for each 
change. 

BED REMOVAL FEE— $100 

Students who remove their beds from their cam- 
pus rooms will be charged a bed removal fee. 

HEALTH/FIRE/SAFETY VIOLATION— $5 PER ITEM 

A minimum fine of $5 per item will be charged for 
items left in public areas such as corridors, stair- 
ways, entrances, etc. These items create a hazard 
and violate compliance with the Americans with 
Disabilities Act, as well as city and state building, 
fire, and safety codes. 

Institutional Refund Policy 

A refund must be calculated if a student has with- 
drawn on or after the first day of classes, but be- 
fore the point when the college is considered to 
have earned all the tuition, room, board, and man- 
datory fees (hereinafter called institutional 
charges) for which the student was charged. A 
withdrawal fee of $100 will be charged in addition 
to any refund calculation made. Credit balances 
remaining on any account will be refunded. 

ADJUSTMENT OF INSTITUTIONAL CHARGES AND 
INSTITUTIONAL AID 

Any student who withdraws prior to the first day of 
classes will receive a 100 percent adjustment of 
institutional charges, insurance and MassPIRG. All 
disbursed Title IV aid, institutional aid, state and 
other aid will be returned to the appropriate ac- 
count by the college. 

A student who withdraws after the first day of 
classes, but before the time when she will have 
completed 60 percent of the period of enrollment, 
will have her institutional charges and institutional 
aid adjusted based on the percent of attendance. 

If a student should withdraw from a Junior 
Year Abroad Program during the course of the 
year, it is college policy not to grant credit for less 
than a full year's work and to refund only those 
payments for board and room which may be re- 
covered by the college. Tuition charges for the 
year are not refundable. Normally, students who 
withdraw from a Junior Year Abroad Program are 



withdrawn from Smith and may not return to the 
college the following semester. 

STUDENTS RECEIVING TITLE IV FEDERAL AID 

Per federal regulations, a student earns her aid 
based on the period of time she remained en- 
rolled. Unearned Title IV funds, other than Federal 
Work Study, must be returned to the appropriate 
federal agency. During the first 60 percent of the 
enrollment period, a student earns Title IV funds 
in direct proportion to the length of time she re- 
mains enrolled. A student who remains enrolled 
beyond the 60 percent point earns all the aid for 
the payment period. For example, if the period of 
enrollment is 100 days and the student completes 
25 days, then she has earned 25 percent of her 
aid. The remainder of the aid must be returned to 
the appropriate federal agency. 

OTHER CHARGES 

If a student has not waived the student medical 
insurance and withdraws 30 days or less into the 
semester, the charge for insurance will be can- 
celed if no claims have been submitted. After 30 
days, the charge will not be canceled. 
Other charges, such as library fines, parking 
fines, and infirmary charges are not adjusted upon 
the student's withdrawal. 

Contractual Limitations 

If Smith College's performance of its educational 
objectives, support services, or lodging and food 
services is hampered or restrained on account of 
strikes, fire, shipping delays, acts of God, prohibi- 
tion or restraint of governmental authority; or 
other similar causes beyond Smith College's con- 
trol, Smith College shall not be liable to anyone, 
except to the extent of allowing in such cases a 
pro-rata reduction in fees or charges already paid 
to Smith College. 

Payment Plans and Loan 
Options 

Smith is pleased to offer a variety of financing op- 
tions to assist you in successfully planning for 
timely payment of your college bill. Included in 



Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 



37 



ithese offerings are a select group of payment plans 
and loan options. 

Smith's payment plans allow you to distribute 
payments over a specific period. 

• the Semester Plan 

• the TuitionPay Monthly Plan (administered by 

Academic Management Services) 

• Prepaid Stabilization Plan 

Smith also offers a select group of parent loan 
options. 

Details on loan options and payment plans can 
be found in A Guide to Financing, which is avail- 
able from the Office of Student Financial Services. 

This information is also available on the World 
Wide Web at wvvw.smith.edu/finaid. 



Financial Aid 



We welcome students from all economic back- 
grounds, and we make every effort to fully aid all 
admitted undergraduates with documented need. 
Awards are offered to applicants on the basis of 
computed need. An award is usually a combination 
of a grant, a campus job and a suggested loan. 

No woman should hesitate to apply to Smith 
because of an inability to pay the entire cost of edu- 
cation at a private college. Smith will make every 
effort to meet fully the documented financial need, 
as calculated by the college, of all admitted students. 
College policy prohibits granting any Smith funds 
beyond the level of billed fees. Women from all eco- 
nomic backgrounds are encouraged to apply. 

Smith College is committed to a very generous 
financial aid policy that guarantees to meet the full 
financial need, as calculated by the college, of all 
admitted students. The evaluation of admission 
applicants is based strictly on the academic and 
personal qualities of each applicant, with no con- 
sideration to financial need. Full aid packages are 
Dffered to students with the highest ratings until the 
aid budget is exhausted. If the class is not yet com- 
plete, some decisions on the margin may take into 
account the amount of financial aid required to 
aiUy fund the student. In the past few years, ap- 
proximately 1 to 4 percent of the applicant pool has 
been affected by this policy, although many of those 
students were later admitted from the wait fist with 
aill financial aid. Thus the college continues to be 
*ieed-blind for over 90 percent of the applications 



to Smith. Please note that institutional financial aid 
is not available to students who do not meet the 
published deadlines. 

To determine a student's need, a family 
completes both the Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (FAFSA) and the College Scholarship 
Service PROFILE form, requesting that copies be 
sent to Smith. The FAFSA and PROFILE registration 
forms are available in December from high 
school guidance offices and from our Office of 
Student Financial Services. Both forms may be 
completed on-fine. The PROFILE can be found 
at wwvv.collegeboard.org, and the FAFSA can be 
found at www.fafsa.ed.gov 

An applicant and her family must also complete 
and file the Smith financial aid application that 
comes as part of the application package from the 
Office of Admission. It should be mailed directly to 
the Office of Student Financial Services with a copy 
of the family's tax returns, including all schedules 
and W-2's, for the prior year. Once we receive the 
output from an applicant's completed FAFSA and 
PROFILE, we review each student's file individually, 
realizing fully that the forms represent people's 
lives. We take into consideration the number of 
dependents, the number of family members in col- 
lege, divorced parents and other special circum- 
stances. We will require signed copies of parents' 
and students' most recent federal income tax re- 
turns to verily all the financial information before 
we credit awards to a student's account. Interna- 
tional students should request special applications 
from the Office of Admission, and an official gov- 
ernment statement or income tax return will be 
required to verify income. 

The college makes the final decision on the 
level of need and awards. Financial aid decisions to 
entering students are announced simultaneously 
with admission notifications. 

A student who is awarded aid at entrance will 
have it renewed according to her need, as calcu- 
lated by the college, if she is in good academic 
standing. She and her family apply for aid annually 
with Smith College forms, R\FSA and PROFILE 
forms, and tax returns. The amount of aid may 
change from year to year depending on changes 
in college fees and in the family's financial circum- 
stances. The balance of loan and grant also 
changes, based on federal loan limits. Materials 
and instructions for renewing aid are made avail- 



38 



Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 



able to all students in early December. Students are 
expected to complete their undergraduate studies 
in eight semesters, and grant aid is limited to that 
period, except for special programs. Ada Comstock 
Scholars receiving financial aid are required to 
make satisfactory progress toward the degree in 
order to continue receiving aid — that is, comple- 
tion of at least 75 percent of all credits attempted 
in any academic year. Students not meeting this 
criterion are put on financial aid probation and 
may become ineligible for aid if the probationary 
period exceeds one year. Further information is 
available in the Office of Student Financial Services. 
Unless the administrative board decides that miti- 
gating circumstances warrant an exception, no 
federal student aid may be made available to a 
student who is not making satisfactory progress 
toward the degree (see p. 52). 

First-Year Applicants 

Any student who needs help in financing her edu- 
cation should apply for financial aid at the time 
she applies for admission. The financial aid appli- 
cation requirements are sent to all applicants for 
admission. Students must not wait until they have 
been accepted for admission to apply for aid. Each 
student's file is carefully reviewed to determine 
eligibility for need-based aid. Since this is a de- 
tailed process, the college expects students to fol- 
low published application guidelines and to meet 
the appropriate application deadlines. Students 
and parents are encouraged to contact the Office 
of Student Financial Services with questions. De- 
tailed information on the application process and 
deadlines is available on our Web site at 
www. smith . edu/finaid. 

The consequences of not applying for aid prior 
to being accepted for admission include a 64- 
credit waiting period before becoming eligible 
to receive college grant aid. This means that only 
federal, state and private assistance would be 
available for the first two years of undergraduate 
enrollment at Smith. The college will consider 
exceptions to this policy only if you experience 
and can document an unexpected family emer- 
gency. Please note that this policy does not pertain 
to students who, at the time of admission to Smith, 
applied for but were not granted need-based 
financial aid. 



If an entering student applied for but did not 
qualify for need-based aid in her first year, that 
student may reapply for aid in subsequent years. 
This is particularly important for families that ex- 
perience changes in family circumstances such as 
a sibling entering college, reductions in parent 
income or unanticipated medical expenses. Re- 
turning students who want to apply for federal aid 
only have a modified application process. If there 
are major changes to the financial resources of the 
family, the Office of Student Financial Services will 
consider a new request for aid or a review of a 
previous denial at any time. 

If you enroll at Smith College and your parents 
decide not to assume their expected responsibility 
for college expenses, the college cannot assume 
that responsibility. There are limited circum- 
stances that qualify a student for consideration 
as an independent aid applicant. Women over 
the age of 24, orphans and wards of the court are 
always considered self-supporting for financial aid 
purposes. 

Transfer Students 

Transfer students should follow the same applica- 
tion procedures detailed on their specific financial 
aid applications. Transfer students who do not 
apply for aid at the time of admission cannot apply 
for college aid until they reach junior standing and 
complete at least 32 credits at Smith. 

Ada Comstock Scholars 

Women of nontraditional college age can apply to 
the Ada Comstock Scholars Program. Applicants 
for aid should complete a Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) , a Smith Application 
for Aid, and send us a copy of their most recent 
federal tax return. 

An Ada Comstock Scholar who does not apply 
for aid at the time of admission cannot apply for 
institutional grant aid until she has completed 32 
credits at Smith, although she may qualify for fed- 
eral and state grants and loans before she has 
completed 32 credits. This policy does not apply 
to women who applied for, but were not granted, 
aid at the time of admission. 



Fees 



Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 



39 



International Applicants and Non-U.S. 
Citizens 

Smith College awards need-based aid to non-U.S. 
citizens, both first-year and transfer applicants. The 
pool is highly competitive for these funds and the 
level of support provided from the college ranges 
widely, depending on particular family circum- 
stances. Aid is determined based on the informa- 
tion provided by the family on the Smith Financial 
Aid Application for Non-U.S. Citizens, along with 
translated tax or income statements 

The application deadline is the same as the 
application deadline for admission: February 1. 

A non-U.S. citizen eligible for aid is offered a 
grant award in the first year that is guaranteed to 
remain at the same level each year she is at Smith. 
(Loan and campus job amounts, which are part of 
the total aid package, will increase by $900 per 
year to offset increases in tuition, fees, room and 
board.) 

For application deadlines and details, please 
check http://www.smith.edu/finaid. 

NON-U.S. CITIZENS LIVING IN THE U.S. 

If you are a non-U.S. citizen whose parents are 
earning income and paying taxes in the United 
States, you will need to complete a CSS PROFILE 
form as well as the Smith Financial Aid Application 
for Non-U.S. Citizens and provide U.S. federal in- 
come tax returns. 

U.S. CITIZENS LIVING OUTSIDE THE U.S. 

Fill out the Smith Application for Freshman Finan- 
cial Aid and follow procedures for applicants resid- 
ing in the United States. However, if your parents 
are living and earning income outside the United 
States and do not file U.S. tax returns, you should 
also fill out the Smith Financial Aid Application for 
Non-U.S. Citizens so that we can consider the actual 
expenses incurred by your family. 

U.S. citizens and permanent residents must 
reapply for aid each year. 

Financial Aid Awards 

Smith s resources for financial aid include loans, 
campus jobs and grants; a student's financial aid 
package will include one or more of these. A loan 



and job, both considered self-help, are usually the 
first components of an aid package, with any re- 
maining need being met with grant aid. 

LOANS 

Most students borrow through the Federal Direct 
Ford Loan Program. Federal Perkins Loans are 
offered to students to the extent of available federal 
funding. Most parents are eligible to borrow under 
the Federal Parent Loan Program and/or may make 
use of one of the plans described in A Guide to 
Financing. Students who receive aid of any sort 
from federal funds are subject to the statutes gov- 
erning such aid. 

CAMPUS JOBS 

The Office of Student Financial Services administers 
campus jobs. All students may apply, but priority is 
given to those students (about one-half of our stu- 
dent body) who received campus job offers as part 
of their aid packages. First-year students usually 
work an average of eight hours a week for 32 
weeks, usually for Residence and Dining Services. 
Students in other classes hold regular jobs averag- 
ing 10 hours a week for 32 weeks. These monies 
are paid directly to each student as she earns them. 
They are intended primarily to cover personal ex- 
penses, but some students use part of their earn- 
ings toward required fees. Short-term jobs are 
open to all students. Additionally, a term-time in- 
ternship program is administered by the Career 
Development Office. The college participates in 
the federally funded College Work-Study Program, 
which funds a portion of the earnings of eligible 
students, some of them in nonprofit, community 
service positions. 

GRANTS 

Grants are funds given to students with no require- 
ment of repayment or work time in exchange. Most 
Smith College grants come from funds given for 
this purpose by alumnae and friends of the college 
and by foundations and corporations. The federal 
and state governments also provide assistance 
through need-based grants such as the Federal Pell 
Grant and state scholarships. Smith receives an 
allocation each year for Federal Supplemental Edu- 
cational Opportunity Grants and for state-funded 
Gilbert Grants for Massachusetts residents. 



40 



Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 



Outside Aid 

If you receive any assistance from an organization 
outside of the college, this aid must be taken into 
consideration in calculating your financial aid 
award. For this reason, you are required to report 
such aid. 

Most outside scholarships are given to recog- 
nize particular achievement on the part of the re- 
cipient. These awards are allowed to reduce the 
suggested loan, job or family contribution. How- 
ever, in no case will the family contribution be 
reduced below the federally calculated contribu- 
tion. When outside awards have replaced the sug- 
gested loan and job, and the family contribution 
has been reduced to the federally calculated level, 
Smith grant aid will be reduced dollar for dollar. 

Entitlement awards from state or federal 
sources as well as tuition subsidies based on par- 
ents' employment are not covered by the policy 
and reduce Smith grant dollar for dollar. 

Benefits from rehabilitation agencies are 
treated in a slightly different manner. Rehabilita- 
tion assistance for books goes directly to the stu- 
dent and does not affect any of the aid package. 
One-half of other rehabilitation benefits will be 
used to replace the suggested loan and one-half 
will replace the Smith grant. 

The Office of Financial Aid must be notified of 
all outside awards. If you notify us by June 1, the 
aid will be reflected in your official award and on 
your first bill. If you notify us after September 1 , 
the outside aid may be used to reduce the Smith 
grant dollar for dollar. 



Music Scholarships 

Each year the college awards scholarships equal 
to $250 per year for the cost of lessons in practi- 
cal music to students who have financial need and 
who are accepted by the Department of Music. 
An additional scholarship supports the full cost 
of lessons in practical music to be assigned as 
follows: 

THE ERNST WALLFISCH SCHOLARSHIP IN MUSIC 

A full-year music performance scholarship 
(vocal or instrumental) , based on merit and com- 
mitment, to be granted by the Music Department 
to a Smith student (first-year, sophomore or jun- 
ior) enrolled in a performance course at Smith 
College. 

Scholarships for Northampton and 
Hatfield Residents 

At the discretion of the trustees, partial tuition 
grants may be awarded to accepted applicants 
who have been residents of Northampton or 
Hatfield with their parents for at least five years 
directly preceding the date of their admission to 
college. Such grants are continued through the 
four college years if the student maintains diploma 
grade, conforms to the regulations of the college, 
and continues to be a resident of Northampton or 
Hatfield. 



41 



Admission 



From the college's beginning, students at 
Smith have been challenged by rigorous 
academic standards and supported by 
rich resources and facilities to develop 
to their fullest potential and define their 
own terms of success. Admitting students who will 
thrive in the Smith environment remains the goal 
of our admission efforts. We seek students who 
will be productive members of the Smith commu- 
nity, who will be challenged by all that is offered 
here, and who will challenge their faculty mem- 
bers and peers to sharpen their ideas and per- 
spectives of the world. 

Each year we enroll a first-year class of ap- 
proximately 640 able, motivated, diverse students 
whose records show academic achievement, intel- 
lectual curiosity and potential for growth. Because 
our students come from virtually every state and 
more than 60 foreign countries, their educational 
and personal experiences and opportunities vary 
tremendously. In selecting a class, the Board of 
Admission, which is made up of faculty members 
as well as members of the admission and adminis- 
trative staffs, considers each student in the light of 
the opportunities available to her. Included in the 
boards review are her secondary school record, 
the recommendations from her school, her Col- 
lege Board SAT I and SAT II tests, or ACT and any 
other available information. Of critical importance 
is the direct communication we have with each 
student through her writing on the application and 
through a personal interview. It is as important for 
us to get to know each student as it is for her to 
get to know the college. 

Smith College makes even' effort to meet fully 
the documented financial need, as calculated by 
the college, of all admitted students. Two-thirds of 
our students receive some form of financial assis- 
tance through grants, loans and/or campus jobs. 
Further information about financial planning for a 
Smith education and about financial aid is avail- 
able in the section on Fees, Expenses and Finan- 
cial Aid, pages 33-40. 



Secondary School 
Preparation 

There is no typical applicant to Smith and no typi- 
cal academic program, but we strongly recom- 
mend that a student prepare for Smith by taking 
the strongest courses offered by her high school. 
Specifically this should include the following, 
where possible: 

• four years of English composition and 
literature 

• three years of a foreign language (or two years 
in each of two languages) 

• three years of mathematics 

• three years of science 

• two years of history 

Beyond meeting the normal minimum require- 
ments, we expect each candidate to pursue in 
greater depth academic interests of special impor- 
tance to her. Candidates who are interested in our 
engineering major should pursue coursework in 
calculus, biology; chemistry and physics. 

Smith College will accept college-level work 
completed prior to matriculation as a degree 
student, provided that the relevant courses were 
completed at an accredited college or university 
and were not applied to the requirements for 
high school graduation. We also give credit for 
excellent performance in Advanced Placement, 
International Baccalaureate and equivalent foreign 
examinations. Please refer to the Academic Rules 
and Procedures section for further information 
regarding eligibility for and use of such credit. 

Entrance Tests 

We require each applicant to take the Scholastic 
Assessment Test (SAT I) or the American College 
Test (ACT). SAT II: Subject Tests, especially the one 
in Writing, are strongly recommended but not 
required. She should select two others in fields 
where she has particular interests and strong 



42 



Admission 



preparation. We recommend that a candidate take 
the examinations in her junior year to keep open 
the possibility of Early Decision and to help her 
counselors advise her appropriately about college. 
All examinations taken through January of the 
senior year are acceptable. The results of exami- 
nations taken after January arrive too late for us 
to include them in the decision-making process. 

A candidate can apply to take the SAT I and SAT 
II tests by visiting the College Board Web site at 
www.collegeboard.com. Special-needs students 
should write to the College Board for information 
about special testing arrangements. Applications 
and fees should reach the proper office at least 
one month before the date on which the tests are 
to be taken. It is the student's responsibility, in 
consultation with her school, to decide which tests 
and test dates are appropriate in the light of her 
program. It is also her responsibility to ask the 
College Entrance Examination Board to send to 
Smith College the results of all tests taken. The 
College Board code number for Smith College is 
3762. 

Students applying to take the ACT should visit 
the American College Testing Program Web site at 
www.act.org. 

Applying for Admission 

A student interested in Smith has three options for 
applying — Fall Early Decision, Winter Early Deci- 
sion and Regular Decision. 

Early Decision 

Fall and Winter Early Decision Plans are designed 
for students with strong qualifications who have 
selected Smith as their first choice. The plans dif- 
fer from each other only in application deadline, 
recognizing that students may decide on their col- 
lege preference at different times. In making an 
application to her first-choice college, a candidate 
eliminates much of the anxiety, effort and cost of 
preparing several college applications. Candidates 
under this plan may initiate applications to other 
colleges, but may make an Early Decision applica- 
tion to one college only. It is important to note that 



if accepted under Early Decision, a candidate must 
withdraw all other college applications and may 
not make any further applications. 

A student applying for Early Decision should 
take her SAT I and, if possible, three SAT II tests 
before her senior year. The ACT may be substituted 
for the SAT I. Supporting materials must include 
mid-semester senior grades. 

Applicants deferred in either Early Decision 
plan will be reconsidered in the spring, together 
with applicants in the Regular Decision Plan. Of- 
fers of admission are made with the understanding 
that the high school record continues to be of high 
quality through the senior year. Candidates are 
notified of financial aid decisions at the same time 
as the admission decision. 

Regular Decision 

The Regular Decision Plan is designed for students 
who wish to keep open several college options 
during the application process. Candidates may 
submit applications anytime before the January 15 
deadline. 

A student interested in Smith should request an 
application from the Office of Admission. Included 
with the application are all the forms she will 
need, including a Smith financial aid application, 
and instructions for completing each part of the 
application. She may use the Common Application 
form obtainable at her school. 

We realize that applying to college involves a 
lot of time-consuming paperwork for the appli- 
cant. It is work that we review carefully and thor- 
oughly, and we suggest that applicants do not leave 
it to the last moment. 

Advanced Placement 

Smith College participates in the Advanced Place- 
ment Program administered by the College En- 
trance Examination Board. Please refer to the Aca- 
demic Rules and Procedures section (p. 50) for ' 
information governing eligibility for and use of 
Advanced Placement credit. 



Admission 








43 


First-Year Students' Admission Deadline Dates 




Fall Early 
Decision 


Winter Early 
Decision 


Regular 
Decision 




Submit preliminary 
application and fee by: 


November 15 


January 1 


January 15 




Submit all other parts of 
the application by: 


November 15 


January 1 


February 1 




Come for an interview by: 


November 15 


January 1 


February 1 




Testing completed by: 


October 


November 


January 




File the financial aid 
application with the Smith 
Office of Financial Aid by: 


November 15 


January 1 


February 1 




Ask your counselor to send 
senior grades by: 


November 15 

(first-term 

grades) 


January 1 
(first-term 
grades) 


February 1 

(midyear 

grades) 




We notify each candidate by: 


December 15 early February April 1 
(Deferred applicants for Fall or Winter Early 
Decision are automatically reconsidered with 
Regular Decision applicants in the spring.) 




Submit the nonrefundable 

enrollment deposit to 

hold a space in the class by: 


January 15 


late February 


Mayl 




Return completed Health 
Services preadmission form by: 


June 15 


June 15 


June 15 



International Baccalaureate 

The amount of credit will be determined as soon 
as an official copy of results has been sent to the 
registrar's office. Guidelines for use are compa- 
rable to those for Advanced Placement. 

Interview 

We recommend an interview for all candidates. 
For those who live or attend school within 200 
miles of the college an on-campus interview is 
; encouraged. Others should write requesting 
information about an alumnae or alumna inter- 
I view in their area. The interview allows each can- 
i didate to become better acquainted with Smith 
and to exchange information with a member of the 



staff of the Office of Admission or a trained alumna 
volunteer. See the chart of admission deadline 
dates for times of interviews, and remember that 
we cannot interview after February 1, as we are 
busy reading applications. Interviews for juniors 
and information sessions for students and their 
families begin in mid-March. (Interviews for 
transfer candidates are offered year-round.) 

Deferred Entrance 

An admitted first-year or transfer applicant who 
has accepted Smith's offer and paid the required 
deposit may defer her entrance for one year to 
work, travel or pursue a special interest if she 
makes tins request in writing to the director of 
admission by June 1. 



44 



Admission 



Deferred Entrance for 
Medical Reasons 

An admitted first-year or transfer applicant who 
has accepted Smith's offer and paid the required 
deposit may request to postpone her entrance due 
to medical reasons if she makes this request in 
writing, explaining the nature of the medical prob- 
lem, to the director of admission by August 30. At 
that time, the college will outline expectations for 
progress over the course of the year. A Board of 
Admission subcommittee will meet the following 
March to review the student's case. Readmission is 
not guaranteed. 

Transfer Admission 

A student may apply for transfer to Smith College in 
January or September after the completion of one 
or more semesters at another institution. When she 
requests the application form she should send a 
detailed statement of her academic background 
and of her reasons for wishing to transfer. 

For January entrance, she must submit her 
application and send all credentials by November 
15. Decisions will be mailed by mid-December. 
The suggested filing date for September entrance 
is February 1, especially for students applying for 
financial aid. Candidates whose applications are 
complete by March 1 will receive admission deci- 
sions by the first week in April. Students whose 
applications are complete by May 1 will receive 
decisions by mid-May. Candidates whose applica- 
tions are complete by June 1 will receive decisions 
by mid-June. Letters from the financial aid office 
are mailed at the same time as admission letters. 

We expect a transfer student to have a strong 
academic record and to be in good standing at the 
institution she is attending. We look particularly 
for evidence of achievement in college, although 
we also consider her secondary school record. 
Her program should correlate with the general 
Smith College requirements given on pages 41-42 
of this catalogue. 

We require a candidate for the degree of bach- 
elor of arts to spend at least two years in residence 
at Smith College in Northampton, during which 
time she normally completes 64 credits. A student 



may not transfer to the junior class and spend any 
part of the junior or senior year studying in off- 
campus programs. 

International Students 

We welcome applications from qualified interna- 
tional students and advise applicants to communi- 
cate with the director of admission at least one 
year in advance of their proposed entrance. The 
initial letter should include information about the 
student's complete academic background. If fi- 
nancial aid is needed, this fact should be made 
clear in the initial correspondence. 

Visiting Year Programs 

Smith College welcomes a number of guest stu- 
dents for one year of study. In the Visiting Student 
Program, students enrolled in accredited, four- 
year liberal arts colleges or universities in the 
United States may apply to spend their sophomore, 
junior or senior year at Smith. 

International students may apply to spend a 
year at Smith under the International Visiting Pro- 
gram. (Exceptions may be made if a student 
wishes to visit for only one semester.) Applicants 
must be in their final year of studies leading to 
university entrance in their own country or cur- 
rently enrolled in a university program abroad. If 
accepted, candidates will be expected to present 
examination results — Baccalaureate, Abitur or 
GCSE, for example — before enrolling. Evidence 
of English fluency will be required of applicants 
whose first language is not English. 

Applicants to the visiting programs must fur- 
nish a transcript of their college work (or second- 
ary school work, where applicable) to date, faculty 
recommendations and a completed application. 
Applications must be completed by July 1 for Sep- 
tember entrance and by December 15 for January 
entrance. We regret that financial aid is not avail- 
able for these programs. 

Information and application material may be 
obtained by writing to Visiting Year Programs, 
Office of Admission, Smith College, Northampton, 
Massachusetts 01063. 



Admission 



45 



Readmission 

See Withdrawal and Readmission, page 54. 

Ada Comstock Scholars 
Program 

The admission process for Ada Comstock Scholars 
places particular emphasis on an autobiographical 
essay and an exchange of information in an inter- 
view. A candidate should schedule her interview 
appointment before submitting Part A of her appli- 
cation prior to the deadline, February 1 . It is the 
applicant's responsibility, before scheduling her 
interview appointment, to contact previous educa- 
tional institutions to request that all relevant tran- 
scripts be sent directly to the Ada Comstock 
Scholars Program Office. 

Ada Comstock Scholars are expected to have 
completed at least one year of transferable liberal 
arts credit before matriculation at Smith. Those 
students who offer little or no college-level work 
normally are advised to enroll elsewhere to fulfill 
this requirement before initiating the application 
process. 

Candidates are advised to file their applications 
and credentials as early as possible. For a candi- 
date to be considered for September entrance, 



Part A of the application must be in the Ada 
Comstock Scholars Program Office by February 1, 
and Part B with all supporting material by Febru- 
ary 10. 

A candidate's status as an Ada Comstock 
Scholar must be designated at the time of applica- 
tion. Normally, an applicant admitted as a student 
of traditional age will not be permitted to change 
her class status to Ada Comstock Scholar until five 
years after she withdraws as a student of tradi- 
tional age. A woman who meets the transfer credit 
guideline must apply as an Ada Comstock Scholar 
if she also meets the federal government's guide- 
lines denning independent students: 

• at least 24 years old 

• a veteran 

• responsible for dependent (s) other than a 
spouse 

A brief description of the program can be 
found on page 11. Information about expenses 
and procedures for applying for financial aid can 
be found in the section entitled Fees, Expenses and 
Financial Aid. Inquiries in writing, by phone or by 
e-mail may be addressed to the Ada Comstock 
Scholars Program Office. 



46 



Academic Rules and Procedures 



Requirements for the Degree 

The requirements for the degree from Smith Col- 
lege are completion of 128 credits of academic 
work and satisfactory completion of a major. For 
graduation the minimum standard of performance 
is a cumulative average of 2.0 in all academic work 
and a minimum average of 2.0 in the senior year. 
For those entering as first-year students, satisfactory 
completion of a writing intensive course in the first 
year is required. 

Students earning a bachelor of arts degree must 
complete at least 64 credits outside the department 
or program of the major. The requirements for the 
bachelor of science degree in engineering are listed 
in the courses of study section under Engineering. 

Candidates for the degree must complete at 
least four semesters of academic work, a minimum 
of 64 credits, in academic residence at Smith Col- 
lege in Northampton; two of these semesters must 
be completed during the junior or senior year. (For 
accelerated programs, see p. 1 1.) A student on a 
Smith Junior Year Abroad Program, the Jean Picker 
Semester-in-Washington Program or the Internship 
Program at the Smithsonian Institution is not in 
academic residence in Northampton. 

Each student is responsible for knowing all 
regulations governing the curriculum and course 
registration and is responsible for planning a 
course of study in accordance with those regula- 
tions and the requirements for the degree. 

Course Program 

The normal course program for traditional-aged 
undergraduates consists of 16 credits taken in each 
of eight semesters at Smith. Only with the approval 
of the administrative board may a student complete 
her degree requirements in fewer or more than 
eight semesters. The minimum course program for 
a traditional-aged undergraduate in any semester is 
12 credits. A traditional-aged student who is en- 
rolled in fewer than 12 credits in any semester is 
required to withdraw at the end of that semester. 
The student must remain away from the college for 



at least one semester and then may apply for read- 
mission for the following semester. 

Approved summer-school or interterm credit 
may be used to supplement a minimum 12 -credit 
program or to make up a shortage of credits. Smith 
students may accrue a maximum of 12 summer- 
school credits and 12 interterm credits at Smith or 
elsewhere toward their Smith degree. An overall 
maximum of 32 credits of combined summer, in- 
terterm, AP and pre-matriculation credits may be 
applied toward the degree. See Academic Credit, 
pages 49-51. 

A student enters her senior year after complet- 
ing a maximum of six semesters and attaining at 
least 96 Smith College or approved transfer credits. 
Normally, a student may not enter the senior year 
with a shortage of credits. A student in residence 
may carry no more than 24 credits per semester 
unless approved by the Administrative Board. 

Admission to Courses 

Instructors are not required to hold spaces for 
students who do not attend the first class meeting 
and may refuse admittance to students seeking to 
add courses who have not attended the first class 
meetings. 

PERMISSIONS 

Some courses require written permission of the 
instructor and/or chair of the department con- 
cerned before the course is elected. 

A student who does not have the prerequisites 
for a course may elect it only with the permission 
of the instructor and the chair of the department in 
which the course is offered. 

A student must petition the administrative boan 
for permission to enter or drop a year-long course' 
with credit at midyear. The petition must be signed 
by the instructor of the course, the student's advise 
and the chair of the department concerned before 
it is submitted to the class dean. 

SEMINARS 

Seminars are limited to 12 students and are open, 
by permission of the instructor, to juniors, seniors 



cademic Rules and Procedures 



47 



and graduate students only. At the discretion of the 
•instructor and with the approval of the department 
chair or the program director, 15 students may 
enroll. If enrollment exceeds this number, the 
instructor will select the best-qualified candidates. 

SPECIAL STUDIES 

Permission of the instructor, the department chair 
and in some cases the department is required for 
the election of Special Studies. Special Studies are 
open only to qualified juniors and seniors. A maxi- 
mum of 16 credits of special studies may be 
counted toward the degree. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Independent study for credit may be proposed by 
qualified juniors and seniors. Approval of the ap- 
propriate department (s) and the Committee on 
Academic Priorities is required. Time spent on 
independent study off campus cannot be used to 
fulfill the residence requirement. The deadline for 
submission of proposals is November 30 for a 
second-semester program and April 30 for a first- 
semester program. 

INTERNSHIPS 

An internship for credit, supervised by a Smith 
faculty member, may be proposed by qualified 
sophomores, juniors and seniors. Approval of the 
appropriate department (s) and the Committee on 
Academic Priorities is required. The deadline for 
submission of proposals is November 30 for a 
second-semester program and April 30 for a first- 
semester program. 

AUDITING 

A degree student at Smith or at the Five Colleges 
may audit a course on a regular basis if space is 
available and the permission of the instructor is 
obtained. An audit is not recorded on the tran- 
script. 

AUDITING BY NONMATRICULATED STUDENTS 

A nonmatriculated student who has earned a high 
school diploma and who wishes to audit a course 
may do so with the permission of the instructor 
and the registrar. An auditor must submit a com- 
pleted registration form to the registrar's office by 
the end of the second week of classes. A fee will 
be charged and is determined by the type of 
course. Studio classes may not be audited except 



by permission of the art faculty following a written 
request to the department. Records of audits are 
not maintained. 

Changes in Course Registration 

ADDING AND DROPPING COURSES 

During the first 10 class days, a student may enter 
or drop a course with the approval of the adviser 
and after consultation with the instructor. From 
the 1 1th through the 15th day of class, a student 
may enter a course with the permission of the 
instructor, the adviser and the class dean. 

After the 10th day of classes a student may 
drop a course up to the end of the fifth week of the 
semester: 

1 . after discussion with the instructor; 

2. with the approval of the adviser and the class 
dean; and 

3. if, after dropping the course, she is enrolled in 
at least 12 credits for regular letter grades. 
(This provision does not apply to Ada 
Comstock Scholars.) 

After the end of the fifth week of the semester a 
student may not drop a course. However, on two 
and only two occasions during her years at the 
college — once during her first year; once during 
any subsequent year — a student may drop a 
course at any time up to the end of the ninth week 
of classes, for any reason, without penalty. The 
drop form requires the signatures of the instruc- 
tor, adviser and class dean. 

A student who wishes to drop a seminar or 
course with limited enrollment should do so at the 
earliest possible time so that another student may 
take advantage of the opening. Because the orga- 
nization and operation of such courses are often 
critically dependent on the students enrolled, the 
instructor may refuse permission to drop the 
course after the first 10 class days. 

A student registers for an Interterm course in 
November, with the approval of her adviser. In 
January, a student may drop or enter an Interterm 
course within the first three days with a class 
dean's signature. Otherwise, the student who 
registers but does not attend will receive a "U" 
(unsatisfactory) for the course. 

Regulations governing changes in enrollment 
for courses in one of the other four colleges may 
be more restrictive than the above. Instructions 



48 



Academic Rules and Procedures 



and deadlines for registration in Five College 
courses are published by the registrar's office 
and included in the registration packet. 

Fine for Late Registration 

A student who has not registered for courses by 
the end of the first 10 days of classes will be fined 
$25, payable at the time of registration. In addi- 
tion, a fine of $25 will be assessed for each ap- 
proved petition to add or drop a course after the 
deadline. If a student has not completed registra- 
tion by the end of the first six weeks of the semes- 
ter, she will be administratively withdrawn. 

Class Attendance and Assignments 

Students are expected to attend all their scheduled 
classes. Any student who is unable, because of her 
religious beliefs, to attend classes or to participate 
in any examination, study or work requirement on 
a particular day shall be excused from such activi- 
ties without prejudice and shall be given an oppor- 
tunity to make them up. 

Students are expected to spend at least two 
hours per week in preparation for every class 
hour. 

Students are asked to introduce guests to the 
instructor of a class before the beginning of the 
class if there is an opportunity and at the end if 
there is not. 

Absence does not relieve the student from 
responsibility for work required while she was 
absent. The instructor may require her to give 
evidence that she has done the work assigned. 
In courses in which the written examinations can 
test only a part of the work, the instructor may 
rule that a student who does not attend class with 
reasonable regularity has not presented evidence 
that she has done the work. 

The due date for final papers in each semester 
can be no later than the end of the examination 
period. Instructors must specify the exact deadline 
and place of delivery for final papers. If a paper or 
other course work is mailed to an instructor, it 
must be sent by certified mail, return receipt re- 
quested, and the student must keep a paper copy. 



Deadlines and Extensions 

Only the class dean may authorize an extension for 
any reason beyond the end of the final examina- 
tion period. Such extensions, granted for reasons 
of illness, emergency or extenuating personal cir- 
cumstances, will always be confirmed in writing 
with the faculty member, the registrar and the stu- 
dent. An individual faculty member, without autho- 
rization by the class dean, may grant extensions on 
work due during the semester through the last day 
of final exams. 

Pre-examination Period 

The pre-examination study period, between the 
end of classes and the beginning of final examina- 
tions, is set aside for students to prepare for ex- 
aminations. Therefore, the college does not sched- 
ule social, academic or cultural activities during 
this time. Deadlines for papers, take-home exams 
or other course work cannot be during the pre- 
examination study period. 

Final Examinations 

Most final exams at Smith are self-scheduled and 
administered by the registrar during predeter- 
mined periods. A student may elect in which pe- 
riod she wants to take each exam. Exams are 
picked up at distribution centers after showing a 
picture ID and must be returned to the same cen- 
ter no more than two hours and 20 minutes from 
the time they are received by the student. Extra 
time taken to write an exam is considered a viola- 
tion of the Academic Honor Code and will be re- 
ported to the Academic Honor Board. A student 
who is late for an exam may write for the remain- 
ing time in the examination period but may not 
have additional time. Exams which involve slides, 
dictation or listening comprehension are sched- 
uled by the registrar. Such examinations may be 
taken only at the scheduled time. 

For information regarding illness during the 
examination period, call Health Services at exten- , 
sion 2800 for instructions. 

Further details of the Academic Honor Code as 
they apply to examinations and class work are 
given in the Smith College Handbook andAca- 
demic Planner. Regulations of the faculty and the 



\cademic Rules and Procedures 



49 



registrar regarding final examination procedures 
are announced in AcaMedia prior to the final ex- 
amination period. 

No scheduled or self-scheduled examination 
nay be taken outside the regular examination 
Deriod without prior permission of the administra- 
te board. Written requests must be made to the 
idministrative board through the class dean (not 
:o individual faculty members). Requests to take 
inal examinations early will not be considered; 
lierefore, travel plans must be made accordingly. 

Five College Course Enrollments 

application forms to elect a course at one of the 
jther four institutions may be obtained from the 
3ffice of the Registrar. Application forms should 
3e submitted during the period for advising and 
election of courses for the coming semester. Cur- 
rent catalogues of the other institutions are avail- 
able at the loan desk in Neilson Library, in the 
:lass deans' office and in the registrar's office. 
Information is also available through the Five Col- 
ege on-line catalogue. Free bus transportation to 
ind from the institution is available for Five Col- 
ege smdents. Students in good standing, with the 
exception of first-year smdents in their first semes- 
er, are eligible to take a course at one of the other 
nstitutions. A student may take no more than half 
}f her course program in any semester off cam- 
3us. A student must register for an approved 
:ourse at one of the other four institutions by the 
md of the interchange deadline. Students must 
idhere to the registration procedures and dead- 
ines of their home institution. 

Five College courses are those taught by special 
Five College faculty appointees. These courses are 
isted on pages 382-387 in this catalogue. Coop- 
erative courses are taught jointly by faculty mem- 
bers from several institutions and are usually 
Approved and listed in the catalogues of the par- 
dcipating institutions. The same application forms 
and approvals apply to Five College courses and 
cooperative courses. A fist of Five College courses 
approved for Smith College degree credit is avail- 
able at the registrar's office. Requests for approval 
of courses not on the fist may be submitted to the 
registrar's office for review; however, Smith Col- 
lege does not accept all Five College courses for 
credit toward the Smith degree. 



Students taking a course at one of the other 
institutions are, in that course, subject to the aca- 
demic regulations, including the calendar, dead- 
lines and academic honor system, of the host insti- 
tution. It is the responsibility of the student to be 
familiar with the pertinent regulations of the host 
institution, including those for attendance, aca- 
demic honesty, grading options and deadlines for 
completing coursework and taking examinations. 
Smdents follow the registration add/drop deadlines 
of their home institution. Regulations governing 
changes in enrollment in Five College courses are 
published at the beginning of each semester by the 
registrar's office. 

Academic Credit 

Grading System 

Grades are recorded by the registrar at the end 

of each semester. Grade reports are sent to each 

student at her home address, in January and June, 

and are available on-line. 

Grades at Smith indicate the following: 

A (4.0) C- (1.7) 

A- (3.7) D+ (1.3) 

B+ (3.3) D (1.0) 

B (3.0) D- (0.7) 

B- (2.7) E (0.0) 

C+ (2.3) S: satisfactory (C- or better) 

C (2.0) U: unsatisfactory 

SATISFACTORY/UNSATISFACTORY OPTION 

Coursework in any one semester may be taken for 
a satisfactory (C- or better)/unsatisfactory grade, 
providing that: 

1) the instructor approves the option; 

2) the student declares the grading option for 
Smith courses by the end of the ninth week of 
classes. The fall deadline also applies to year- 
long courses. Smdents enrolled in Five College 
courses must follow the deadlines of the host 
institution. 

Within the 128 credits required for the degree, 
a maximum of 16 credits (Smith or other Five Col- 
lege) may be taken for the satisfactory/unsatisfac- 
tory grading option, regardless of how many 
graded credits smdents are enrolled in per semes- 
ter. Some departments will not approve the 



50 



Academic Rules and Procedures 



satisfactory/unsatisfactory grading option for 
courses counting toward the major. 

Satisfactory/unsatisfactory grades do not count 
in the grade point average. 

An Ada Comstock Scholar or a transfer student 
may elect the satisfactory/unsatisfactory grading 
option for four credits out of every 32 that she 
takes at Smith College. 

Performance Credits 

Students are allowed to count a limited number of 
performance credits toward the Smith degree. The 
maximum number allowed is indicated in the 
Courses of Study section under the appropriate 
departments. Excess performance credits are in- 
cluded on the transcript but do not count toward 
the degree. 

Shortage of Credits 

A shortage of credits incurred by failing or drop- 
ping a course may be made up by an equivalent 
amount of work carried above the normal 16- 
credit program, or with approved summer-school 
or Interterm courses accepted for credit toward 
the Smith College degree. In the case of failure in a 
course or dropping a course for reasons of health, 
a shortage may be filled with a student's available 
Advanced Placement or other pre-matriculation 
credits. Any student with more than a two-credit 
shortage may be required to complete the short- 
age before returning for classes in September. 

A student may not enter her senior year with 
fewer than % credits of Smith College or approved 
transfer credit. A student may not participate in a 
Smith-sponsored or affiliated Junior Year Abroad 
or exchange program with a shortage of credit. 

Transfer Credit 

A student who attends another accredited college 
or university and requests credit toward a Smith 
College degree for the work done there: 

a) should make her plans in accordance with the 
regulations concerning off-campus study and, 
in the case of seniors, in accordance with the 
regulations concerning academic residence; 

b) should obtain, from the class dean's office, the 
guidelines for transferring credit. Official tran- 



scripts should be sent directly to the registrar 
from the other institution; 
c) must, if approved to study abroad, have her 
program approved in advance by the Commit- 
tee on Study Abroad. 
Final evaluation of credit is made after receipt of 
the official transcript showing satisfactory comple- 
tion of the program. 

A student may not receive credit for work com- 
pleted at another institution while in residence at 
Smith College, except for Interterm courses and 
courses taken on the Five College interchange. 

Advanced Placement 

Smith College participates in the Advanced Place- 
ment Program administered by the College En- 
trance Examination Board. Advanced Placement 
credit may be used with the approval of the Ad- 
ministrative Board only (1) to make up a shortage 
of credits incurred through failure; (2) to make 
up a shortage of credit incurred as a result of 
dropping a course for reasons of health; or (3) 
to undertake an accelerated course program. 

Credits are recorded for scores of 4 or 5 on 
most Advanced Placement examinations. The 
credits to be recorded for each examination are 
determined by the individual department. A maxi- 
mum of one year (32 credits) of Advanced Place- 
ment credit may be counted toward the degree. 
Students entering with 24 or more Advanced 
Placement credits may apply for advanced stand- 
ing after completion of the first semester's work. 

Students who complete courses that cover sub- 
stantially the same material as those for which 
Advanced Placement credit is recorded may not 
then apply that Advanced Placement credit toward 
the degree requirements. The individual depart- 
ments will determine what courses cover the same 
material. 

The individual departments will determine 
placement in or exemption from Smith courses 
and the use of Advanced Placement credit to fulfill 
major requirements. No more than eight credits 
will be granted toward the major in any one de- 
partment. 

Advanced Placement credit may be used to 
count toward the 64 credits outside the major de- 
partment or program but may not be used to fulfil 
the distribution requirements for Latin Honors. 



Academic Rules and Procedures 



SI 



International Baccalaureate and 
Other Diploma Programs 

Credit may be awarded for the International Bac- 
calaureate and 13th year programs outside the 
United States. The amount of credit is determined 
by the registrar upon review of the final results. 
Such credits may be used toward the Smith degree 
in the same manner as AP credits and may not be 
used to fulfill the distribution requirements for 
Latin Honors. 

College Credit Earned Before 
Matriculation 

Smith College will accept college credit with a 
grade of B- or better earned at an accredited col- 
lege or university before matriculation as a first- 
year student. Such credit must be approved ac- 
cording to Smith College guidelines for transfer 
credit and submitted on an official college or uni- 
versity transcript. Such credits must be taken on 
the college or university campus with matriculated 
degree students and must be taught by a college or 
university professor. The course may not be listed 
Dn the high school transcript as counting toward 
high school graduation. Note that the restriction of 
32 credits holds for any combination of AP and/or 
college credit earned before matriculation. Credits 
earned before matriculation may be used in the 
same manner as .AP credits toward the Smith de- 
cree and may not be used to fulfill the distribution 
requirements for Latin Honors. Summer credits 
earned before matriculation will be counted in the 
12 -credit limit of summer credit applicable to the 
Smith degree. 

Summer-School Credit 

Students may accrue a maximum of 12 approved 
summer-school credits toward their Smith degree 
with an overall maximum of 32 credits of corn- 
Dined summer, interterm, AP and pre-matricula- 
ion credits. With the prior approval of the class 
dean, the credit may be used to allow students to 
•nake up a shortage of credits or to undertake an 
accelerated course program. For transfer stu- 
dents, summer school credits completed prior to 
enrollment at Smith College are included in the 
,12-credit maximum. 



Interterm Credit 

The college may offer courses for credit during the 
interterm period. Such courses will earn' one to 
four credits and will count toward the degree. The 
college will consider for credit academic inter- 
term courses taken at other institutions. The num- 
ber of credits accepted for each interterm course 
(normally up to 3) will be determined by the reg- 
istrar upon review of the credits assigned by the 
host institution. Any interterm course designated 
4 credits by a host institution must be reviewed by 
the class deans and the registrar to determine 
whether it merits an exception to the 3-credit 
limit. Students may accrue a maximum of 12 ap- 
proved Interterm credits at Smith or elsewhere 
toward their Smith degree with an overall maxi- 
mum of 32 credits of combined summer, Inter- 
term, AP and pre-matriculation credits. Students 
may not take more than 4 credits during any one 
interterm at Smith or elsewhere. For transfer stu- 
dents, interterm credits completed prior to enroll- 
ment at Smith College are included in the 12- 
credit maximum. 

The interterm may also be a period of reading, 
research or concentrated study for both students 
and faculty. Faculty, students or staff may offer 
non-credit instruction or experimental projects in 
this period. Special conferences may be scheduled 
and field trips may be arranged at the discretion of 
individual members of the faculty. Libraries, the 
Center for Foreign Languages and Cultures, prac- 
tice rooms and physical education facilities will 
remain open at the discretion of the departments 
concerned. This period also provides time for 
work in libraries, museums and laboratories at 
locations other than Smith College. 

Repeating Courses 

Normally courses may not be repeated for credit. 
In a few courses, the content of which varies from 
year to year, exceptions to this rule may be made 
by the instructor and the chair of the department. 
A student who has failed a course may repeat it 
with the original grade remaining on the record. 
The second grade is also recorded. A student who 
wants to repeat a course she has not failed may do 
so for no credit. The second grade is recorded but 
does not count in the grade point average. 



52 



Academic Rules and Procedures 



Academic Standing 

A student is in good academic standing as long as 
she is matriculated at Smith and is considered by 
the administrative board to be making satisfactory 
progress toward the degree. The academic stand- 
ing of all students is reviewed at the end of each 
semester. 

Academic Probation 

A student whose academic record is below 2.0, 
either cumulatively or in a given semester, will be 
placed on academic probation for the subsequent 
semester. Probationary status is a warning. Notifi- 
cation of probationary status is made in writing to 
the student, her family and her academic adviser. 
Instructors of a student on probation may be 
asked to make academic reports to the class 
deans' offices during the period of probation. The 
administrative board will review a student's record 
at the end of the following semester to determine 
what action is appropriate. The administrative 
board may require such a student to change her 
course program, to complete summer study or to 
withdraw from the college. 

In general, a student on probation is advised to 
take no more than 16 credits. She may not enroll 
in courses through the Five College interchange, 
and may not run for or hold elected or selected 
office, either campuswide or within her house. 
Students whose grade point average is below 2.0 
may not compete in intercollegiate athletics or 
club sports. 

Standards for Satisfactory Progress 

A student is not making satisfactory progress to- 
ward the degree if she remains on academic pro- 
bation for more than two consecutive semesters. 
In addition: (1) For students of traditional age, 
the record cannot have more than an eight-credit 
shortage for more than two consecutive semesters. 
(2) For Ada Comstock Scholars receiving financial 
aid, at least 75 percent of all credits attempted in 
any academic year must be completed in order to 
continue receiving aid. Students not meeting this 
criterion are put on financial aid probation and 
may become ineligible for aid if the probationary 
period exceeds one year. Further information is 
available in the Office of Student Financial Services. 



Absence from Classes 

A student who is absent from classes for more than 
six weeks in any semester may not receive credit 
for the work of that semester and will be adminis- 
tratively withdrawn from the college. 

Separation from the College 

A student whose college work or conduct is 
deemed unsatisfactory is subject to separation 
from the college by action of the administrative 
board, the honor board, the college judicial board 
or the dean of the college. There will be no refund 
for tuition or room fees. 



Administrative Board 






The administrative board administers the academic 
requirements defined by faculty legislation. In gen- 
eral, academic matters affecting students are re- 
ferred to this board for action or recommendation. 
The board consists of the dean of the college 
(chair), the class deans, the registrar, the director 
of the Ada Comstock Scholars Program and three 
faculty members appointed by the president. 

Petitions for exceptions to academic regula- 
tions are submitted in writing to the administrative 
board through the class dean, with appropriate 
faculty approvals. The administrative board will 
reconsider a decision only if new information is 
presented. 

The board has the authority to take action with 
respect to the academic performance of individual 
students, including the requirement that a student 
must leave the college. 

Student Academic Grievances 

The Smith College community has always been 
dedicated to the advancement of learning and the 
pursuit of truth under conditions of freedom, trust 
mutual respect and individual integrity. The learn- 
ing experience at Smith is rooted in the free ex- 
change of ideas and concerns between faculty 
members and students. Students have the right to 
expect fair treatment and to be protected against 
any inappropriate exercise of faculty authority. 
Similarly, instructors have the right to expect that 
their rights and judgments will be respected by 
students and other faculty members. 



Vcademic Rules and Procedures 



53 



When differences of opinion or misunder- 
standing about what constitutes fairness in re- 
quirements or procedures leads to conflict, it is 
aoped that these differences will be resolved di- 
rectly by the individuals involved. When disputes 
:annot be resolved informally by the parties in- 
/olved, procedures have been established to 
ichieve formal resolution. These procedures are 
3xplained in detail in the Smith College Hand- 
book and Academic Planner. 

The Age of Majority 

Jnder Massachusetts law, the age of majority is 18 
ind carries full adult rights and responsibilities, 
rhe college normally communicates directly with 
students in matters concerning grades, academic 
:redit and standing. 

However, the regulations of the federal Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 make 
:lear that information from the educational 
'ecords of students who are dependents of their 
)arents for Internal Revenue Service purposes, 
nay be disclosed to the parents without the 
student's prior consent. It is the policy of the col- 
ege to notify both the student and her parents in 
vriting of probationary status, dismissal and cer- 
ain academic warnings. Any student who is not a 
lependent of her parents, as defined by the Inter- 
lal Revenue Code, must notify the registrar of the 
:ollege in writing, with supporting evidence satis- 
actory to the college, by October 1 of each aca- 
lemic year. 

In communications with parents concerning 
)ther matters, it is normally college policy to re- 
spect the privacy of the student and not to disclose 
nformation from student educational records 
without the prior consent of the student. At the 
•equest of the student, such information will be 
provided to parents and guardians. 



Leaves, Withdrawal and 
Readmission 

Off-Campus Study or Personal Leaves 

A student who wishes to be away from the college 
for a semester or academic year must submit a 
request for approved off-campus study or personal 
leave. The request must be filed with the student's 
class dean by May 1 for a fall semester or aca- 
demic year absence; by December 1 for a second 
semester absence. No requests will be approved 
after May 1 for the following fall semester or aca- 
demic year and December 1 for the spring semes- 
ter; the student must withdraw from the college. 

A student going on a Smith College Junior Year 
Abroad program or other approved study abroad 
program must file a request for approved off-cam- 
pus study by the appropriate deadline. 

A student who wishes to complete part or all 
of her senior year away from campus on a Smith 
or non-Smith program or at another undergradu- 
ate institution must petition the administrative 
board. The petition must include a plan for the 
satisfactory completion of the major and degree 
requirements, and must have the approval of the 
department of the major. The petition must be 
filed in the Office of the Class Deans by the dead- 
line to request approval of off-campus study. 

A student who expects to attend another col- 
lege and request transfer credit on her return 
must abide by published guidelines (available in 
the class dean's office) for transferring credit. A 
student may request provisional approval of trans- 
fer credit through the class deans' office. For final 
evaluation of credit, an official transcript must be 
sent direcdy from the other institution to the regis- 
trar at Smith College. 

A student who wants to be away from the col- 
lege for more than one year must withdraw. 

A student on approved off-campus study or 
personal leave is expected to adhere to the poli- 
cies regarding such absences (available in the 
class dean's office and the Ada Comstock Scholars 
office) . A student's account must be in good stand- 
ing or the request will not be approved. 



54 



Academic Rules and Procedures 



Medical Leave 

If a student leaves the college on the advice of the 
health services, confirmation will be sent to her 
and her family by the registrar. A student is consid- 
ered withdrawn and must apply for readmission 
through the registrar. A full report from her health 
care provider must be sent to the director of 
health services (or the associate director when 
specified). The student's health will be evaluated 
and a personal interview and documentation of 
improved functioning may be required before an 
application for readmission is considered by the 
adnunistrative board. Clearance by the health ser- 
vices does not automatically guarantee readmis- 
sion. The administrative board, which makes the 
final decision on readmission, will also take into 
consideration the student's college record. 

Short-Term Medical Leave 

A student who is away from campus for an ex- 
tended period of time (i.e., a week or more) for 
medical reasons may be placed on a short-term 
medical leave by Health Services. Instructors will 
be notified of the student's status by the class 
deans' office. 

Any student who is placed on short-term medi- 
cal leave, whether by Health Services or through 
her class dean, must receive clearance from 
Health Services before returning to campus. 
Health Services may require documentation from 
her health care provider before the student can 
return. The student must notify her class dean of 
her intention to return to classes. 



Mandatory Medical Leave 

The college physician or the director of the coun 
seling service may require the withdrawal of a 
student who has any illness or condition that might 
endanger or be damaging to the health or welfare 
of herself or any member of the college commu- 
nity, or whose illness or condition is such that it 
cannot be effectively treated or managed while the 
student is a member of the college community. 

Withdrawal and Readmission 

A student who plans to withdraw from the college 
should notify her class dean. When notice of with- 
drawal for the coming semester is given before 
June 30 or December 1, the student's general de- 
posit ($100) is refunded. Official confirmation of 
the withdrawal will be sent to the student by the 
registrar. 

A withdrawn student must apply to the registrar 
for readmission. Application for readmission in 
September must be sent to the registrar before 
March 1; for readmission in January, before No- 
vember 1. The administrative board acts upon all 
requests for readmission and may require that 
applicants meet with the class dean or director 
of Health Services before considering the request. 
Normally, students who have withdrawn from the 
college must be away for at least one full semester. 

Any student who has been away from Smith 
College for five or more years should make an 
appointment to speak with the director of the Ada 
Comstock Scholars Program before applying for 
readmission. 









55 



Graduate Study 




mith College offers graduate work lead- 
ing to the degrees of master of arts, mas- 
ter of arts in teaching, master of fine arts, 
master of education, master of education 
of the deaf, master of science in exercise 
and sport studies and master and Ph.D. in social 
ivork. As well, the college has a limited program 
eading to the degree of doctor of philosophy. In 
;pecial one-year programs, international students 
nay qualify 7 for a certificate of graduate studies or 
i diploma in American studies. 

Each year more than 100 men and women pur- 
sue such advanced work. Individuals may also 
enroll as nondegree students by registering for one 
)r more courses. Smith College is noted for its 
>uperb facilities, bucolic setting and distinguished 
acuity who are recognized for their scholarship 
ind interest in teaching. Moreover, graduate stu- 
dents can expect to participate in small classes and 
"eceive personalized attention from instructors. 

Most graduate courses, which are designated 
is 500-level courses in the course listings, are 
3lanned for graduate students who are degree 
:andidates. The departments offering this work 
. )resent a limited number of graduate seminars, 
idvanced experimental work or special studies 
designed for graduate students. Graduate students 
, nay take advanced undergraduate courses, sub- 
ect to the limitations stated in the paragraphs 
describing the requirements for the graduate de- 
crees. Departmental graduate advisers help gradu- 
ue students individually to devise appropriate 
jrograms of study. 

A cooperative Ph.D. program is offered by 
Vmherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke and Smith 
iclleges and the University of Massachusetts in 
he fields of astronomy, biological sciences, chem- 
stry, geology; history and physics. The degree is 
iwarded by the university in cooperation with 
he institution in which the student has done the 



research for the dissertation. Students interested 
in this program should write to the dean of the 
graduate school, University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst, Massachusetts 01003. 



Admission 



To enter a graduate degree program, a student 
must have a bachelor's degree or its equivalent, 
an undergraduate record of high caliber and ac- 
ceptance by the department concerned. All do- 
mestic applicants who wish to be considered for 
financial aid must submit all required application 
materials before January 15 of the proposed year 
of entry into the program, and financial aid forms 
before February 15 (refer to Financial Aid, page 
61). All international applications for a master's 
degree or for the Diploma in American Studies 
Program must be received on or before January 
15 of the proposed year of entry into the program. 
The deadline for admission without financial aid 
to most graduate programs is April 15 of the pro- 
posed year of entry for the first semester, and De- 
cember 1 for the second semester. Exceptions to 
this deadline are as follows: Master of Arts in Ital- 
ian, January 15; Master of Fine Arts in Dance, 
January 15. 

Applicants must submit the following: the for- 
mal application, an official transcript of the under- 
graduate record, letters of recommendation from 
instructors at the undergraduate institution and 
scores from the Graduate Record Examination. 
The Miller Analogies Test is an acceptable alterna- 
tive for the Master of Education (Ed.M.) and the 
Master of Education of the Deaf (M.E.D.) only. 
Applicants from non-English-speaking countries 
must submit official results of the Test of English 
as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) . Applicants from 
English-speaking countries must submit the 



OFFICE OF GRADUATE STUDY 

106 LILLY HALL 

SMITH COLLEGE, NORTHAMPTON, MA 01063 

TELEPHONE: (413) 585-3050 

E-MAIL: GRADSTDY@SMITH.EDU 



56 



Graduate Study 



Graduate Record Examination. Candidates must 
also submit a paper written in an advanced under- 
graduate course, except for MFA playwriting 
candidates, who must also submit one or more 
full-length scripts or their equivalent. Address 
correspondence to the Office of Graduate Study. 

Smith College is committed to maintaining a 
diverse community in an atmosphere of mutual 
respect and appreciation of differences. 

The college does not discriminate in its educa- 
tional and employment policies on the bases of 
race, color, creed, religion, national/ethnic origin, 
sex, sexual orientation, age, or with regard to the 
bases outlined in the Veterans Readjustment Act 
and the Americans with Disabilities Act. 

For more information, please contact the Of- 
fice of Institutional Diversity, (413) 585-2141. 

Residence Requirements 

Students who are registered for a graduate degree 
program at Smith College are considered to be in 
residence. A full-time graduate student takes a 
minimum course program of 12 credits per se- 
mester. A half-time student takes a minimum 
course program of eight credits per semester. 
With the approval of their academic adviser and 
the director of graduate study, they may take a 
maximum of 12 credits for degree credit at 
Amherst, Hampshire or Mount Holyoke colleges 
or the University of Massachusetts. No more than 
two courses (eight credits) will be accepted in 
transfer from outside of the Five Colleges. We 
strongly recommend that work for advanced de- 
grees be continuous; if it is interrupted or under- 
taken on a part-time basis, an extended period is 
permitted, but all work for a master's degree nor- 
mally must be completed within a period of four 
years. Exceptions to this policy will be considered 
by petition to the Administrative Board. During this 
period a continuation fee of $50 will be charged 
for each semester during which a student is not 
enrolled at Smith College in course work toward 
the degree. 

Leaves of Absence 

A student who wishes to be away from the college 
for a semester or academic year for personal 



reasons may request a leave of absence. The re- 
quest must be filed with the Office of Graduate 
Study by May 1 for a fall semester or academic yeai 
leave; by December 1 for a second-semester leave. 
No leaves of absence will be approved after May 1 
for the following fall semester or academic year 
and December 1 for the spring semester, and the 
student must withdraw from the college. 

A leave of absence may not be extended beyond 
one full academic year, and a student who wants to 
be away from the college for more than one year 
must withdraw. 

A student on a leave of absence is expected to 
adhere to the policies regarding such leaves. A 
student's tuition account must be in good standing 
or the leave of absence will be canceled. 

Degree Programs 

Master of Arts 

The master of arts degree is offered by the follow- 
ing departments: biological sciences, Italian, music 
philosophy and religion. The department of history 
occasionally accepts M.A. candidates under special 
circumstances. 

Applicants to the master of arts program are 
normally expected to have majored in the depart- 
ment concerned, although most departments will 
consider an applicant who has had some under- 
graduate work in the field and has majored in a 
related one. All such cases fall under the jurisdic- 
tion of the department. Prospective students who 
are in this category should address questions aboi 
specific details to the director of graduate study. 
With departmental approval, a student whose un- 
dergraduate preparation is deemed inadequate m 
make up any deficiency at Smith College. 

Candidates for this degree must also offer evi- 
dence, satisfactory to the department concerned, 
of a reading knowledge of at least one foreign lan- 
guage commonly used in the field of study. 

We require a minimum of 32 credits of work, 
of which at least 16, including those in preparatio 
for the thesis, must be of graduate level. The re- i 
maining 16 may be undergraduate courses (of in: 
termediate or advanced level) , but no more than 
eight credits at the intermediate (200) level are j 
permitted. With the approval of the department, r 
more than three undergraduate seminars may bet 



iraduate Study 



57 



substituted for graduate-level courses. To be 
:ounted toward the degree, all work, including the 
hesis, must receive a grade of at least B-, but the 
legree will not be awarded to a student who has 
10 grade above this minimum. Courses for gradu- 
ite credit may not be taken on a satisfactory/unsat- 
sfactory basis. The requirements described in this 
paragraph are minimal. Any department may set 
.ddiuonal or special requirements and thereby 
ncrease the total number of courses involved. 

A thesis is also required of each candidate for 
his degree. It may be limited in scope but must 
'.emonstrate scholarly competence; it is equivalent 
d a one semester, four-credit course or a two se- 
mester, eight-credit course. Two copies must be 
•resented to the committee for deposit in the li- 
■rary. The thesis may be completed in absentia 
illy by special permission of the department and 
•f the director of graduate study. 

Although the requirements for this degree may 
*e fulfilled in one academic year by well-prepared, 
all-time students, most candidates find it neces- 
sary to spend three or four semesters in residence. 

Particular features of the various departmental 
:rograms are given below. 

(IOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

he master of arts degree in biological sciences 
:mphasizes independent research along with ad- 
anced course work. Candidates for admission 
ihould demonstrate a strong background in biol- 
jgy and a dedication to pursue laboratory re- 
earch. We offer opportunities to focus in a wide 
ariety of areas of biology, including molecular 
iology, microbiology, biochemistry, genetics, evo- 
ltionary biology, animal behavior, developmental 
iology, neurobiology, ecology, marine biology, 
lant and animal physiology, and environmental 
ciences. Programs for the master's degree are 
esigned to meet individual needs and ordinarily 
lclude the equivalent of eight credits of thesis 
iesearch. An oral presentation of the thesis is re- 
uired. 

IfALIAN 

andidates should have had an undergraduate 
lajor in Italian language and literature, another 
.omance language, English literature or a subject 
slated to Italian studies, such as art, history or 
jjiusic; exceptions will be made in individual cases. 
jll candidates should have a good reading knowl- 



edge of Italian and should submit a paper in Ital- 
ian at the time of their application. Candidates 
must spend one academic year taking courses at 
the University of Florence as participants in the 
Smith College Program in Florence, Italy, and must 
complete a thesis and the equivalent of 32 credits 
at the graduate level. 

MUSIC 

The master of arts degree in music may be earned 
with a concentration in composition, music his- 
tory, ethnomusicology or popular music studies. 
Candidates should have had at least nine courses 
in music at the undergraduate level, including 
experience in theory (harmony, counterpoint, 
analysis) , a general survey of music history and 
acquaintance with some more specialized field of 
music literature. Candidates are expected to have 
a reasonable facility at the keyboard and a reading 
knowledge of at least one language other than 
English. Applicants whose training falls short of 
the above requirements may be asked, upon ac- 
ceptance, to take some remedial undergraduate 
courses (whose credit status will be determined 
by the departmental graduate adviser) . The master 
of arts program in music, usually completed in 
two academic years, requires 48 credits, normally 
distributed as follows: a minimum of 24 at the 
graduate level (eight of which will be in prepara- 
tion of the thesis) and a maximum of 24 at the 
undergraduate level (eight of which, with the ap- 
proval of the departmental graduate adviser, may 
be at the intermediate level). Eight of the 48 re- 
quired credits may be in performance, but a stu- 
dent who qualifies for graduate-level study in 
performance (auditions are held in May and Sep- 
tember) may be invited by the appropriate instruc- 
tor and the departmental graduate adviser to elect 
16 credits in performance. A composer may be 
invited by the appropriate instructor and the de- 
partmental graduate adviser to prepare a compo- 
sition in lieu of a thesis. A suitable program, inevi- 
tably including a good deal of independent study, 
will be worked out by each student and the depart- 
mental graduate adviser. 

PHILOSOPHY 

A candidate should have at least six courses in 
philosophy (including thesis credit) and three 
courses in closely related fields. A thesis is re- 
quired and an oral examination on the completed 



58 



Graduate Stud) 



thesis is expected. Candidates for the master of 
arts degree in philosophy will be admitted in order 
to focus on certain specialties covered by various 
faculty members. Because the department is not 
large, applicants should ascertain before applying 
that their area of focus can be covered during the 
year they plan to be in residence. 

RELIGION 

Admission will normally be limited to well-quali- 
fied applicants whose personal circumstances 
(family, job or the like) require them to reside 
within commuting distance of Smith College. 
A candidate must have completed undergraduate 
studies in religion and in related fields to demon- 
strate to the department that he or she has compe- 
tence and sufficient preparation for graduate work 
in religion (see, as an approximate guide, require- 
ments for the undergraduate major in religion 
elsewhere in this catalogue) . In addition to the 32 
credits required by the college for the master's 
degree, the department may require a course or 
courses to make up for deficiencies it finds in the 
general background of a candidate it accepts. Can- 
didates must demonstrate a working knowledge of 
at least one of the languages (other than English) 
used by the primary sources in their field. Credits 
taken to acquire such proficiency will be in addi- 
tion to the 32 required for the degree. An oral 
examination on the completed thesis is expected. 

Master of Arts in Teaching 

The departments of biological sciences, chemistry, 
English, French, geology, history, mathematics, 
physics and Spanish actively cooperate with the 
education and child study department in adminis- 
tering the M.A.T. program. 

The degree of master of arts in teaching is 
designed for prospective teachers in secondary 
schools. The M.A.T. program combines study in 
the field of the student's academic interest (the 
teaching field) with experience in teaching and the 
study of American education. Prospective candi- 
dates should have a superior undergraduate 
record, including an appropriate concentration — 
normally, a major — in the subject of the teaching 
field, and should present evidence of personal 
qualifications for effective teaching. Applicants are 
asked to submit scores for the Graduate Record 
Examination. 



Candidates earn the degree in one academic 
year and one six-week summer session. In most 
cases the summer program should precede that of 
the academic year. Admission prerequisites and 
course requirements vary among cooperating de- 
partments; more detailed information may be ob- 
tained from the Office of Graduate Study. To qualify 
for a degree the candidate must obtain a grade of 
B- or better in all courses or seminars, although a 
grade of C in one four-credit course may be per- 
mitted on departmental recommendation. Courses 
for graduate credit may not be taken on a satisfac- 
tory/unsatisfactory basis. 

Master of Education 

The program leading to the degree of master of 
education is designed for students who are plan- 
ning to teach in preschool or elementary schools 
and those wishing to do advanced study in the 
fields of early childhood and elementary educa- 
tion. The Department of Education and Child Stud) 
uses the facilities of two laboratory schools oper- 
ated by the college. The public schools of 
Northampton and vicinity, as well as several private 
schools, also cooperate in offering opportunities 
for observation and practice teaching. Students 
who follow the master of education program will 
ordinarily complete the state approved program in 
teacher education enabling them to meet require- 
ments for certification in various states. 

Candidates for the degree of master of educa- 
tion are selected on the basis of academic aptitudt 
and general fitness for teaching. They should sup- 
ply scores for either the Graduate Record Exami- 
nation or the Miller Analogies Test. All applicants 
should submit a paper or other piece of work tha 
is illustrative of their writing. Applicants with 
teaching experience should submit a recommen- 
dation concerning their teaching. 

Master of Education of the Deaf 

The Clarke School for the Deaf, in Northampton, 
and Smith College offer a cooperative program o 
study (one academic year and one summer) lea( 
ing to the degree of Master of Education of the 
Deaf. Rolling admissions for this program for en J 
in summer 2003 will begin after December 1, al 
though applications will be accepted as late as 



Iraduate Study 



59 



Vpril 1 5 of that year. Further information can be 
bund at www.clarkeschool.org/graduate.html. 

Vlaster of Fine Arts in Dance 

rhe Department of Dance offers a two-year pro- 
pram of specialized training for candidates who 
lemonstrate interest and unusual ability in dance. 
Choreography, performance, production, and his- 
ory and literature of dance are stressed. To count 
oward the degree, all work must earn a grade of 
it least B-, but the degree will not be awarded to 
I student who has no grade above this minimum, 
lourses for graduate credit may not be taken on a 
>ass/fail basis. The thesis requires a presentation 
>f original choreography with production designs 
jid written supportive materials. 

Interested students may consult the graduate 
tdviser, Department of Dance, Berenson Studio, 
imith College, Northampton, Massachusetts 
11063. 

faster of Fine Arts in Playwriting 

'his program, offered by the Department of The- 
tre, provides specialized training to candidates 
vho have given evidence of professional promise 
n playwriting. The Department of Theatre places 
,reat emphasis on collaborative work among de- 
igners, performers, directors and writers, thus 
iffering a unique opportunity for playwrights to 
lave their work nurtured and supported by others 
yho work with it at various levels. 

Sixty-four credit hours, including a thesis, and 
wo years of residence are required. In a two-year 
equence a student would have eight required 
ourses in directing, advanced playwriting and 
Iramatic literature and a total of eight electives at 
jiie 300 level or above, with the recommendation 
!!iat half be in dramatic literature. Electives may be 
hosen from acting, directing and design/tech 
i ourses and from courses outside the department 
;nd within the Five Colleges. To count toward the 
egree, all work must receive a grade of at least 
K but the degree will not be awarded to a stu- 
lent who has no grade above this minimum. 



Master of Science in Exercise and 
Sport Studies 

The graduate program in exercise and sport stud- 
ies focuses on preparing coaches for women's 
intercollegiate teams. The curriculum blends 
theory courses in exercise and sport studies with 
hands-on coaching experience at the college level. 
By design, the program is a small one, with only 
12 to 16 candidates in residence. This makes it 
possible for students to work independently with 
faculty and coaches. Smith has a history of excel- 
lence in academics and a wide-ranging intercolle- 
giate program composed of 14 varsity sports. 
Entrance into the two-year program requires a 
strong undergraduate record and playing and/or 
coaching experience in the sport in which a stu- 
dent will be coaching. Individuals who do not have 
undergraduate courses in exercise physiology 7 and 
kinesiology should anticipate work beyond the 
normal 51 credits. For more information contact 
Michelle Finley, Department of Exercise and Sport 
Studies, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063, 
(413) 585-3971; e-mail: mfinley@smith.edu; 
World Wide Web; http://www.science.smith.edu/ 
exer_sci/grad. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Smith College does not normally award the degree 
of doctor of philosophy, but under special circum- 
stances may consider an application. 

One year of graduate study, proficiency in two 
appropriate foreign languages, and departmental 
approval are required for admission to candidacy 
for the degree of doctor of philosophy. Applicants 
to the Ph.D. program should hold a master's de- 
gree or its equivalent. The degree requires a mini- 
mum of three years' study beyond the bachelor's 
degree, including two years in residence at Smith 
College. A major requirement for the degree is a 
dissertation of publishable caliber based on origi- 
nal and independent research. A cumulative grade 
average of B in course work must be maintained. 

Each doctoral program is planned individually 
and supervised by a guidance committee com- 
posed of the dissertation director and two other 
members of the faculty. 

The degree of doctor of philosophy is occa- 
sionally granted in the Department of Biological 



60 



Graduate Stud 



Sciences. Admission to candidacy in this depart- 
ment is achieved after passing written and oral 
examinations that are taken upon the completion 
of the student's course work. The dissertation must 
be defended at an oral examination. The depart- 
ment, however, strongly recommends that candi- 
dates for the Ph.D. degree enter the Five College 
Cooperative Ph.D. Program shared by Amherst, 
Hampshire, Mount Holyoke and Smith colleges and 
the University of Massachusetts. The Five College 
program is under the jurisdiction of the dean of the 
graduate school, University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst, Massachusetts 01003, (413) 545-0721. 
Although the University of Massachusetts grants the 
degree, the major part of the work may be taken 
within the biological sciences department at one of 
the participating institutions. 

Master/Ph.D. of Social Work 

The School for Social Work offers a master of so- 
cial work (M.S.W.) degree, which focuses on clini- 
cal social work and puts a heavy emphasis on di- 
rect field work practice. The program stresses the 
integration of clinical theory and practice with an 
understanding of the social contexts in which 
people live. It also emphasizes an understanding of 
the social policies and organizational structure 
which influence our service delivery system. In 
addition, the school offers a Ph.D. program de- 
signed to prepare MSWs for leadership positions in 
clinical research education and practice. It also 
has extensive post-graduate offerings through its 
Continuing Education Program. For more informa- 
tion on admission or program detail, call the 
School for Social Work Office of Admission at 
(413) 585-7960 or email at sswadmis@smith. 
edu. Information can also be found at the school's 
Web site at www.smith.edu/ssw. 

Nondegree Studies 

Certificate of Graduate Studies 

Under special circumstances we may award the 
Certificate of Graduate Studies to international stu- 
dents who have received undergraduate training in 
an institution of recognized standing and who have 
satisfactorily completed a year's program of study 
under the direction of the committee on graduate 
study. This program must include at least 28 cred- 



its completed with a grade of C or better. At least 
five of these courses should be above the interme- 
diate level. 

Diploma in American Studies 

This is a highly competitive one-year program 
open only to international students of advanced 
undergraduate or graduate standing. It is designee 
primarily, although not exclusively, for those who 
are teaching or who plan to teach some aspect of 
American culture and institutions. Candidates 
should have a bachelor's degree or at least four 
years of university-level work or the equivalent in 
an approved foreign institution of higher learning, 
and must furnish satisfactory evidence of mastery 
of spoken and written English. The closing date fo 
application is January 7 15. 

The program consists of a minimum of 24 
credits: American Studies 555a and 556b (special 
seminars for diploma students only), 16 other 
credits in American studies or in one or more of 
the cooperating disciplines, including the require* 
American Studies 570b, the diploma thesis. A cu- 
mulative grade average of B in course work must 
be maintained. 

Nondegree Students 

Well-qualified students who wish to take courses 
are required to file a nondegree student applica- 
tion along with an official undergraduate tran- 
script showing their degree and date awarded. 
Applications can be obtained from the Office of 
Graduate Study, Lilly Hall 106. The application 
deadline is August 1 for the fall semester and De- 
cember 1 for the spring semester. The permissior 
of each course instructor is necessary 7 at the time 
of registration, during the first week of classes 
each semester. Nondegree students are admitted 
and registered for only one semester and are not 
eligible for financial aid. Those wishing to take 
courses in subsequent semesters must reactivate 
their application each semester by the above dea< 
lines. 

Students who later wish to change their status 
to that of a part-time or full-time student working 
for a degree must apply for admission as a degre 
candidate. Credit for course work taken as a nor 
degree student may count toward the degree witl 
the approval of the department concerned. 



iraduate Study 



61 



housing and Personal 
Services 

lousing 

i very limited amount of graduate student housing 
s available on campus. Smith offers a cooperative 
praduate house with single bedrooms, large 
atchen, and no private bathrooms. Included is a 
oom furnished with a bed, chest of drawers, mir- 
or, desk and easy chair. Students provide their 
»wn board. This room-only plan is allocated on a 
rst-come, first-served basis and costs $4,510 for 
lie 2002-03 academic year. If you are interested, 
ontact the Graduate Office at (413) 585-3050 or 
end e-mail to gradstdy@smith.edu. 

For individuals wishing to check the local 
ental market, go to http://www.gazettenet.com/ 
lassifieds/ to find "Real Estate for Rent." It is 
dvisable to begin looking for housing as soon 
s you have decided to enroll. 

fealth Services 

Iraduate students, both full-time and part-time, 
re eligible to use Smith's health services and to 
articipate in the Smith College health insurance 
rogram (see p. 22 for complete information). 



^nances 

\iition and Other Fees 

pplication fee $50 

nil tuition, for the year* $25,780 

16 credits or more per semester 
art-time tuition 

Fee per credit $810 

ummer Intern Teaching Program tuition for 

degree candidates $1,250 

ontinuation fee, per semester $50 

oom only for the academic year $4,510 

stealth insurance estimate 

(if coverage will begin August 15) $1,120 

(if coverage will begin June 15) $1,270 



For additional information concerning fees for 
practical music and studio art see p. 35. 

Statements for semester fees are mailed on or 
about July 10 and December 10 from the Office of 
Student Financial Services. Payment of charges for 
the first semester is due in early August and for the 
second semester in early January. Balances unpaid 
at this time are subject to a Late Payment Fee 
equivalent to an annual percentage rate of 15 
percent. 

Deposit 

A general deposit of $100 is required from each 
student upon admittance. This is a one-time de- 
posit that will be refunded in October, or approxi- 
mately six months following the student's last date 
of attendance, after deducting any unpaid charges 
or fees, provided that the graduate office has been 
notified in writing before July 1 that a student will 
withdraw for first semester or before December 1 
for second semester. The deposit is not refunded if 
the student is separated from the college for col- 
lege work or conduct deemed unsatisfactory. It is 
not refunded for new students in the case of with- 
drawal before entrance. 

Refunds 

Please refer to page 36 for full information on 
refunds. 



Financial Aid 



The college offers a number of scholarships for 
graduate study. Amounts vary according to circum- 
stances and the money available. Holders of these 
awards may not undertake remunerative employ- 
ment without the permission of the director of 
graduate study. Applicants who wish to receive 
financial aid must submit all required graduate 
degree application materials by January 15. All 
supporting financial aid material is due by Febru- 
ary 15: the Free Application for Federal Student 
Aid (FAFSA) and a copy of student's federal tax 
return form 1040, 1040A or 1040EZ, including 
copies of all pages, schedules, and W2's. 

Several scholarships are available for interna- 
tional students. Candidates should write to the 



This entitles students to use Smith's health services. 



62 



Graduate Study 



Office of Graduate Study as early as November, 
if possible, for application forms and details about 
required credentials; completed applications 
should be received by January 15. 

Teaching fellowships are available in the de- 
partments of biological sciences, education and 
child study, exercise and sport studies, dance and 
music. For the academic year 2002-03 the sti- 
pend is $10,000 for a first-year fellow and 
$10,460 for a second-year fellow. Teaching fellows 
also receive assistance to reduce or eliminate tu- 
ition expenses. Applicants who are interested in 
teaching fellowships should note this interest on 
side two of their application for admission. Re- 
turning students should submit a letter requesting 
fellowship consideration to the Office of Graduate 
Study by January 15. 

Research fellowships are granted for work in 
various science departments as funds become 
available; stipends vary in accordance with the 
nature and length of the appointment. 

During the academic year the research fellow 
usually carries a half-time graduate program. The 
teaching and research fellowships and graduate 
assistantships are of particular value to students 
who are interested in further study or research, 
since they combine fellowship aid with practical 
experience and an opportunity to gain compe- 
tence in a special field of study. In accepting one 
of these appointments, the student agrees to re- 
main for its duration. 

All loan funds are administered by the Offices 
of Graduate Study and Student Financial Services. 
Federal William D. Ford Direct Loans may be in- 
cluded in aid offered to graduate students on ad- 
mission. Applicants must agree to begin monthly 
payments on loans soon after completion of their 
work at Smith College. 

In an effort to encourage liberal arts graduates 
to enter the teaching profession, Smith College has 
instituted a forgivable loan program for M.A.T. can- 
didates in the field of mathematics. Under this pro- 
gram prospective students can apply for loans to 
meet tuition expenses not covered by need-based 
scholarships. For each of a graduate's first three 
years of teaching, the college will forgive a portion 
of that loan up to a maximum of 65 percent. 

Requests for loan information should be ad- 
dressed to the Office of Graduate Study, Smith Col- 
lege, Northampton, Massachusetts 01063. 



Changes in Course 
Registration 

During the first 10 class days (September in the 
first semester and February in the second semes- 
ter) a student may drop or enter a course with the 
approval of the adviser. 

From the 1 1th through the 1 5th day of class, a 
student may enter a course with the permission of 
the instructor, the adviser and the director of 
graduate study. 

After the 10th day of classes a student may drop 
a course up to the end of the fifth week of the se- 
mester (October in the first semester and February 
in the second semester) : 

1) after consultation with the instructor; and 

2) with the approval of the adviser and the directo 
of graduate study. 

A student who wishes to drop a seminar or 
course with limited enrollment should do so at the 
earliest possible time so that another student may 
take advantage of the opening. Because the organi- 
zation and operation of such courses are often 
critically dependent on the students enrolled, the 
instructor may refuse permission to drop the 
course after the first 10 class days. 

Regulations governing changes in enrollment in 
courses in one of the other four colleges may be 
more restrictive than the above. Instructions and 
deadlines for registration in Five College courses 
are published by the registrar's office and included 
in the registration packet. 

Policy Regarding Completion 
of Required Course Work 

A graduate student who is unable to complete re- 
quired course work on time must submit to the di- 
rector of graduate study a written request for an 
extension before the end of the semester in which 
the grade is due. The instructor of the course shoul 
also submit a statement in support of the extension. 
If the extension is granted, the work must be com- 
pleted by the date agreed on by the director, instruc 
tor and smdent. No extensions may exceed one cal- 
endar year from the time of initial enrollment in th( 
course. The initiative in arranging for the completic 
of course work rests with the student. 



63 




64 



Courses of Study, 2002-03 





Academic 


Designation 


Division 


AAS 


I 


AFS 


i/n 


AMS 


ii 


ANS 


i/n 


ANT 


ii 


ANT 


ii 


SAN 


ii 


ANT 


ii 


ARC 


i/n 


ART 




ARU 




ARH 




ARG 




ARS 




AST 


in 


APH 


in 


BCH 


in 


BIO 


in 


CHM 


in 


CLS 




CST 




GRK 




LAT 




CLS 




CLT 




CSC 


in 


CSA 


in 


CSL 


in 


CSF 


in 


DAN 


i 



Major and Minor in the Department of Afro-American Studies 
Interdepartmental Minor in African Studies 
Interdepartmental Major in American Studies 
Interdepartmental Minor in Ancient Studies 
Majors and Minor in Anthropology 
Majors: Anthropology 

Sociology and Anthropology 
Minor: Anthropology 
Interdepartmental Minor in Archaeology 
Major and Minors in the Department of Art 
Minors: Architecture and Urbanism 
Art History 
Graphic Art 
Studio Art 
Major and Minor in the Five College Department of Astronomy 
Interdepartmental Major in Astrophysics 
Interdepartmental Major in Biochemistry 
Major and Minor in the Department of Biological Sciences 
Major and Minor in the Department of Chemistry 
Majors and Minors in the Department of Classical Languages 
and Literatures 
Major: Classical Studies 

Majors and Minors: Greek 
Latin 
Classics 
Interdepartmental Major in Comparative Literature 
Major and Minors in the Department of Computer Science 
Minors: Systems Analysis 

Computer Science and Language 
Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science 
Major and Minor in the Five College Dance Department 
Major and Minor in the Department of East Asian Languages and 
Literatures* 
Major: East Asian Languages and Cultures 
Minor: East Asian Languages and Literatures 
Interdepartmental Major and Minor in East Asian Studies 
Major and Minor in the Department of Economics 
Major and Minor in the Department of Education and Child Study 



EAL 



EAS 
ECO 
EDC 



I/U 
II 

n 



Key: Division I The Humanities 

Division II The Social Sciences and History 
Division III The Natural Sciences 

♦Currently includes Chinese (CHI), Japanese (JPN) and Korean (KOR) 



ourses of Study 



65 



lajor and Minor in the Department of Engineering 

lajor and Minor in the Department of English Language and 

Literature 
nterdepartmental Minor in Environmental Science and Policy 
nterdepartmental Minor in Ethics 
linor in the Department of Exercise and Sport Studies 
nterdepartmental Minor in Film Studies 
lajor in the Department of French Studies 
irst-Year Seminars 

lajor and Minor in the Department of Geology 
lajor and Minor in the Department of German Studies 
lajor and Minor in the Department of Government 
lajor and Minor in the Department of History 
nterdepartmental Minor in History of Science and Technology 
nterdepartmental Minor in International Relations 
lajor and Minor in the Department of Italian Language and 

Literature 
nterdepartmental Minor in Jewish Studies 
nterdepartmental Major and Minor in Latin American 

and Latino/a Studies 
nterdepartmental Minor in Logic 
nterdepartmental Minor in Marine Sciences 
lajor and Minors in the Department of Mathematics 
nterdepartmental Major and Minor in Medieval Studies 
lajor and Minor in the Department of Music 
nterdepartmental Major and Minor in Neuroscience 
lajor and Minor in the Department of Philosophy 
lajor and Minor in the Department of Physics 
iterdepartmental Minor in Political Economy 
lajor and Minor in the Department of Psychology 
iterdepartmental Minor in Public Policy 
lajor and Minor in the Department of Religion and Biblical 

Literature 
lajors in the Department of Russian Language and Literature 

Majors: Russian Literature 
Russian Civilization 
lajors and Minor in the Department of Sociology 

Majors: Sociology 

Sociology and Anthropology 

Minor: Sociology 
lajors and Minors in the Department of Spanish and 

Portuguese* 

Majors: Spanish 

Latin American Area Studies 
Portuguese-Brazilian Studies 

Minors: Spanish 

Portuguese-Brazilian Studies 
lajor and Minor in the Department of Theatre 



EGR 



III 



ENG 


I 


EVS 


III 


ETH 


I/II/III 


ESS 


III 


FLS 


I/II 


FRN 


I 


FYS 


I/II/III 


GEO 


III 


GER 


I 


GOV 


II 


HST 


II 


HSC 


I/II/III 


IRL 


II 


ITL 


I 


JUD 


I/II 


LAS 


I/II 


LOG 


I/III 


MSC 


III 


MTH 


III 


MED 


I/H 


MUS 


I 


NSC 


III 


PHI 


I 


PHY 


III 


PEC 


II 


PSY 


III 


PPL 


II/III 


REL 


I 


RUS 


I 


RUL 


I 


RUC 


I 


SOC 


II 


SOC 


II 


SAN 


11 


SOC 


II 


SPP 


I 


SPN 


I 


SLL 


I 


SPB 


I 


SPN 


I 


SPB 


I 


THE 


I 



Portuguese language courses are designated POR. 



66 



Courses of Stud 



Interdepartmental Minor in Third World Development Studies 
Interdepartmental Minor in Urban Studies 
Interdepartmental Major and Minor in Women's Smdies 

Extradepartmental Course in Accounting 

Interdepartmental Course in General Literature 
Interdepartmental Courses in Philosophy and Psychology 

Other Extradepartmental Courses 
Other Interdepartmental Courses 

Five College Course Offerings by Five College Faculty 
Five College Certificate in African Studies 
Five College Asian/Pacific/American Certificate Program 
Five College Certificate in Culture, Health and Science 
Five College Certificate in International Relations 
Five College Certificate in Latin American Studies 
Five College Certificate in Middle East Studies 
Five College Self-Instructional Language Program 

Foreign Language Literature Courses in Translation 
Interterm Courses Offered for Credit 
Science Courses for Beginning Students 



TWD 
URS 
WST 

ACC 

GLT 
PPY 

EDP 
IDP 

AFC 

APA 

CHS 

IRC 

LAC 

MEC 

SIL 



I/H 
I/II 
I/II/III 

U 
I/IH 



Deciphering Course Listings 431a 

COURSE NUMBERING 

Courses are classified in six grades indicated by 
the first digit of the course number. In some cases, 
subcategories are indicated by the second and 
third digits. 



100 level Introductory courses (open to all 

students) 
200 level Intermediate courses (may have 

prerequisites) 
300 level Advanced courses (have prerequisites) 
400 level Independent work — the last digit 
(with the exception of honors) 
represents the amount of credit 
assigned. Departments specify the 
number of credits customarily 
assigned for Special Smdies. 
400 Special Smdies (variable credit, 

as assigned) 
408d (full year, eight credits) 
410 Internships (credits as assigned) 
420 Independent Study (credits as assigned) 
430d Honors Thesis (full year, eight credits) 



Honors Thesis (first semester only, eigh 

credits) 
432d Honors Thesis (full year, 12 credits) 
500 level Graduate courses — for departments 

that offer graduate work, independent 

work is numbered as follows: 
580 Special Smdies 
590 Thesis 
900 level Reserved for courses (e.g., music 

performance) that are identifiably 

distinct from the other offerings of a 

department. 

A "j" after the course number indicates a 
course offered for credit during Interterm, and a 
"d" or "y" indicates a full-year course in which 
credit is granted after two consecutive semesters. 
In "d" courses, the final grade assigned upon 
completion of the second semester is cumulative 
for the year. 

A course in which the spring semester is a 
continuation of the fall semester is given the next 
consecutive number and fisted separately with th 
prerequisite indicated. 

Full-year courses are offered when it is not 
permissible for a student to receive credit for on 
semester only. 



)urses of Study 



67 



Language courses are numbered to provide 
unsistency among departments. 

The introductory elementary course in each 
language is numbered 100. 

The intensive course in each language is num- 
bered 1 10 or 1 1 1 and normally is a full-year 
course. 

Intermediate language courses are numbered 
120 for low intermediate and 220 for high 
intermediate. 

Introductory 7 science courses are numbered to 
xwide consistency among departments. 

The introductory courses that serve as the ba- 
sis for the major are numbered 1 1 1 (and 112 
if they continue into a second semester). "Fast 
track" courses are numbered 115 (and 116 
when appropriate). 

Courses at the introductory or intermediate 
' level that do not count toward the major are 
numbered 100-109 and 200-209- 

Courses approved for listing in multiple de- 
partments and programs are identified by the 
three-letter designation of the home depart- 
ment and are described fully in that 
department's course listings. 

0URSES WITH LIMITED ENROLLMENT 

!minars are limited to 12 students and are open 
lly to juniors, seniors and graduate students, by 
?rmission of the instructor. At the discretion of 
e instructor and with the approval of the depart- 
ent chair or the program director, 15 students 
ay enroll. The designation that a course is a 
minar appears in the title unless all seminars 
)pear as a separate and clearly designated group 
the department's course fisting. The current 
pic, if applicable, immediately follows the title of 
e seminar. 

Colloquia, primarily reading and discussion 
mrses with an enrollment limit of 20, are also 
early designated. 

Proseminars are directed courses of study 
inducted in the manner of a graduate seminar 
'it open to undergraduate students. 



INSTRUCTORS 

The following symbols before an instructors name 
in the fist of members of a department have the 
indicated meaning: 
*1 absent fall semester 2001-02 

*2 absent fall semester 2002-03 

** 1 absent spring semester 200 1-02 

**2 absent spring semester 2002-03 

f 1 absent academic year 2001-02 

f2 absent academic year 2002-03 

§ 1 director of a Junior Year Abroad Program, 
academic year 2001-02 

§ 2 director of a Junior Year Abroad Program, 
academic year 2002-03 

Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally 
appointed for a limited term. The phrase "to be 
announced" refers to the instructor's name. 

MEETING TIMES 

Course meeting times are fisted in the "Schedule 
of Classes" distributed by the registrar before 
each semester. Students may not elect more than 
one course in a time block (see chart inside back 
cover), except in rare cases that involve no conflict. 
Where scheduled hours are not given, the times of 
meeting are arranged by the instructor. 

OTHER SYMBOLS AND ABBREVIATIONS 

dem.: demonstration course 

lab.: laboratory 

Lee: lecture 

sec: section 

dis.: discussion 

( ) : A department or college name in parentheses 
following the name of an instructor in a 
course fisting indicates the instructor's usual 
affiliation. 



68 



Courses of Study 



(E) : An "E" in parentheses at the end of a course 
description designates an experimental 
course approved by the Committee on Aca- 
demic Priorities to be offered not more than 
twice. 

(C) : The history department uses a U C" in pa- 
rentheses after the course number to desig- 
nate colloquia that are primarily reading 
and discussion courses limited to 20 stu- 
dents. 

(L) : The history department uses an "L" in 
parentheses after the course number to 
designate lectures that are unrestricted in 
size. Lectures and colloquia are open to all 
students unless otherwise indicated. 

L: The dance and theatre departments use an 
"L" to designate that enrollment is limited. 

P: The dance and theatre departments use a 
"P" to designate that permission of the 
instructor is required. 

AP: Advanced Placement. See p. 50. 

S/U: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. See p. 49. 

[ ] Courses in brackets will not be offered 
during the current year. 

{ } Course listings in this catalogue indicate in 
curly brackets which area(s) of knowledge 
a given course covers (see p. 27 for a fuller 
explanation) . Please note that certain 



M 



Wl 



courses do not indicate any designation as 
decided by the department, program or 
instructor involved, e.g., English 101. Stu- 
dents who wish to become eligible for Latin 
Honors at graduation must elect at least 
one course (normally four credits) in each 
of the seven major fields of knowledge. (If 
a course is less than four credits but desig- 
nated for Latin Honors, this will be indi- 
cated. This applies to those students who 
begin at Smith in September 1994 or later 
and who graduate in 1998 or later.) Fol- 
lowing is a listing of the major fields of 
knowledge as described on pages 7-8; 
multiple designations are separated by a 
backslash, e.g., {L/H/F}: 

Literature 

Historical studies 

Social science 

Natural science 

Mathematics and analytic philosophy 

The arts 

A foreign language 

The letters Wl in boldface indicate a cour: 
is writing intensive. Each first-year student 
is required, during her first or second 
semester at Smith, to complete at least om 
writing-intensive course. 



The course listings on pp. 69-396 are maintained by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the 
Faculty. For current information on courses offered at Smith, visit www.smith.edu/cataloguc 






69 



Afro-American Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



rofessors 

homas Derr, Ph.D. (Religion and Biblical 

Literature) 
aula J. Giddings, B.A. 

ssociate Professors 

ouis E. Wilson, Ph.D. 

renda Allen, Ph.D. (Psychology) 

- Yvonne Daniel, Ph.D. (Dance and Afro- 
American Studies) 

1 Andrea Hairston, M.A. (Theatre and Afro- 
American Studies) 

nn Arnett Ferguson, Ph.D. (Afro-American 
Studies and Women's Studies), Chair 



Adjunct Associate Professor 

Carolyn Jacobs, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors 
Kevin E. Quashie, Ph.D. 
Katwiwa Mule, Ph.D. (Comparative Literature) 

Lecturers 

W.S. Tkweme, B.A. 

Tracy Vaughn, M.A. 

Wilson Post-Doctoral Fellow in the 
Humanities 

Heather Williams, Ph.D. 



indents majoring or minoring in Afro-American 
udies must take two of 111, 113, or 117. 

11 Introduction to Black Culture 

n introduction to some of the major perspectives, 
lemes, and issues in the field of African-American 
udies. Our focus will be on the economic, social 
nd political aspects of cultural production, and 
ow these inform what it means to read, write 
bout, view and listen to Black Culture. {S} 
credits 

evin Quashie 
ffered Fall 2002 

12 Methods of Inquiry 

his course is designed to introduce students to 
ie many methods of inquiry used for research 
i interdisciplinary fields such as Afro-American 
udies. Guided by a general research topic or 
terne, students will be exposed to different meth- 
ls for asking questions and gathering evidence. 
:) {S} 2 credits 
lula Giddings, Director 
ffered Spring 2003 



113 Survey of Afro-American Literature: 
1746 to 1900 

An introduction to the themes, issues, and ques- 
tions that shaped the literature of African Ameri- 
cans during its period of origin. Texts will include 
poetry, prose, and works of fiction. Writers in- 
clude Harriet Jacobs, Frances Harper, and Charles 
Chesnutt, Frederick Douglass, Phillis Wheatley. {L} 
4 credits 
Tracy Vaughn 
Offered Fall 2002 

117 History of Afro-American People to 1960 

An examination of the broad contours of the his- 
tory of the Afro-American in the United States from 
c.a. 1600- 1960. Particular emphasis will be given 
to: how Africans influenced virtually every aspect 
of U.S. society; slavery; constitutional changes after 
1865; the philosophies of W.E.B. DuBois, Booker 
T. Washington, Marcus Garvey; and the rise and 
fall of racial segregation in the U.S. to 1954. {H} 
4 credits 
Louis Wilson 
Offered Spring 2003 



70 



Afro-American Studies 



ARH 120 Introduction to Art History: Asia 

This course presents a survey of the art of Asia by 
exploring the major periods, themes, monuments 
of architecture, painting and sculpture and the 
philosophical and religious underpinnings from 
the earliest times to the 18th century. Study will be 
centered on the art of India, China and Japan with 
some attention given to Central Asia, Tibet, Sri 
Lanka, Indonesia and Korea. Enrollment limited 
to 40. {H/A} 4 credits 
Marylin Rhie 
Offered Fail 2002 

211 Black Cultural Theory 

This class will explore the tensions and affinities 
between canonical schools of contemporary cul- 
tural theory and Black cultural criticism and pro- 
duction. Prerequisite: students should have taken 
AAS 111, 113, or 117. Enrollment limited to 40. 
{L/H} 4 credits 
Kevin Quashie 
Offered Spring 2003 

218 History of Southern Africa 

The course will focus on the history of South Af- 
rica, Zimbabwe, Angola, Mozambique, Swanziland 
and Lesotho. Particular attention will be given to: 
the pre-colonial history of the region, the colonial 
systems imposed by the Dutch, and the Portu- 
guese, followed by the British; the decline of Afri- 
can political power in the nineteenth century and 
the rise and fall of white minority governments in 
the region. {H} 4 credits 
Louis Wilson 
Offered Spring 2003 

219 South African Studies 

This is a team-taught, intensive course on South 
Africa for seven students from Smith College and 
seven students from Wellesley College, taught on 
location at the University of Cape Town, South Af- 
rica. It is a multi-disciplinary examination of the 
historical, social, political, economic, cultural and 
physical environment of South Africa with particu- 
lar focus on Cape Town and the Western Cape. 
There will be day visits to key sites of historic/ 
social/scientific significance after preparation with 
readings and lectures. Enrollment limited to 7. 
Permission of the instructors required. (E) 



2 credits 

Louis Wilson 

Offered Summer 2002 

220 Women of the African Diaspora 

The course will focus on issues and themes central 
to the lives of women of the African diaspora 
through a close reading of coming of age texts 
by and about women from Africa, the Anglo- and 
Francophone Caribbean, and the United States. 
We examine a wide range of personal accounts of 
being and becoming female in a world structured 
by race, class, colonial and neo-colonial relations. 
We will explore concepts such as home and exile, 
the traditional and the modern, authenticity and 
hybridity as we follow the thread of young 
women's lives through time and across space in 
a series of journeys. {S} 4 credits 
Ann Arnett Ferguson 
Offered Spring 2003 

222 Introduction to African American Music: 
Gospel, Blues and Jazz 

The course is designed to introduce the student to 
the various music forms and their histories within 
the African-American community from the early 
nineteenth century to the present. Specifically, the 
course will focus on spirituals, folk, blues, gospel, 
and jazz. Enrollment limited to 40. (E) {A} 
4 credits 
W.S. Tkweme 
Offered Fall 2002 

237 Twentieth Century Afro-American 
Literature 

A survey of the evolution of African-American lit- 
erature during the twentieth century. This class 
will build on the foundations established in AAS A 
113, Survey of Afro-American Literature. Writers 
include Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, James I 
Baldwin, Toni Morrison, and Paule Marshall. {L} 
4 credits 
Tracy Vaughn 
Offered Spring 2003 

243 Afro-American Autobiography 

From the publication of "slave narratives" in the 
18th century to the present, African Americans 
have used first-person narratives to tell their per 



fro-American Studies 



"1 



inal story and to testify about the structures of 
)cial, political, and economic inequality faced by 
lack people. These autobiographical accounts 
rovide rich portraits of individual experience at a 
)ecific time and place as well as insights into the 
Iger sociohistorical context in which the authors 
k'ed. In addition to analyzing texts and their con- 
xts, we will reflect on and document how our 
aii life history is shaped by race. {L} 4 credits 
UN Arnett Ferguson 
ffered Spring 2003 

45 The Harlem Renaissance 

study of one of the first cohesive cultural move- 
ents in African-American history. This class will 
•cus on developments in politics, and civil rights 
n'AACP, Urban League, UNIA) , creative arts (po- 
ry, prose, painting, sculpture) and urban sociol- 
»y (modernity, the rise of cities). Writers and 
lbjects will include: Zora Neale Hurston, David 
?vering Lewis, Gloria Haull, Langston Hughes, 
id Nella Larsen among others. Enrollment lim- 
?d to 40. {S} 4 credits 
win Quashie 
ffered Fall 2002 



Louis E. Wilson 
Offered Fall 2002 

267 African American Life and Culture in 
Slavery 

This course examines the lives of enslaved African 
Americans in the southern United States. We will 
engage historiographical debates, and tackle ques- 
tions that have long concerned historians. For 
example, if slaves were wrenched from families 
and traded, could they also have maintained family 
relationships? If slaves worked from sun-up until 
sun-down, how could they create music? Drawing 
upon material culture, archaeology, folklore and 
music to complement what historians have 
learned through written records, we will attempt 
to expand our understandings of values, cultural 
practices and daily life among African American 
slaves. The texts for the course will provide us with 
rich sources for exploring nuances of slave life 
through the study of families, religion, education, 
clothing, architecture, music and art. (E) {H} 4 
credits 

Heather Williams 
Offered Fall 2002 



48 Colloquium: Gender in the Afro-American 
terary Tradition 

study of Afro-American literature through the 
ns of gender. How does the issue of gender affect 
e relationship between race and writing? Authors 
elude: Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Charles 
hnson, Ida B. Wells, Richard Wright, and John 
Igar Wideman. Prerequisites: AAS 1 13 or 237 or 
ith permission of the instructor. Enrollment lim- 
pdto20.{L} 
'acy Vaughn 
ffered Fall 2002 

i'58 Twentieth-Century Africa: A Modern 

) istory 

lis introduction to the history of Africa in the 
)th century covers the periods of colonialism 
900-45), nationalism (1945-60) and indepen- 
'nce (1960s to the present). Social content is 
Ided to the analysis by reading outstanding 

t |)rks of historical fiction authored by Africans. An 
Itempt will be made to understand the causes of 

Ad possible solutions to the crisis in Africa today. 
I/S} 4 credits 



278 The '60s: A History of Afro-Americans in 
the United States from 1954 to 1970 

An interdisciplinary study of Afro-American history 
from the Brown Decision in 1954. Particular at- 
tention will be given to the factors which contrib- 
uted to the formative years of "Civil Rights Move- 
ments," Black films and music of the era, the rise 
of "Black Nationalism," and the importance of 
Afro-Americans in the Vietnam War. Recom- 
mended background: survey course in Afro- 
American history, American history, or Afro-Ameri- 
can literature. Not open to first-year students. Pre- 
requisite: 117 and/or 270, or permission of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited to 40. {H} 4 credits 
Louis E. Wilson 
Offered Fall 2002 

350 Seminar: Race and Representation: 
Afro-Americans in Film 

This course will examine the representation of 
African Americans in U.S. cinema from two per- 
spectives. The first views the images of African 
Americans in Hollywood film and the social his- 
torical context in which these representations are 



72 



Afro-American Studies 



produced. The continuity 7 of images as well as their 
transformation will be a central theme of investi- 
gation. The second perspective explores the devel- 
opment of a Black film aesthetic through the 
works of directors Oscar Micheaux, Julie Dash, 
Spike Lee, Matty Rich and Isaac Julien. We will 
attend to their representations of blackness, and 
the broader social and political community in 
which they are located. Prerequisite: 111, 113, 
1 17 or the equivalent. {S} 4 credits 
Ann Arnett Ferguson 
Offered Fail 2002 

366 Seminar: Contemporary Topics in Afro- 
American Studies 

{S} 4 credits 

Black Performance Practices: Cuba 
This course examines the literature on Black Per- 
formance Practice with examples from and experi- 
ential practice in the diverse traditions of Cuba. It 
begins with a historical overview that surveys 
Cuba's legacy of dance and music practices from 
West and Central Africa, its influence in the 
circum-Caribbean area, and its relationship to U.S. 
African styles and orientations. Course offerings 
then shift to a pointed analysis of the differentiated 
forms of Cuban performance practice and a theo- 
retical focus on the black performing body. (The 
lab/practicum for this course is on Monday nights 
7-8:30 p.m., Cuban Dance Practice.) 
Yvonne Daniel 
Offered Fall 2002 

Race and Races in American Society 
This seminar examines influential scholarship 
across the disciplines on race and racialized rela- 
tions in American culture and society. Major topics 
include the cultural constructions of race; racial 
formations in various groups, including African, 
Mexican, Asian and European Americans; privi- 
leges of whiteness; and race as both an instrument 
of oppression and an idiom of resistance. 
Heather Williams 
Offered Fall 2002 

Passing Through the Years: Racial Passing and 
the Performance of Identity 
An examination of the phenomenon of passing as 
it is manifested through African/European Ameri- 



can identities. By engaging in close readings of 
various texts; autobiography, memoir, fiction and 
poetry, we will explore all of the ways racial pass- 
ing has been presented in 20th-century African- 
American literature and beyond. Additionally, we 
will question why the phenomenon of passing is 
considered by some scholars as pass as well as 
determine how racial passing is performed in our 
post-modern, American society. Such writers as 
Charles Chesnutt, James Weldon Johnson, Shirlee 
Taylor Haizlip, Nella Larsen, James McBride, and 
Gregory Howard Williams will be included among 
others. 

Trace)' Vaughn 
Offered Fall 2002 

Ida B. Wells and the Struggle Against Racial 
Violence 

Ida B. Wells (1862-1931) was a black investiga- 
tive journalist who began, in 1892, the nation's 
first anti-lynching campaign. In her deconstructio; 
of the reasons for, and response to, violence — am 
particularly lynching — she also uncovered the 
myriad components of racism in a formative pe- 
riod of race relations that depended on ideas of 
emerging social sciences, gender identity, and 
sexuality. The course will follow Wells's campaign 
and in the process study the profound intersec- 
tions of race, class, gender and sexuality which 
have shaped American culture and history. 
Paula Giddings 
Offered Fall 2002 

Afro-Caribbean Spirituality 
This course examines the major African religious 
orientations of the Caribbean from an anthropo- 
logical perspective. It focuses on Vodou, Santeria 
Palo, Rastafari, Winti, Obeah, and Shango. These 1 
belief systems are briefly analyzed in the context 
their connections to Catholicism, Spiritismo, an< 
Spiritual Baptist practices and to a lesser extent t 
Islam and Jewish orientations that reside in their 
proximity. The course concentrates on the discrt 
segmentation of African religious formation in 
terms of West African heritage, Central African 
heritage, and their mixture in various locales of 
the Caribbean and to some extent in their migra 
sites of the U.S. The lab/practicum for this cours 
features the integrated dance/music practices of 
Caribbean religions and meets on Monday night 



^fro-American Studies 



73 



rom 7-8:30 p.m. 
vonne Daniel 
>ffered Spring 2003 

mmanist/Feminist Thought 
lecause women of African descent stand squarely 
t the intersection of race, class, gender and sexu- 
lity, courses which focus on them also speak to 
. ider understandings of how race — black and 
on-black; gender — women and men; sexuality — 
ay/queer and heterosexual, shape academic dis- 
ourse and our everyday lives. This interdiscipli- 
ary course will provide a historical overview of 
/omanist/feminist thought — with the experience 
f African-American women at its center. The 
ourse will be organized around three major 
-ameworks that have at once shaped womanist/ 
?minist thought, and suppressed it: the perception 
f black women's sexuality in Western thought; the 
rivileging of race over gender in the activist dis- 
burse; and the role of gender in nationalist move- 
ments. 

'aula Giddings 
iffered Spring 2003 

ladings in Black and Queer 
his class will explore some of the sexual (and 
ender) identity politics of African Americans from 
le 19th century to the present. We will engage 
ome canonical concepts of queer sexualities, 
s well as encounter the ways that Black subjects 
rticulate such for themselves. Class material will 
lclude cultural theory and criticism, historical 
nd autobiographical narratives, creative and 
isual ails. Limited to 12; permission of the in- 
tructor. 
Mi Quashie 
ffered Spring 2003 

ookingfor Langston: Charting the Influence of 
fngston Hughes on Contemporary African 
merican literature 

[his seminar will be a recognition and examina- 
on of the influence of Langston Hughes on Afri- 
an-American literature from the Harlem Renais- 
ance to the present. Often viewed only for his 
oetic contributions, Hughes directly and indi- 



rectly mentored, nurtured, and fostered the liter- 
ary careers of many of America's most celebrated 
writers and poets. The focus of this seminar will 
be less on Hughes' artistic production and more 
on the literature produced by those who have 
been influenced and inspired by this seminal fig- 
ure in African-American arts and letters. We will 
include such writers and poets as Richard Wright, 
Ralph Ellison, James Balwin, Gwendolyn Brooks, 
Margaret Walker, Amiri Baraka, Alice Walker, and 
Kevin Young. 
Tracey Vaughn 
Offered Spring 2003 

370 Seminar: Modern South Africa 

In 1994 South Africa underwent a "peaceful revo- 
lution" with the election of Nelson Mandela. This 
course is designed to study the historical events 
that led to this dramatic development in South 
Africa. {H/S} 4 credits 
Louis Wilson 
Offered Spring 2003 

404 Special Studies 

Required for senior majors. 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 

Additional Courses Related to Afro-American 
Studies 

DAN 375 The Anthropology of Dance 

ECO 230 Urban Economics 

GOV 3 1 1 Seminar in Urban Politics 

HST 266 The Age of the American Civil War 

HST 267 The United States Since 1890 

HST 273 Contemporary America 

HST 275 Intellectual History of the United States 

MUS 206 Improvising History: The Development 

of Jazz* 
PHI 2 10 Issues in Recent and Contemporary 

Philosophy* 
PSY 267 Psychology of the Black Experience* 
SOC 2 1 3 Ethnic Minorities in America* 
SOC218 Urban Politics* 
THE 214 Black Theatre* 

*Courses that are Cross-listed with Afro-American 
Studies 



74 



Afro-American Studie: 



The Major 



Advisers: Members of the department. 

Basis: two of the following: 111, 113, 117. 

Requirements: nine semester courses, in addition 
to the two introductory courses, as follows: 

1. General concentration: four 100- and 200-level 
courses at least one of which must have a pri- 
mary focus on the African Diaspora. Courses at 
the 300 level may also be used where appro- 
priate; 

2. Advanced concentration: four courses orga- 
nized thematically or disciplinarily at least one 
of which must have a primary focus on the 
African Diaspora; 

3. 400 Special Studies (required for majors in 
junior or senior year). 

Internships and study abroad may be offered 
where appropriate, and with the necessary per- 
missions of the department, the Committee on 
Academic Priorities, and/or the Committee on 
Study Abroad. 

To ensure coherence and continuity, courses taken 
outside Smith must be approved by the depart- 
ment chair and the adviser. 



The Minor 

Advisers: Members of the department. 
Basis: two of the following: 111, 113, or 117. 



Requirements: In addition to the basis, four elec- 
tive courses are required, at least one of which 
must be a seminar or a 300-level course and at 
least one of which must have a primary focus on 
the African Diaspora. The elective courses, chosen 
with the assistance and approval of the adviser for 
the minor, may be arranged thematically or 
disciplinarily. 



African Diaspora Studies 

African Diaspora Studies is an essential aspect 
of the Afro-American Studies curriculum. Two 
courses on the African Diaspora are required 
for the major, and students may choose African 
Diaspora Studies as an area of concentration 
within Afro-American Studies. Interested students 
are also encouraged to consider the Five-College 
Certificate in African Studies as a supplement to 
their major. Below is a list of the faculty and 
courses relevant to Diaspora Studies. 

Faculty 

Yvonne Daniel (Afro-American Studies and Dance 
Elliot Fratkin (Anthropology) 
Paula Giddings (Afro-American Studies) 
Andrea Hairston (Afro-American Studies and 

Theatre) 
Elizabeth Hopkins (Anthropology) 
Albert Mosley (Philosophy) 
Katwiwa Mule (Afro-American Studies and 

Comparative Literature) 
David Newberry (History) 
Katherine Newberry (Government) 
Kevin Quashie (Afro-American Studies) 
Greg Mite (Government) 
Louis Wilson (Afro-American Studies) 

Courses in African Studies 

Historical Studies 

AAS 2 1 8 History of Southern Africa 
AAS 2 19 South African Studies 
AAS 220 Women of the African Diaspora 
AAS 370 Seminar: Modern South Africa 
HST 257 East Africa in the 19th and 20th 

Centuries 
HST 2 58 History of Central Africa 
HST 293 Introduction to West African History 
HST 299 Ecology and History in Africa 
HST 259 Aspects of African History: 

Decolonization in Africa 
HST 259 Aspects of African History: 

Christianity in Africa 



. 



fro-American Studies 



75 



ocial Science 

NT 230 Peoples of Africa: Population and 
Envirionmental Issues 
Africa: Continent in Crisis 
Third World Politics: Anthropological 
Perspectives 
Development in Africa 
Introduction to the Art History of 
Africa, Oceania, and the Indigenous 
Americas 

African Art: History & Modernity 
Economies of Middle East and 
North Africa 

Contemporary African Politics 
Women and Politics in Africa 
International Political Economy 
Politics of the Global Environment 
Genocide in Rwanda 
Elections in Southern Africa 
Algeria and the International System 
South Africa in Globalized Context 



NT 231 
NT 232 

NT 348 
RH130 



RH260 
o0 214 



OV227 
OV232 
OV242 
OV254 
OV321 
OV324 
OV345 
OV345 



rts, Literature and Humanities 

[1 205 20th Century Literatures of Africa 
African Women's Drama 
Studies in the Novel: The Making 
of the African Novel 
The Feminist Novel in Africa 
French Cinema: Africa and Europe 
on Screen 
African Philosophy 
Colloquium: African and Caribbean 
Theatre 



IT 267 

LT305 

IT315 

*N244 

SI 254 
HE 315 



dditional Courses Related to the African 
iaspora 

AN 142 Comparative Caribbean Dance I 
AN 243 Comparative Caribbean Dance II 
AN 272 Dance and Culture 

frican Studies Minor 

equirements: Six semester courses on Africa, 

ich to include a preponderance of material on 

ilea. Two courses must be drawn from each of 

e following three fields: 

1 Historical Studies; 

> Social Science; 

{ - Arts, Literature and Humanities. 



A minimum of three of the required courses must 
be taken at Smith. 

Language: Students interested in African Studies 
are encouraged to study French. In addition, a 
student who has achieved intermediate level com- 
petence in an African language may petition for 
this to count as one of the required courses in 
field of Arts, Literature and Humanities. 

Study Abroad: There are many study abroad op- 
portunities in Africa. Such an experience would 
gready enhance one's appreciation for the rich- 
ness and complexity of African Studies. The Afri- 
can Studies faculty would be happy to offer coun- 
sel and advice on how students may take advan- 
tage of such opportunities. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Chair of the Depart- 
ment. 



Honors 

Director: Ann Arnett Ferguson. 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

431 Thesis 

8 credits 
Offered each Fall 

Requirements: the same as those for the major, 
including the required Special Studies, and a the- 
sis, normally pursued in the first semester of or 
throughout the senior year, which substitutes for 
one or two of the courses in the major require- 
ments listed above. 



76 



American Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointe 



Daniel Horowitz, Ph.D., Professor of American 
Studies and of History, Director 

Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz, Ph.D., Professor of 
American Studies and of History, Sylvia 
Dlugasch Bauman Professor in American 
Studies 

Kevin Rozario, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
American Studies 

Steve Waksman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Music 

Jessica Neuwirth, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Sherry Marker, M.A., Lecturer 

Kenneth Myers, Ph.D., Lecturer 

Joyce Follett, Ph.D., Lecturer 

Bettina Friedl, Lecturer 

Nina Ha, M.A., Lecturer 

Barry Werth, M.S., Lecturer 



imited term. 



i 



Wilson Postdoctoral Fellow 

Tracy Leavelle, Ph.D. (Kahn Liberal Arts Institute) 

American Studies Committee 

John Davis, Professor of Art 

Richard Fantasia, Professor of Sociology 

Daniel Horowitz, Professor of American Studies 

and of History, Director 
Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz, Professor of History 

and of American Studies, Sylvia Dlugasch 

Bauman Professor in American Studies, 

Associate Director 



Richard Millington, Professor of English Language 

and Literature 
Donald Leonard Robinson, Professor of 

Government 
*' Peter Isaac Rose, Professor of Sociology and 

Director, Diploma Program in American 

Studies 
Y Susan R. Van Dyne, Professor of Women's 

Studies and of English Language and Literature 
Rosetta Marantz Cohen, Associate Professor of 

Education and Child Study 
Alice Hearst, J.D., Associate Professor of 

Government 
Christine Shelton, Associate Professor of Exercise 

and Sport Studies 
t 2 Marc Steinberg, Associate Professor of 

Sociology 
Michael Thurston, Associate Professor of English 

Language and Literature 
Louis Wilson, Associate Professor of Afro- 
American Studies 
Floyd Cheung, Assistant Professor of English 

Language and Literature 
Alexandra Keller, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Fill 

Studies 
Kevin Rozario, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

American Studies 
Steve Waksman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

Music 
Sherrill Redmon, Director of the Sophia Smith 

Collection 



120 Scribbling Women 

With the help of the Sophia Smith Collection and 
the Smith College Archives, this writing intensive 
course looks at a number of 19th and 20th cen- 
tury American women writers. All wrestled with 
specific issues that confronted them as women; 
each wrote about important issues in American 
society. Enrollment limited to 15. Priority given to 



incoming students. {L/H} Wl 4 credits 

Sherry Marker 

Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

201 Introduction to the Study of American 
Society and Culture 

An introduction to the methods and concerns of 
American Studies through the examination of a 



merican Studies 



77 



ritical period of cultural transformation: the 
890s. We will draw on literature, painting, archi- 
ecture, landscape design, social and cultural criti- 
ism, and popular culm re to explore such topics 
s responses to economic change, ideas of nature 
nd culture, America's relation to Europe, the 
uestion of race, the roles of women, family struc- 
jre, social class, and urban experience. Open to 
! 11 first and second year students, as well as to 
inior and senior majors. {L/H} 4 credits 
Wen Lefkowitz Horowitz, Kevin Rozario, 
osetta Cohen, Tracy Leavelle, Spring 2003 
ffered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

02 Methods in American Studies 

multidisciplinary exploration of different re- 
; earch methods and theoretical perspectives 
I Marxist, feminist, myth-symbol, cultural studies) 
l American studies. Prerequisite: AMS 201 or 
ermission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 
merican studies majors. {H/S} Wl 4 credits 
win Rozario, Steve Waksman, Fall 2002 
>aniel Horowitz, Spring 2003 

ffered both semesters each year 

20 Colloquium 

I nrollment limited to 20. Admission by permis- 
on of the instructor. 4 credits 

merican Indians, American Identities 
merican Indians have been important to Ameri- 
self-definitions from the colonial period to the 
ent, as vanquished foes and vanishing peoples, 
i reminders of a distant past and as an ecological 

• onscience. In recent and ongoing battles over 
:hletic mascots, place names, and other contro- 
versial issues, images of Indians have become a 
)urce of bitter conflict. Far from vanishing, how- 
/er, American Indians maintain vibrant cultures 
id distinctive identities rooted in both ancient 
aditions and modern ways. This course will ex- 
lore the interplay between the images of Ameri- 
m Indians produced in American culture and the 
nages projected by Indians themselves. The 
Durse will examine the portrayal of Indians in 
terature, art, advertising, photography, and film 

3n id will consider the meaning of these images for 
irious aspects of American identity. The constant 

id 3unterpoint to this theme will be the analysis of 

[i )urces that voice diverse expressions of American 



Indian identity. {H} 
Tracy Leavelle 
Offered Fall 2002 

Nature and Landscape in American Culture, 
1 700-1 900 

The confrontation with nature as wilderness in the 
New World became a decisive encounter for early- 
explorers, settlers, philosophers, and poets. Expe- 
riencing nature as fundamentally different from 
landscape in Europe, people arriving in North 
America needed to describe and define nature in 
terms other than those used by their European 
contemporaries. This course will focus on repre- 
sentative writings, as well as on some paintings 
and early photographs, in order to study the 
changes in attitude toward nature between 1700 
and the turn into the 20th century. Texts will trace 
the gradual evolvement of aesthetic principles in 
confronting landscape and will include the contro- 
versies surrounding the beginning of conservation- 
ism. {L/A} 
Bettina Friedl 
Offered Fall 2002 

Fashion Attitudes 

This course will explore attitudes toward fashions 
in women's dress from the early 19th to the mid- 
20th century. The goal of the course is to investi- 
gate details of changes in dress, various dress re- 
form movements, and the significance of women's 
dress that will be studied in literature, fabric, 
painting, magazine illustrations and fashion plates, 
fashion photography and film. {H/A} 
Bettina Friedl 
Offered Fall 2002 

Popular Culture 

An analytical history of American popular culture 
since 1865. We start from the premise that popu- 
lar culture, far from being merely a frivolous or 
debased alternative to high culture, is an impor- 
tant site of popular expression, social instruction, 
and cultural conflict. We examine theoretical texts 
that help us to "read"' popular culture, even as we 
study specific artifacts from television shows to 
Hollywood movies, the pornography industry to 
spectator sports, and popular music to theme 
parks. We pay special attention to questions of 
desire, and to the ways popular culture has medi- 



78 



American Studi* 



ated and produced pleasure, disgust, fear, and 

satisfaction. Alternating lecture/discussion format. 

{H/S} 

Kevin Rozario, Fall 2002 

Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

221 Colloquium 

Enrollment limited to 20. Admission by permis- 
sion of the instructor. 4 credits 

Women 's History Through Documentary 
The course surveys U.S. women's history from the 
colonial period to the present as depicted in docu- 
mentaries. The class proceeds along two lines of 
inquiry: content and form. Through screenings of 
historical documentaries supplemented by lec- 
tures, readings, and discussion, the course moves 
chronologically through an examination of major 
themes in women's experience: family, community, 
work, sexuality, and politics. At the same time, the 
class develops a critical assessment of documen- 
tary as a form, with attention to its effectiveness in 
portraying the past as historical sources and tech- 
nical methods change, its importance as means of 
transmitting history to the general public, and the 
funding and political constraints on its production, 
broadcast, and distribution. {H/S} 
Joyce Follet 
Offered Spring 2003 

Encounters, Frontiers, and Borderlands in 
American Culture 

Many observers have discovered in the frontier a 
defining feature of the American experience and a 
major source for the emergence of a uniquely 
American identity. Traditionally this view of the 
frontier and its significance referred only to the 
nineteenth-century era of Manifest Destiny and the 
rapid continental expansion of the United States. 
In a broader sense, however, frontiers are places 
that bring diverse peoples together, stimulating the 
intimate and sometimes unsettling encounters with 
difference that have always been a part of Ameri- 
can life, from the colonial era to the present. This 
more expansive understanding of the concept will 
be the basis for an exploration of cultural conflict 
and change in the early encounters between Euro- 
pean colonists and American Indians, the nine- 
teenth-century frontier of American history and 
myth, and the U.S.-Mexican border regions and 



urban neighborhoods of our own time. The 
sources for such a comparative study are rich, 
ranging from classic colonial captivity narratives 
and frontier literature to accounts of the Crown 
Heights riots in Brooklyn and John Sayles' 1996 
film Lone Star, a compelling cinematic examina- 
tion of interpersonal and interracial relations in 2 
small Texas border town. Enrollment limited to 
20. {H} 

Tracy Leavelle 
Offered Spring 2003 

230 Colloquium: The Asian American 
Experience 

Topic: Asian Women Living in the Americas. 
The 1960s and 70s marked a watershed momen 
for many people in the U.S., particularly those 
involved in such movements as Third World Lib- 
eration, Women's Rights, Queer Rights, and Civil 
Rights. Being Asian American during these times 
signaled a change in the way Asian Americans 
were perceived by U.S. mainstream society and 
how they saw themselves. However, women of 
Asian descent were most affected. After the 1965 
Immigration Act, Asian American demographics 
shifted in unprecedented ways. No longer re- 
stricted by Exclusion Acts which obstructed most 
women in Asia from emigrating to the U.S., Asian 
American women were now visible, strengthened 
by their growing numbers, and insisted upon vok 
ing their histories and experiences, which had 
been invisible and silenced by a system of 
classism, sexism, and racism. This course will 
trace the lives of women of Asian descent living ii 
the Americas — primarily in the U.S. — from their 
earliest arrival to the present. Their lives will be 
examined thematicaUy. For example, we will be 
looking at Asian American women in relation to 
the labor movement, to war, to U.S. foreign and 
domestic policy, to globalization and transnation 
alism, to popular culture, and to issues relating 1 
their families and their multiple communities. 
Readings will include such literary texts as Bone 
Out on Main Street, and Comfort Woman, as 
well as theoretical, sociological, and historical 
works such as Sweatshop Warriors, Dislocating 
Cultures, and Immigrant Acts. {L} 
4 credits 
Nina Ha 
Offered Spring 2003 



i 



American Studies 



79 



302 Seminar: The Material Culture of New 

England, 1630-1860 

Jsing the collections of Historic Deerfield, Inc., 

ind the environment of Deerfield, Massachusetts, 

itudents explore the relationship of a wide variety 

)f objects (architecture, furniture, ceramics, and 

extiles) to New England's history. Classes are held 

n Old Deerfield, MA. Admission by permission of 

he instructor. Enrollment limited. {H/A} 4 credits 

essica Neuwirtb 

)ffered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

)40 Symposium in American Studies 

imited to senior majors. Contact American Stud- 
es office for details. Topic listed below: 

lexuality Reconsidered 

Phis symposium looks at sex and sexuality in the 
J.S. past and present. It is interested both in 
.exual practices and in ideas about sex. It sees 
)oth as cultural phenomena — at least in part — 
hat change over time. At least since the early 19th 
:entury, sexuality has also disputed territory, the 
iubject of debate and conflict, within the society. 
Jsing both primary sources and commentary, the 
■ymposium will address a range of topics in 
reparation for each student undertaking a re- 
;earch project. Enrollment limited to senior ma- 
ors. {L/H} 4 credits 
lelen Lefkowitz Horowitz 
)ffered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

$41 Symposium in American Studies 

imited to senior majors, contact the American 
todies office for details. Topics follow: 

lass Culture, Media, and Morality 
Manufactured images are everywhere: on movie, 
elevision, and computer screens, on billboards 
ind buses. These images are designed to grab our 
Mention, to motivate us to acts of consumption, 
put also to educate and instruct us. Who owns 
hese images? How exactly do they work on our 
'motions and psyches? How have they shaped the 
organization of American political and economic 
ife? Why is the media saturated with images of 
iolence, and what is the relationship between 
nass culture, theories of spectacle, Hollywood 
blockbusters, news broadcasts, advertisements, 
)xfam letters, graffiti, and cartoons. {H/S} 



4 credits 

Kevin Rozario, Spring 2003 

Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

Making Sense of Sound: American Popular 
Music 

This course will explore a variety of critical ap- 
proaches to the study of music, as well as a variety 
of musical styles such as jazz, bluegrass and rock. 
Emphasis throughout the course will be twofold. 
First, what role does popular music play in the 
social and cultural life of the U.S.? How does mu- 
sic shape, and how does it give shape to, patterns 
of social division and affiliation along lines of race, 
class, gender and sexuality? Second, as the title of 
the course suggests, how do we make sense of 
sound? How do listeners and performers (and 
scholars and critics) create meaning out of the 
sounds they hear or the sounds they produce? 
{H/S} 4 credits 
Steve Waksman, Spring 2003 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

350 Seminar: Writing About American 
Society 

An examination of contemporary American issues 
through the works of such literary journalists as 
Jamaica Kincaid, John McPhee, Tom Wolfe, Joan 
Didion, and Jessica Mitford; and intensive practice 
in expository writing to develop the student's own 
skills in analyzing complex social issues and ex- 
pressing herself artfully in this form. May be re- 
peated with a different instructor and with the 
permission of the director of the program. Enroll- 
ment limited. Admission by permission of the in- 
structor. {L/S} 4 credits 
Sherry Marker 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

351 Seminar: Writing About American 
Society 

This course will focus on the theme of "America 
as Home" in modern American literary journal- 
ism. {L/S} 4 credits 
Barry Werth, Spring 2003 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

400 Special Studies 

Admission by permission of the instructor and the 

director. 1 to 4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 



80 



American Studies 



408d Special Studies 

Admission by permission of the instructor and the 

director. 8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

Internship at the 
Smithsonian Institution 

To enable qualified students to examine, under the 
tutelage of outstanding scholars, some of the finest 
collections of materials relating to the develop- 
ment of culture in America, the American Studies 
Program offers a one-semester internship at the 
Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. The 
academic program consists of a seminar taught by 
a scholar at the Smithsonian, a tutorial on re- 
search methods, and a research project under the 
supervision of a Smithsonian staff member. The 
project is worth eight credits. Research projects 
have dealt with such topics as the northward mi- 
gration of blacks, women in various sports, a his- 
tory of Western Union, Charles Willson Peak's 
letters, the rise of modernism in American art, and 
the use of infant baby formula in the antebellum 
South. 

Interns pay tuition and fees to Smith College 
but pay for their own room and board in Washing- 
ton. Financial aid, if any, continues as if the stu- 
dent were residing in Northampton. 

The program takes place during the fall semes- 
ter. It is not limited to American Studies majors. 
Students majoring in art, history, sociology, an- 
thropology, religion, and economics are especially 
encouraged to apply. Those in project-related dis- 
ciplines (e.g., art history) may consult their advis- 
ers about the possibility of earning credit toward 
the major for work done on the internship. Appli- 
cations will be available at the beginning of the 
second semester. 

410 Tutorial on Research Methods at the 
Smithsonian 

Individual supervision by a Smithsonian staff 

member. Given in Washington, D.C. {H/S} 

4 credits 

Donald Robinson, Director 

Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 



411 Seminar: American Culture: Conventions 
and Contexts 

This course is designed to give students a broad 
but intense exposure to analysis of a variety of 
American cultural forms and expressions. The 
course will have a dual focus: working on analy- 
sis — viewing, reflecting upon and debating spe- 
cific cultural forms such as movies, music, or ma- 
terial culture; emphasizing historical context 
through a variety of case studies each employing 
different methods and styles. Students will become 
familiar with different approaches to understand- 
ing cultural artifacts and the worlds that produced 
them. Open only to members of the Smithsonian 
Internship Program. Given in Washington, D.C. 
{H} 4 credits 
Kenneth Myers 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

412 Research Project at the Smithsonian 
Institution 

Tutorial supervision by Smithsonian staff mem- 
bers. Given in Washington, D.C. {H/S} 8 credits 
Donald Robinson, Director 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

Requirements for the 
American Studies Major 

Advisers: Floyd Cheung, Rosetta Cohen, John 
Davis, Rick Fantasia, Alice Hearst, Daniel 
Horowitz, Helen Horowitz, Richard Millington, 
Donald L. Robinson, Kevin Rozario, Christine 
Shelton, Marc Steinberg, Michael Thurston, Susai 
Van Dyne, Steve Waksman, Louis Wilson. 

Because of the wide-ranging interests and meth- 
ods included within the interdisciplinary America 
Studies Program, careful consultation between a 
student and her adviser is crucial to the planning 
of the major. 

In order to structure their studies of America 
society and culture, majors will select a focus — 
such as an era (e.g. antebellum America, the 
twentieth century) or a topical concentration 
(e.g. ethnicity and race, urban life, social policy, 
material culture, the family; industrialization, the 
arts, the media, popular culture, comparative 



merican Studies 



-si 



merican cultures) — which they will explore in at 
?ast four courses. It is expected that several 
ourses in the major will explore issues outside 
le theme. 

, Because American Studies courses are located 
rimarily in two divisions, Humanities and Social 
ciences, students are to balance their studies with 
ourses in each. Courses taken S/U may not be 
ounted toward the major. 

equipments: 12 semester courses, as follows: 

. 201 and 202; 

. Eight courses in the American field. At least 

I four must be focused on a theme defined by 
the student. At least two courses must be in the 
Humanities and two in the Social Sciences. At 
least two must be devoted primarily to the 
years before the twentieth century. At least one 
must be a seminar, ideally in the theme se- 
lected; 

. One course that will enable explicit compari- 
sons between the United States and another 
society, culture, or region; 

. 340 or 341. 

dviser for Study Abroad: Helen Lefkowitz 
orowitz. 

lonors 

irector: Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz. 



Diploma in American 
Studies 

Director: Peter Rose. 

A one-year program for foreign students of ad- 
vanced undergraduate or graduate standing. 

Requirements: 555 and 556 (special seminars for 
Diploma students only), three other courses in 
American Studies or in one or more of the related 
disciplines, and American Studies 570, Diploma 
Thesis (see note below) . 

555 Seminar: American Society and Culture 

Topic: Social, Political, and Cultural Issues to 

1880 

For Diploma students only. 4 credits 

Daniel Horowitz, Fall 2002 

Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

556 Seminar: American Society and Culture 

For Diploma students only. 4 credits 

Peter I. Rose 

Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

570 Diploma Thesis 

4 credits 

Peter Rose and others 

Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 



30d Thesis 

credits 

ull year course; Offered each year 

31 Thesis 

credits 

ffered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 



equipments: the same as those for the major, 
incept that a thesis (431) will be substituted for 
ivo of the eight courses in the American field. The 
lesis will be followed by a public presentation 
nd an oral honors examination in the spring se- 
lester. 



82 



Ancient Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Advisers 

Scott Bradbury, Associate Professor of Classical 

Languages and Literatures 
Patrick Coby, Professor of Government 
Karl Donfried, Professor of Religion and Biblical 

Literature 



* 2 Barbara Kellum, Professor of Art 

Susan Levin, Associate Professor of Philosophy, 

Director 
ft 2 Richard Lim, Associate Professor of History 



The minor in Ancient Studies provides students 
with the opportunity to consolidate a program of 
study on the ancient Mediterranean and Near East- 
ern worlds based on a variety of disciplinary per- 
spectives. Courses in history, art, religion, classics, 
government, philosophy and archaeology make up 
the minor. Students shape their own programs, in 
consultation with their advisers, and may concen- 
trate on a particular civilization or elect a cross- 
civilizational approach. No languages are re- 
quired. 



The Minor 



Requirements: Six courses, in no less than three 
departments, selected from the list of related 
courses below. 

Related Courses 

ARC 2 1 1 Introduction to Archaeology 

ARH208 The Art of Greece 

ARH 2 1 2 Ancient Cities and Sanctuaries 

ARH 2 16 The Art of the Roman World 

ARH 228 Islamic Art and Architecture 

ARH 3 1 5 Studies in Roman Art 

CLS190 The Trojan War 

CLS 227 Classical Mythology 

CLS 230 The Historical Imagination 

CLS 232 Paganism in the Greco- Roman World 



CLS 233 Constructions of Gender and Sexuality 

in Greco-Roman Culture 
GOV 261 Ancient and Medieval Political Theory 
HST 202 Ancient Greece 
HST 203 Alexander the Great and the 

Hellenistic World 
HST 204 The Roman Republic 
HST 205 The Roman Empire 
HST 206 Aspects of Ancient History 
HST 207 Islamic Civilization to the 15th Centur 
HST 296 The Making of Late Antiquity 
HST 302 Topics in Ancient History 
JUD 224 Women and Rabbinic Literature 
JUD 234 Introduction to Rabbinic Literature 
JUD 285 Jews and World Civilization: 300 

B.C.E.-1492 C.E. 
PHI 1 24 History of Ancient and Medieval 

Philosophy 
PHI 324 Seminar in Ancient Philosophy 
REL 2 1 Introduction to the Bible I 
REL 220 Introduction to the Bible II 
REL 225 Christian Origins: Archaeological an< 

Socio-Historical Perspectives 
REL 274 The Making of Muhammad 
REL 333 Seminar: The Social World of Early 

Christianity 

Students are to check departmental entries in th< 
catalogue to find out the year and semester whei 
particular courses are being offered. 



83 



Anthropology 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 








»rofessors 




Assistant Professors 


"Jizabeth Erickson Hopkins, Ph.D. 




* J Suzanne Zhang-Gottschang, Ph.D. 


federique Apffel-Marglin, Ph.D. 




Nancy Marie Mithlo, Ph.D. 


)onaldJoralemon, Ph.D., Chair 






1 Elliot Fratkin, Ph.D. 




Lecturers 

Chaia Heller, M.A. 


issociate Professor 




Krista Harper, Ph.D. 


*' Ravina Aggarvval, Ph.D. 




Mendenhail Fellow 

Sara Busdiecker 


tudents are strongly encouraged to 


complete ANT 


development as hominids and its behavioral cor- 


30 or ANT 131 before enrolling in 


intermediate 


relates. The uniqueness of language and technol- 


ourses. First-year students must have the permis- 


ogy as human adaptations. Contemporary political 


ion of the instructor for courses above the intro- 


implications of the agricultural revolution and the 


uctorv level. 




rise of the earlv citv and earlv state. Will our late 



.30 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 

he exploration of similarities and differences in 
le cultural patterning of human experience. The 
omparative analysis of economic, political, reli- 
ious, and family structures, with examples from 
frica, the Americas, Asia, and Oceania. The im- 
act of the modem world on traditional societies, 
everal ethnographic films are viewed in coordi- 
ation with descriptive case studies. Total emoll- 
ient of each section limited to 25. {S} 4 credits 
ancy Marie Mithlo, Chaia Heller Krista Harper, 
all 2*002 

>onaldJoralemon, Krista Harper, Spring 2003 
Donald Joralemon. Ravina AggarwaL Fall 2003 
Wot Fratkin, Sancy Marie Mithlo, Suzanne 
hang-Gottschang, Spring 200-4 
Offered both semesters each year 

.31 Perspectives on Human Behavior and 
volution 

he physiological, social and ecological premises 
f human behavior and their basis in primate so- 
ial and communication svstems. Our biological 



20th century commitment to modern technology 

and global communication prove to be a vision or 

a trap? {S/N} 4 credits 

Elizabeth Hopkins 

Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

230 Peoples of Africa: Population and 
Environment Issues 

This course looks at peoples and cultures of Africa 
with a focus on population and environmental 
change on the African continent. The course dis- 
cusses the origin and growth of human popula- 
tions, distribution and spread of language and 
ethnic groups, the variety in food production sys- 
tems (foraging, fishing, pastoralism, agriculture, 
industrialism), demographic and environmental 
consequences of slavery, colonialism, and eco- 
nomic globalization, rural and urban migration, 
health and nutritional change, and contemporary 
problems of drought and famine, and AIDS in Af- 
rica. {S/N} 4 credits 
Elliot Fratkin 
Offered Spring 2004 



84 



Anthropology 



231 Africa: A Continent in Crisis 

Africa in the postcolonial period has become em- 
blematic of the dislocations which have afflicted 
the Third World. The course will examine the so- 
cial, political, and economic ramifications of such 
issues as urbanization, class privilege, ethnicity, 
changing gender relations, sectarianism, civil war, 
and AIDS. Vie will explore their genesis in the val- 
ues and expectations of traditional African societ- 
ies, in the claims of the colonial period, and in the 
intensifying global pressures of the contemporary 
world. {H/S} 4 credits 
Elizabeth Hopkins 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

232 Third World Politics: Anthropological 
Perspectives 

The dynamics of nonwestern politics. How endur- 
ing are traditional political priorities and the colo- 
nial experience in the postcolonial world? The 
impact of urbanization, population dislocations 
and the global economy on contemporary politics 
and national identity. Topics include: the nature of 
political behavior and the political process; chang- 
ing expectations and options for women: ethnicity 
and privilege in the national arena: Christianity 
and Islam as strategies of secular resistance; the 
logic of genocide and aimed conflict. {H/S} 
4 credits 

Elizabeth Hopkins 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

237 Native South Americans: Conquest and 
Resistance 

The differential impact of European conquest on 
tropical forest, Andean, and sub-Andean Indian 
societies. How native cosmologies can contribute 
to either cultural survival or extinction as Indians 
respond to economic and ideological domination. 
{H/S} 4 credits 
Donald Joralemon 
Offered Spring 2004 

240 Anthropology of Museums 

This course critically analyzes how museums oper- 
ate as social agents in both reflecting and inform- 
ing public culture. Vfho is represented in museum 
exhibits? Vfhat messages are conveyed and for 
whom? The relationship between the development 
of anthropology as a discipline and the collection 



of material culture from indigenous populations ir 
an effort to document "vanishing races" will be 
discussed and contemporary practices of self- 
representation analyzed. Topics include the art/ 
artifact debate, corporate sponsorship, the con- 
struction of identity, indigenous curation methods, 
legislative acts such as repatriation, and contested 
ideas about authenticity and authority. (E) {S/H} 
4 credits 

Nancy Marie Mithlo 
Offered Fall 2002 

241 Anthropology of Development 

The Anthropology of Development compares three 
explanatory models — modernization theory, de- 
pendency theory, and indigenous or alternative 
development — to understand social change in the 
20 th century. Who sponsors development program: 
and why? How are power, ethnicity, and gender 
relations affected? How do anthropologists con- 
tribute to and critique programs of social and 
economic development? The course will discuss 
issues of gender, health care, population growth, 
and economic empowerment with readings from 
Africa, Asia. Oceania, and Latin America. {S} 
4 credits 

Krista Harper, Fall 2002 
Elliot Eratkin. Fall 2003 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 






242j Andean-Amazonia Spirituality and 
Agro-Biodiversity 

This course will consist of daily classroom work 
with reading and writing in the early morning fol- ' 
lowed by visits to local campesino communities, 
forested and deforested areas, and other relevant 
sites. The course will be taught in collaboration 
with three Peruvian non-governmental organiza- 
tions that have worked with the local Quechua- 
Lamista campesinos for the past six years. These 
will take the lead in the field visits part of the 
course. The region, on the border geographically 
and linguistically of the Andean and the Amazoni; 
areas, has suffered a great amount of deforestatk 
due to the opening of this area to outsiders in th( 
1960s through road construction. Monoculture 
and cash agriculture has made the local itineran 
(or slash and bum) agriculture less and less vi- ' 
able. We will try to understand the processes tha 
have led to a great amount of loss of biodiversity 






anthropology 



85 



ind of the rain forest in the region. We will also 
;tudy the adaptation to the new circumstances on 
he part of the local campesinos and the role that 
heir cultural, ritual and spiritual practices play in 
>reserving and regenerating biodiversity, 
tote: the students and the instructor will live and 
tudy in a recently constructed center on the out- 
kirts of the town of Lamas, some 25 minutes from 
he large city of Tarapoto. Arrangements for trans- 
ation during the stay have been made. Some 
mow ledge of Spanish is preferred but not re- 
mired. (E) 3 credits 
yederique Apffel-Marglin 
)ffered Interterm 2003 

243 Political Ecology 

"his course will focus on the cultural assumptions 
■mbedded in our language — as well as in other 
>ractices — which contribute to the ongoing eco- 
ogical crisis. Through readings and discussions, 
he course attempts to understand what promotes 
■co-justice and what stands in its way. The course 
vill focus on a few case studies such as agricul- 
ure, the loss of biodiversity and toxic waste. For 
hose students who are interested in hands-on 
rork, an option of undertaking a project relating 
o the greening of the Smith campus will be pro- 
ided. Other students can choose a research 
>roject of their choice in consultation with the 
nstructor. {S} 4 credits 
rede riq tie Apffel-Marglin 
tffered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

244 Colloquium: Gender, Science, and 
Culture 

lie starting point for this course will be feminist 
nthropological studies of the biology of women's 
>odies. The course is located at the intersection of 
eminist critiques of science, ethnographic studies 
)f modem Western scientific practices, and the 
lew historiography of science. The course will 
ange from women's explicit exclusion from the 
beginnings of science in 16 th and 17 lh century 
Western Europe to contemporary practices of in 
itro fertilization and germ-line engineering. Lim- 
ted enrollment. {S} 4 credits 
■rederi que Apffel-Marglin 
)ffered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 



248 Medical Anthropology 

The cultural construction of illness through an 
examination of systems of diagnosis, classification, 
and therapy in both non-Western and Western 
societies. Special attention given to the role of the 
traditional healer. The anthropological contribu- 
tion to international health care and to the training 
of physicians in the United States. Enrollment lim- 
ited to 30. {S/N} 4 credits 
Donald Joralemon 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

249 Visual Anthropology 

The process of translating culture by visual repre- 
sentation often infers notions of authority, objectiv- 
ity and fixed reality. Contextual and revisionist 
strategies in visual anthropology challenge these 
earlier interpretative models by incorporating 
multiple perspectives and making theoretical aims 
explicit. This course addresses the use of visual 
recording in anthropology both as a documentary 
research method and as an exploration of unique 
visual worlds. Works analyzed include the visual 
arts, film, photography, museum exhibits and ma- 
terial culture. Global concerns such as appropria- 
tion, commercialization and representation will be 
discussed in case study analyses. Subject to the 
approval of the Committee on Academic Priorities. 
{S} 4 credits 
Nancy Marie Mi thlo 
Offered Fall 2003 

250 Native American Representations 

This course offers an overview of the historic and 
contemporary experiences of Native people in 
North America through an examination of oral 
history, autobiography, art, ethnographic texts, 
film, and scholarly analysis. The impact of govern- 
ment policies including relocation, will be dis- 
cussed as well as tribal self determination efforts 
such as cultural resource management, language 
retention and enrollment policies. The articulation 
of indigenous knowledge systems in understand- 
ing environmental, health and educational issues 
will be highlighted as well as varying ideas of gen- 
der and power. Native American women's life his- 
tories and perspectives will be emphasized. (E) 
{S} -i credits 
Saner Marie Mithlo 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 



86 



Anthropology 



253 Introduction to East Asian Societies and 
Cultures 

This course provides a survey of the anthropology 
of contemporary East Asian societies. We will ex- 
amine the effects of modernization and develop- 
ment on the cultures of China, Japan, and Korea. 
Such topics as the individual, household and fam- 
ily; marriage and reproduction; religion and ritual; 
and political economic systems are introduced 
through ethnographic accounts of these cultures. 
The goal of this course is to provide students with 
sufficient information to understand important 
social and cultural aspects of modern East Asia. 
(E) {S} 4 credits 
Suzanne Zhang-Gottschang 
Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2004 

254 Women and Resistance in South Asia 

This course starts by examining the representa- 
tions of South Asian women in colonial and 
postcolonial discourses. It assesses personal and 
collective acts of resistance and feminist interven- 
tions in debates around nationalism, violence, 
religion, caste, sexuality, family, and development. 
Class discussions are based on narratives drawn 
from ethnographic, historical, and literary sources 
as well as guest lectures and films. {S} 4 credits 
Ravina Aggarwal 
Offered Spring 2004 

255 Dying and Death 

Death, the "supreme and final crisis of life" 
(Malinowski), calls for collective understandings 
and communal responses. What care is due the 
dying? What indicates that death has occurred? 
How is the corpse to be handled? The course uses 
ethnographic and historical sources to indicate 
how human communities have answered these 
questions, and to determine just how unusual are 
the circumstances surrounding dying in the con- 
temporary Western world. Enrollment limited to 
30. Prerequisite: 130 or permission of the instruc- 
tor. {H/S} Wl 4 credits 
Donald Joralemon 
Offered Spring 2003 

258 Performing Culture 

This course analyzes cultural performances as 
sites for the expression and formation of social 
identity. Students study various performance 



genres such as rituals, festivals, theater, music, 
dance, parades and functions. Topics include ex- 
pressive culture as resistance, debates around 
authenticity, the performance of gender, race, and 
class identities, nationalism and ethnicity, the ef- 
fects of globalization on indigenous performances 
and the transformation of folk performances in the 
wake of radio, film, and television. Enrollment 
limited to 30. {L/H/S} 4 credits 
Ravina Aggarwal 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

260 Ethnography of Eastern Europe 

This course surveys ethnographic research on 
Eastern European society and culture during a 
period of tremendous upheaval: the transforma- 
tion from state socialism. Anthropologists working 
in the region focus on how individuals and com- 
munities experience cultural change, from the 
collapse of the Soviet empire in 1989 to the war in 
Yugoslavia to forecasts of Poland and Hungary's 
accession to the European Union in 2004. Stu- 
dents will study how contemporary life in Eastern 
Europe is shaped by the past, exploring two key 
questions, "What was socialism, and what comes 
next?" The course will discuss legacies of state 
socialism and dissidence, nationalism and ethnic 
identity, gender issues, "civil society" and other 
regional development discourses, and emerging 
inequalities in postsocialist societies. The course 
integrates critical analyses of Eastern Europe cin- 
ema with a close examination of ethnographic 
texts. Readings are drawn primarily from the eth- - t 
nographic literature on Eastern Europe, with addi- 
tional readings on the former Soviet Union. (E) 
{S} 4 credits 
Krista Hatper 
Offered Spring 2003 

330 History of Anthropological Theory 

A survey of anthropological ideas and practices 
from the 19th century to the present. Topics in- 
clude social evolutionism, French and British 
structuralism, cultural materialism, symbolic an- 
thropology, the politics and poetics of fieldwork 
and ethnography, and experimental ethnography 
(feminist, indigenous, and self-reflective ethnogn 
phy) . Open only to junior and senior anthropoloj 
majors or minors. {S} 4 credits 
Suzanne Zhang-Gottschang, Fall 2002 
Offered Fall 2002 






jithropology 



87 



Seminars 

t40 Seminar: Postcolonial Politics: Identity, 
•ower and Conflict in the Developing World 
vliat common features define national political 
iterests, privilege, and personal security in the 
; ! eveloping world? The seminar will explore the 
i ontemporary logic that sustains individual strate- 
t ies for survival, the power of the elites, and the 
i rominence of armed conflict as a national and 
egional agenda. Topics include: ethnicity and 
I ectarianism as political identity; Islam and Chris- 
I anity as ideologies of engagement and resistance; 
le unprecedented human cost of postcolonial 
I onflicts: refugees, child soldiers, and ethnic 
* enocide. {H/S} 4 credits 
I lizabeth Hopkins 
•ffered Fall 2002 

41 Seminar: Sacred Power in Secular 

I olitics: Ideology, Legitimacy and Action 

he central and persistent historical role of sacred 
?gitimacy in the secular political arena. Compara- 
\ ve survey of witchcraft, prophetic cults, sectarian 
hristianity, radical Islam and American funda- 
i lentalism as vehicles of protest and change. The 
( 3le of millenarian movements and Liberation 
neology in the creation of a national identity. Case 
oidies will include sub-Saharan Africa, Latin 
merica, Native North America, the Middle East 
nd modern American society. {H/S} 4 credits 
lizabeth Hopkins 
'ffered Fall 2003 

42 Seminar: Topics in Anthropology 

credits 

bpic: Motherhood 

lotherhood integrates economic, political, bio- 
)gical and social processes. The study of mother- 
ood in the early days of anthropology frequently 
>cused on how it functioned in terms of kinship 
nd reproduction. With the developments in femi- 
ist theory within and outside of anthropology, 
owever, we have come to understand that moth- 
rhood may provide insights into structures of 
jlower, dynamics of gender relations, identity poli- 
ces as well as economic relations. This research 
as destabilized a naturalized understanding of 
lothering. As a result, motherhood as an institu- 



tion and experience is understood to vary across 
time and space, history; society and culture. Moth- 
erhood will be treated here as a cluster of prac- 
tices, ideas and experiences that are linked to 
issues of sexuality, reproduction, power and au- 
thority, personhood, consumption, morality and 
social order and disorder. Our purpose in this 
seminar is to review some of the major works on 
motherhood produced by anthropologists in re- 
cent years and contextualize them in light of femi- 
nist theory. {S} 4 credits 
Suzanne Zhang-Gottschang 
Offered Spring 2003 

Topic: To be announced. 
Ravina Aggarwal 
Offered Spring 2004 

Topic: The Anthropology of Food 
This seminar employs anthropological approaches 
to understand the role of food in social and cul- 
tural life. Using ethnographic case studies from 
East Asia, Latin America, Africa and the United 
States, the course will examine topics such as bio- 
cultural dimensions of food and nutrition; food 
and nationalism; symbolic value of food; food and 
identity; food taboos and restrictions; etiquette and 
manners in eating; body image and eating; 
transnationalism and global food industries; fam- 
ine and food policy. Through the investigation of 
these topics, students will also gain an understand- 
ing of major theoretical trends and debates in 
anthropology 7 . Students will conduct small field- 
based research projects as a part of their partici- 
pation in the seminar. {S} 4 credits 
Suzanne Zhang-Gottschang 
Offered Spring 2005 

343 Seminar: Travel, Tourism and Culture 

This course examines travel as a way of knowing 
the world using ethnographies, travelogues, films, 
tourist brochures and guidebooks. Topics include 
the transforming role that travel plays in the repre- 
sentation of other places and peoples, the emer- 
gence and organization of mass tourism, its im- 
pact on identity, family, race and class statuses of 
both hosts and guests, global economic pressures 
and sites of resistance to tourism, possible ways to 
ensure alternative and responsible travel. Prereq- 
uisite: permission of the instructor. {S} 4 credits 



Anthropology 



Ravina Aggarwal 
Offered Fall 2002 

344 Seminar: Topics in Medical Anthropology 

Topic: Healers in Cultural Perspective. The semi- 
nar will focus on healing roles, from shamans to 
surgeons and on the cultural underpinnings of 
their practices. Student projects will seek to ex- 
tend traditional ethnomedical analyses to incorpo- 
rate a political/economic perspective. Prerequi- 
site: 248 or permission of the instructor. {S} 
4 credits 

Donald Joralemon 
Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2004 

347 Seminar: Topics in Anthropology 

Topic: Ethnographic Film Studies 
This course considers the history and development 
of ethnographic and transcultural filmmaking. It is 
an in-depth exploration of important anthropo- 
logical films in terms of content, methodology and 
techniques. The multiple and sometimes conflict- 
ing motivations of filmmakers, subjects, sponsors 
and audience will be examined with a consider- 
ation given to the challenges of new anthropologi- 
cal paradigms and indigenous media productions. 
Issues of gender, authorship and power are dis- 
cussed through screenings, lecture, ethnogra- 
phies, theoretical readings and classroom discus- 
sions. Students will develop a critical perspective 
for viewing films, videos and representations. This 
course requires additional weekly film screenings 
outside of class. {H/S} 4 credits 
Nancy Marie Mithlo 
Offered Spring 2003, Fall 2003 

348 Seminar: Topics in Development 
Anthropology 

Topic: To be announced. 
Krista Harper 
Offered Spring 2003 

The Anthropology of War 
How do anthropologists understand and explain 
warfare? Why is warfare as much a part of human 
culture as marriage, ritual, or music? This seminar 
reviews the contradictions, moral as well as ana- 
lytical, in our attitudes to primitive warfare and 
modern war. We will look at anthropological treat- 



ments of warfare in tribal societies, early states, 
and modern inter-state war including World War 
Two and Vietnam. Students will also look at writ- 
ings dealing with privatized memories of men's 
and women's war experiences in China, Cuba, 
post-colonial Africa, Bosnia and Israel/Palestine. 
{S} 4 credits 
Elliot Fratkin 
Offered Fall 2003 

Cross-listed and 
Interdepartmental Courses 

DAN 375 The Anthropology of Dance 

General Courses 

400 Special Studies 

By permission of the department, for junior and 
senior majors. 2 to 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 

408d Special Studies 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

The Major in Anthropology 

Advisers: Ravina Aggarwal, Frederique Apffel- 
Marglin, Elliot Fratkin, Elizabeth Hopkins, Donald 
Joralemon, Nancy Marie Mithlo, Suzanne Zhang- 
Gottschang. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Suzanne Zhang- 
Gottschang (2002-2003); To be announced, 
(2003-2004). 

Requirements: 130 or 131 (basis), 330, one sent 
nar in the department at Smith, and five additiona 
courses in anthropology. The remaining three 
courses may be in anthropology or in related sub 
jects with the approval of the adviser. 

Students majoring in anthropology are encour- 
aged to consider an academic program abroad 
during their junior year. In the past, majors have 
spent a term or year in India, Kenya, Senegal, 






Anthropology 



89 



South Africa, Scotland, Ecuador, Mexico, Costa 
*ica, and Nepal. Students planning to spend the 
unior year abroad should take at least one but 
)referably two courses in anthropology during the 
sophomore year. Students should discuss their 
;tudy abroad plans with advisers, particularly if 
hey wish to do a special studies or senior thesis 
lpon their return. 

Majors interested in archaeology or physical an- 
hropology may take advantage of the excellent 
•esources in these two areas at the University of 
/lassachusetts or enroll in a heldwork program at 
l training university during their junior year. 

rhe Major in Sociology and 
\nthropology 

Advisers: Ravina Aggarwal, Frederique Apffel- 
darglin, Richard Fantasia, Elliot Fratkin, Myron 
ilazer, Elizabeth Hopkins, Donald Joralemon, 
'atricia Miller, Nancy Marie Mithlo, Peter Rose, 
dare Steinberg, Nancy Whittier, Suzanne Zhang- 
iottschang. 

•tudents majoring in sociology 7 and anthropology 
teed two advisers, one in the sociology program 
nd one in the anthropology program. 

Requirements: 10 semester courses above the 
•asis. 

OC 101 (basis) and ANT 130 or ANT 131 (basis), 
OC 201, SOC 250, ANT 330, a seminar in sociol- 
>gy, a seminar in the anthropology department, 
m additional courses in sociology, three addi- 
lonal courses in anthropology. 



The Minor in Anthropology 

Advisers: Ravina Aggarwal, Frederique Apffel- 
Marglin, Elliot Fratkin, Elizabeth Hopkins, Donald 
Joralemon, Nancy Marie Mithlo, Suzanne Zhang- 
Gottschang. 



Basis: 130 or 131. 

Requirements: in addition to the basis, five elective 
courses are required, one of which must be either 
330 or a seminar in the department. 

Honors 

Director: Elizabeth Hopkins. 

Basis: 130 or 131 for the anthropology major, ANT 
130 or ANT 131 and SOC 101 for the sociology 
and anthropology major. 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

431 Thesis 
8 credits 
Offered each Fall 

432d Thesis 

12 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

Requirements: 

1 . A total of eight courses above the basis, includ- 
ing all the requirements for the major. 

2. A thesis (430, 432) written during two semes- 
ters, or a thesis (431) written during one se- 
mester. 

3. An oral examination on the thesis. 



90 



Archaeology 






Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Advisory Committee 

f ' H. Allen Curran, Professor of Geology 

Karl Donfried, Professor of Religion and Biblical 

Literature 
Elizabeth Hopkins, Professor of Anthropology 
Caroline Houser, Professor of Art 
* 2 Barbara Kellum, Professor of Art 
Dana Leibsohn, Associate Professor of Art, 

Director 
t 1, t2 Richard Lim, Associate Professor of History 



Christopher Loring, Director of Libraries 

Nancy Mithlo, Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

§' Thalia Pandiri, Professor of Classical Languages 

and Literatures and of Comparative Literature 
* 2 Neal Salisbury, Professor of History 
Marjorie Senechal, Professor of Mathematics 

Lecturer 

Susan Heuck Allen, Ph.D. 



The interdepartmental minor in archaeology is a 
complement to any one of several departmental 
majors. Archaeological methods and evidence can 
be used to illuminate various disciplines and will 
aid the student in the analysis of information and 
data provided by field research. 

211 Introduction to Archaeology 

An introduction to interdisciplinary archaeological 
inquiry. The goals of archaeology; concepts of time 
and space; excavation techniques; ways of order- 
ing and studying important categories of finds 
such as pottery; bones, stone and metal objects, 
and organic materials. Archaeological theory and 
method and how each affects the reconstruction of 
the past. Illustrative material, both prehistorical 
and historical, will be drawn primarily but not 
exclusively from the culture of the Mediterranean 
Bronze Age and the time of Homer. Enrollment 
limited to 30. {H/S} 4 credits 
Susan Heuck Allen 
Offered Fall 2002 

400 Special Studies 

By permission of the Archaeology Advisory Com- 
mittee, for junior or senior minors. 2 or 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 



The Minor 

Requirements: 
1. ARC211. 



2. A project in which the student works outside ol 
a conventional classroom but under appropriate 
supervision on an archaeological question ap- 
proved in advance by the Advisory Committee. The 
project may be done in a variety of ways and 
places; for example, it may be excavation (field 
work) , or work in another aspect of archaeology 
in a museum or laboratory, or in an area closely 
related to archaeology 7 such as geology or com- 
puter science. Students are encouraged to pro- 
pose projects related to their special interests. 

This project may be, but does not need to be, 
one for which the student receives academic 
credit. If the project is an extensive one for which 
academic credit is approved by the Registrar and 
the Advisory Committee, it may count as one of th< 
six courses required for this minor. 

3. Four additional courses (if the archaeological 
project carries academic credit) or five (if the 
archaeological project does not carry academic 
credit) are to be chosen, in consultation with the 
student's adviser for the minor, from the various 
departments represented on the Advisory Commii 
tee (above) or from suitable courses offered else 
where in the Five Colleges. A fist of possible 
courses is available from the advisers. 

No more than two courses counting toward tl 
student's major program may be counted toward 
the archaeology 7 minor. Only four credits of a Ian 
guage course may be counted toward the minor. 



91 



Art 



B 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

Elliot Offner, M.F.A. 

Marylin Martin Rhie, Ph.D. (Art and East Asian 

Snidies) 
f 2 Chester J. Michalik, M.F.A. 
Jaroslaw Volodymyr Leshko, Ph.D. 
** : Dwiglit Pogue, M.F.A. 
Gary L. Niswonger, M.F.A. 
Craig Felton, PhD 
Caroline Houser, Ph.D. 
Susan Heideman, M.F.A., Associate Chair 
John Davis, Ph.D., Chair 
* 2 Barbara A. Kellum, Ph.D. 

Associate Professors 

* 2 A. Lee Burns, M.F.A. 
t 2 Brigitte Buettner, Ph.D. 
t'John Moore, Ph.D. 
Dana Leibsohn, Ph.D. 



Visiting Assistant Professor 

John Peffer, Ph.D. 

Lecturers 

Carl Caivano, M.F.A. 
Katherine Schneider, M.F.A. 
Suzannah Fabing, A.M. 
Martin Antonetti, M.S.L.S. 
John Gibson, M.F.A. 
Karen Koehler, Ph.D. 
Gretchen Schneider, M. Arch. 
Meridel Rubenstein, M.A., M.F.A. 
Susan Greenspan, M.F.A. 
Rebecca Senf, M.A. 

Barry Moser, B.S. (Art and Religion and Biblical 
Literature) 

Mellon Post-doctoral Fellow and Lecturer 

Anna Sloan, Ph.D. 



Harnish Visiting Artist 

Barbara Lattanzi, M.A. 



Assistant in Architecture 

Sonya Sonfield 



Assistant Professors 

Roger Boyce, M.F.A. 
Frazer Ward, Ph.D. 



Research Associate 

Mark Morford, Ph.D. 



The Department of Ail believes that visual literacy 
is crucial to negotiations of the contemporary 
world. Consequently, equal weight is given to stu- 
dio practice and historical analysis. Courses focus 
on images and the built environment and seek to 
faster an understanding of visual culture and hu- 
man expression in a given time and place. 

Students planning to major or to do honors 
work in art will find courses in literature, philoso- 



phy, religion, and history taken in the first two 
years valuable. A reading knowledge of foreign 
languages is useful for historical courses. Each of 
the historical courses may require one or more 
trips to Boston, New York, or other places in the 
vicinity for the study of original works of art. 

Courses in the history of art are prefixed ARH; 
courses in studio art are prefixed ARS. 



92 



Art 



A. THE HISTORY OF ART 
Introductory Courses 



Courses at the 100 level are open to all students; 
there are no prerequisites. 

ARH 101 Approaches to Visual 
Representation (C) 

Emphasizing discussion and short written assign- 
ments, these colloquia have as their goal the devel- 
opment of art historical skills of description, 
analysis, and interpretation. Each section is limited 
to 20 students. 

Advertising and Visual Culture 
By analyzing advertisements — from ancient 
Pompeian shop signs and graffiti to contemporary 
multi-media appropriations — this course will 
seek to understand how images function in a wide 
array of different cultures. In developing a histori- 
cal sense of visual literacy, we'll also explore the 
shifting parameters of "high" art and "low" art, 
the significance of advertising in contemporary art, 
and the structuring principles of visual communi- 
cation. {H/A} 4 credits 
Barbara Kellum 
Offered Fall 2002 

Buddhist Art 

Selected themes and monuments of Buddhist art 
from India, China, and Japan, introducing the 
stupa, images of the Buddha and Bodhisattva, nar- 
rative relief, cave temple art, painting, and temple 
architecture. {H/A} 4 credits 
Marylin Rhie 
Offered Fall 2002 

Art and Death 

Through an examination of key architectural, 
sculpted, and painted monuments from a variety 
of different cultures we will study funerary beliefs 
and rituals, asking how art has been mobilized 
across the ages to frame the disruptive experience 
of death. {H/A} 4 credits 
Brigitte Buettner 
Offered Spring 2003 



Art and Consumption 

This course focuses on the concept of consump- 
tion as a device for reading the history of art and 
architecture. We will explore how art is made, 
how art is used, and how art is made by being 
used; how artists consume art and visual culture in 
their construction of original works; and how the 
meanings of art objects are transformed through 
and across the contexts of ritual, display, public 
promotion, and critique. Examples will be drawn 
from Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas. 
John Peffer 
Offered Fall 2002 

The Home as a Work of Art 
Using examples of domestic design throughout the 
world and the ages, we will examine in detail vari- 
ous facets of the setting and the building, its spatial 
organization, materials, and accoutrements, and 
the way it serves and represents ideas about gen- 
der, the family as a social and productive unit, and 
moral and aesthetic values. {H/A} Wl 4 credits 
Karen Koehler 
Offered Spring 2003 

Realism: The Desire to Record the World 
Throughout history, artists have sought to recreate 
the natural world; indeed "Realism" has been a 
driving force behind representation from the earli- 
est human-made images to the invention of pho- 
tography to computer-generated pictures. In some 
cases, this Realist intention has meant designing 
the built environment to human scale; in others it 
has meant trying to record seasonal changes and 
simple human activities; in others still Realism has 
been used to suggest the presence of the divine in 
everyday objects. Whether accurately or symboli- 
cally, through the blatant use of materials or 
through virtuoso trickery, artists have consistently 
tried to transfer scenes from the "real world" onto 
other surfaces or sites. This course will explore 
the artistic motivation of Realism formally, the- 
matically, and contextually from ancient times to 
the present. {H/A} Wl 4 credits 
Karen Koehler 
Offered Fall 2002 

Approaching the Body 

The art, architecture and popular culture of differ 

ent societies and historical periods have fanta- 



\Y\ 



93 



;ized, described, implied, performed, repressed, 
;ven banished the human body; in widely divergent 
vays. What do these different approaches tell us, 
ibout the body itself, and about the artistic, his- 
orical and cultural contexts in which it emerges? 
Reusing on a series of case studies drawn from a 
•ange of contexts, from the medieval to the con- 
emporary and seeking appropriate methods of 
isual analysis, we will listen to what the body has 
o tell us. Wl {H/A} 4 credits 
mzer Ward 

)ffered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 

\RH 130 Introduction to Art History: Africa, 
)ceania. and Indigenous Americas 

"his course examines how images and objects 
nade by Africans, Pacific Islanders, and Native 
unericans create meaning - in both their original 
ustorical settings and those of Euro-American 
nuseums, galleries, and tourist sites. Among the 
naterials we examine: Inca architecture from 
iouth America, sculpture and photography from 
Vest Africa, and contemporary paintings from 
aistralia. Over the semester we will study specific 
•ultural traditions at particular historical monu- 
nents, visit museums and galleries, and become 
amiliar with academic and popular vocabularies 
nd theories for discussing African, Oceanic and 
ndigenous American arts. Enrollment limited to 
tO. {H/A} 4 credits 
)ana Leibsohn 
)ffered Spring 2003 

tRH 140 Introduction to Art History: 
Vestern Traditions 

Tiis course examines a selection of key buildings, 
mages, and objects created from the prehistoric 
ra, the ancient Mediterranean and medieval 
imes, to European and American art of the last 
•00 years. Over the semester we will study specific 
isual and cultural traditions at particular histori- 
al moments, and become familiar with basic ter- 
oinology, modes of analysis and methodologies 
ti an history. Enrollment limited to 40. {H/A} 
i credits 

Wgitte Buettner. Craig Felton 
)ffered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 



Lectures and Colloquia 

GROUP I 

ARH 200 Art Historical Studies (C) 

Topic: Gladiators and Actors in Ancient Rome. This 
course focuses on the culture heroes of the Ro- 
man empire: the men and women who performed 
as gladiators and actors. All aspects of gladiatorial 
and theatrical performances will be considered: 
the vast amphitheaters and theaters in which they 
took place, the accoutrements and staging of 
events, and the commemoration of individual per- 
formances in every medium, from graffiti and cake 
molds to heroic statues and funerary monuments. 
The significance of Rome's fascination with gladia- 
tors and actors and recent scholarly and filmic 
interpretations of it will play a pivotal role. {H/A} 
4 credits 
Barbara Kellum 
Offered Fall 2002 

ARH 204 Pre-Columbian Arts (C) 

Pre-Hispanic visual culture will be the focus of 
this class. We will cross both Mesoamerica and 
the Andes, giving particular attention to the Aztecs, 
Inca and Maya. Along with architecture, textiles, 
sculpted works and book arts, we will consider 
current debates in art history and archaeology. 
Among the themes we will discuss: collecting and 
questions of cultural patrimony; tourism and its 
ties to archaeology; relationships between art his- 
torical and anthropological modes of interpreta- 
tion. Enrollment limited to 20. {H/A} 4 credits 
Dana Leibsohn 
Offered Fall 2002 

ARH 208 The Arts of Greece (L) 

An introduction to the sculpture, architecture, 
painting, and minor arts made by ancient Greek 
artists from the time of the Minotaur to the fall of 
Cleopatra. Emphasis on analyzing artistic expres- 
sions of changing cultural values with attention to 
social, religious, and political ideas and ideals. 
{H/A} 4 credits 
Caroline Honser 
Offered Fall 2002 



94 



An 



ARH 216 The Art and Architecture of the 
Roman World (L) 

From North Africa to Gaul, from the Pillars of Her- 
cules (Straits of Gibraltar) to Asia Minor, the inter- 
relationships of art and power in the visual culture 
of the ethnically diverse Roman empire, from the 
first century B.C.E. through the fourth century C.E., 
will be the subject of study. We will also examine 
works of art from later periods as well as litera- 
ture and film that structure our perception of the 
Roman world. {H/A} 4 credits 
Barbara Kellum 
Offered Spring 2003 

GROUP II 

ARH 220 Art Historical Studies (C) 

Topic: Relics and Reliquaries 
Interdisciplinary study of artistic, economic, social, 
and ritual aspects of the cult of relics. While the 
course will focus on the medieval West, some con- 
sideration will be given to similar phenomena in 
other cultural areas and in modern times. Permis- 
sion of the instructor is required. {H/A} 4 credits 
Brigitte Buettner 
Offered Spring 2003 

ARH 224 The Art of Japan (L) 

The art of Japan, especially painting, sculpture, 
architecture, and color prints. Particular attention 
given to the roles of native tradition and foreign 
influences in the development of Japanese art. 
{H/A} 4 credits 
Marylin Rhie 
Offered Spring 2003 

ARH 228 Islamic Art and Architecture (L) 

This course surveys the architecture, landscape, 
book arts, and luxury objects produced in Islamic 
contexts from Spain to India, and from the 7th 
through the 20th centuries. Attention will be fo- 
cused upon the relationships between Islamic 
visual idioms and localized religious, political, 
and socioeconomic circumstances. In particular, 
lectures and readings will examine the vital roles 
played by theology, royal patronage, ceremonial, 
gift exchange, trade, and workshop practices in 
the formulation of visual traditions. Recom- 
mended background 101 or 140 (E) {H/A} 
4 credits 



Anna Sloan 

Offered Spring 2003 

ARH 230 Early Medieval Art (L) 

Architectural, sculpted, and pictorial arts from 
the Migration, Hiberno-Saxon, Carolingian, and 
Ottoman periods. Exploration of early medieval 
systems of representation, with special emphasis 
on cross-cultural relationships; "paganism" and 
Christianity; royal, monastic, and female patron- 
age. {H/A} 4 credits 
Brigitte Buettner 
Offered Fall 2002 

GROUP in 

ARH 240 Art Historical Studies (C) 

Topic: Hybrid-Multicultural-Traditional African An 
One of the characteristics of African cultures has 
been their ability to incorporate foreign ideas in a 
dynamic fashion. This course examines art making 
traditions representative of well-studied groups 
such as the Chewa of Malawi, the Dogon of Mali, 
the Akan in Ghana, the Amliara of Ethiopa, the 
Yoruba of Nigeria, the Ndebele of South Africa and 
the Kuba and Chokwe of Central Africa. Instead of 
the common "this-tribe-makes-that-style" method 
of assessing major an traditions in Africa, we will 
theorize the ways in which visual and conceptual 
references to "other" groups are often central to 
ideas about the "self' in African art. Local tradi- 
tions will be examined with a view to their refer- 
encing, absorption, and reworking of the concept 
of design and prestige from other cultures, Africa) 
and non-African, and what the art produced in 
these encounters tells us about historically specifi 
relations of power between men and women, "in-, 
siders" and "outsiders." Prerequisite: One 100- 
level course and one 200-level course in art his- 
tory in any subject, or permission of the instructoi 
{H/A} 4 credits 
John Peffer 
Offered Spring 2003 

ARH 254 Baroque Art (L) 

During this age of the consolidation of power - 
that of Roman Catholicism and European nation; 
states - explorations around the globe, investiga 
tions in science, and innovations in the concepts 
of artistic design led to an explosion of styles, 



Vrt 



95 



nnovative and often revolutionary, in art. Post 
Counter Reformation Italy and the reconsideration 
)f art theory and design at the Academy of the 
^arracci in Bologna beginning about 1580, the 
emergence of a new artistic interpretation brought 
ibout by Caravaggio and his followers — first in 
tome and then across Europe, and the subse- 
juent change in styles to meet various political 
ind regional needs will be examined through 
)ainting and sculpture in Italy: with such artists as 
tonibale and Ludovico Carracci, Caravaggio, Gian 
.orenzo Bernini, Pietro da Cortona, Guido Reni; 
7 rance: Simon Vouet, Poussin, Claude, and 
ieorges de La Tour; and Spain: El Greco, Ribera, 
/elazquez, and Zurbaran. Recommended back- 
ground: ARH 101 or 140. {H/A} 4 credits 
yaigFelton 
Offered Spring 2003 

\RH 288 Architectural Studies (C) 

Topic: The Taj Mahal 

["his course examines the Taj Mahal as a case 
itudy in the practice of architectural interpreta- 
ion. Mythologized and exoticized by European 
/iewers since the 17th century, the image of the 
raj has become an icon of perfection, luxury, and 
sensuality. This course will consider the original 
neaning(s) of the Taj Mahal within the broader 
:ontext of Mughal patronage, including not only 
irchitecture, but also the arts of book illustration, 
extiles, weaponry, gems, and ceremonial prac- 
ices. Lecture topics begin with predecessors to 
Mughal court culture in India and the broader 
Islamic world, and conclude by examining Victo- 
rian, colonial, and contemporary 7 responses to the 
raj Mahal. Prerequisite: One 100-level course and 
me 200-level course in art history in any subject, 
3r permission of the instructor. {H/A} 4 credits 
\nna Sloan 
Offered Fall 2002 

ARH 292 The Art and History of the Book (C) 

\ survey of the book — as vehicle for the transmis- 
sion of both text and image — from the manu- 
scripts of the middle ages to contemporary artists' 
books. The course will examine the principal 
techniques of book production — calligraphy, il- 
lustration, papermaking, typography, bookbind- 
ing — as well as various social and cultural aspects 
of book history; including questions of censorship, 



verbal and visual literacy, the role of the book 
trade, and the book as an agent of change. In ad- 
dition, there will be labs in printing on the 
handpress and bookbinding. Admission limited 
to 20 by permission of the instructor. {H/A} 
4 credits 

Martin Antonetti 
Offered Fall 2002 

GROUP IV 

ARH 260 Art Historical Studies (C) 

Topic: The Decorated Interior. 1860-1940 
In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centu- 
ries, artists, architects, and designers increasingly 
worked at breaking down the barriers between the 
arts. A single artist would design furniture, build- 
ings, posters, books, dinner ware, light fixtures, 
and fashion — all in an effort to create an en- 
semble: a "total work of art.'' This course will 
explore connections between art, architecture, 
and design, with an emphasis on interior design 
and the decorative arts. Coverage will include the 
Arts and Crafts Movement, Glasgow School, Art 
Nouveau, Vienna Workshops, the Maison Cubiste, 
the Omega Workshops, De Stijl, the German 
Werkbund, the Bauhaus, l'Esprit Nouveau, Art 
Deco and American streamlined design. Prerequi- 
site: One 100-level course and one 200-level 
course in art history in any subject, or permission 
of the instructor. {H/A} 4 credits 
Karen Koehler 
Offered Fall 2002 

Topic: Museums by Artists 
The experience of art does not take place in a 
vacuum: the museum, among other institutions, 
bestows value upon the objects inside it. In this 
class, we will examine an important body of art 
since the 1950s which has engaged critically with 
the architectural, institutional and discursive 
frameworks which are conditions for the experi- 
ence of art. We will examine works by artists in- 
cluding Michael Asher, Marcel Broodthaers, 
Daniel Buren, Andrea Fraser, Hans Haacke, Louise 
Lawler and Fred Wilson, in terms of the ways in 
which they reflect upon the contexts in which they 
appear. We will consider the current trend toward 
the spectacularization of museum architecture and 



96 



Art 



the museum's status as a mass medium, and look 
for future possibilities in the practice of institu- 
tional critique. Prerequisite: one 100-level course 
and one 200-level course in art history in any sub- 
ject, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment 
limited to 20. {H/A} 
Frazer Ward 
Offered Spring 2003 

ARH 261 The Art of Africa (L) 

An introduction to the ancient, traditional and 
contemporary aits of Africa. Attention will be 
given to the archaeological importance of rock 
art paintings found in such disparate areas as the 
Sahara and South Africa, achievements in the ar- 
chitectural and sculptural art in clay of the early 
people in Zimbabwe, and the aesthetic qualities 
of the terracotta and bronze sculptures of the Nok, 
Igbo-Ukwe, Ife and Benin cultures in West Africa. 
The study will also pursue a general socio-cultural 
survey of traditional arts of the major ethnic 
groups of Africa. Recommended background 
ARH 100 or 101. {H/A} 4 credits 
John Peffer 
Offered Spring 2003 

ARH 265 Arts in the United States after 
the Civil War (L) 

Art and architecture of the late nineteenth and 
early twentieth centuries. Exploration of the cul- 
tural legacy of the Civil War, the cosmopolitan arts 
of the Gilded Age, the development of early mod- 
ernism, and the expansive years during and after 
World War II. Recommended background: ARH 
101 or 140. {H/A} 4 credits 
John Davis 
Offered Spring 2003 

ARH 272 Nineteenth-Century European Art 
(L) 

An investigation of major artists and movements in 
nineteenth-century Europe from Neo-Classicism of 
Jacques Louis David to Post-Impressionism of 
Vincent Van Gogh and Paul Cezanne. Considered 
are the revolutionary trends in art as they relate to 
the academic establishment and how the artistic 
innovations reflect and redefine cultural, histori- 
cal, and societal developments. {H/A} 4 credits 
Jaroslaw Leshko 
Offered Spring 2003 



ARH 274 Nineteenth-Century European 
Capitals (L) 

"Reading" the major metropolises of Europe 
through their planning and buildings; special em- 
phasis on London, Paris, Berlin, and Vienna. Sub- 
ject matter will include the ideological, cultural, 
and technological components of urban develop- 
ment, the role of public and private institutions 
and diverse socio-economic and ethnic groups, 
and the contributions of artists and authors to the 
image and fabric of selected cities. Recommended 
background: ARH 101. {H/A} 
Karen Koehler 
Offered Fall 2002 

ARH 278 History of Photography (L) 

A survey of photography, photographers, and the 
literature of photography. Consideration of the 
formal, technical, historical, and social factors 
in the development and practice of photography 
since 1839- Recommended background: ARH 
101. {H/A} 4 credits 
Rebecca Senf 
Offered Fall 2002 

ARH 279 Contemporary Architecture and Art 

A survey of international visual culture since 1945, 
including painting, sculpture, photography, new 
media, conceptual art, performance art, and ar- 
chitecture. Recommended background: ARH 101. 
(E) {H/A} 4 credits 
Frazer Ward 
Offered Fall 2002 

Other 200-Level Courses 

For placement of the courses listed below into 
Groups I-IY, students should consult with the 
instructor and faculty- adviser. 

ARH 294 Art Historical Methods (C) 

An examination of the work of the major theorists) 
who have structured the discipline of art history. 
Recommended for junior and senior majors. Pre- 
requisites: ARH 101 and one 200-level art history 
course, or permission of the instructor. {H/A} 
4 credits 
Dana Leibsohn 
Offered Fall 2002 



97 



eminars 

miliars require both an oral presentation and a 
search paper and are limited to enrollments of 
!. Students wishing to enroll in a seminar should 
ive junior or senior standing. A 200-level course 
the same area is helpful but is not a required 
erequisite. 

RH 304 Studies in the Arts of Africa, 
:eania. and the Americas 

pic: Colonization and Visual Culture, Latin 
nericafrom 1520-1820 
)\v does conquest by foreigners change the ways 
at images, civic spaces and objects are created 
id used? What kind of hybrids does colonization 
oduce? And who makes colonial art: the con- 
lerors, or those who were vanquished? Focusing 
i Latin America — from the Caribbean to the 
ides — this seminar examines the intersection 
colonial history and visual culture. Among the 
pics we will consider: the mapping of new colo- 
al sites and cities; exchanges that brought indig- 
ious people and objects into contact (and con- 
ct) with those of Europe, Asia and Africa; differ- 
it ways that women and men relied upon images 
their daily life; relations between worshippers 
id the divine. Open to majors and non-majors 
th one 200-level course in art, literature, history, 
anthropology. {H/A} 4 credits 
ina Leibsohn 
Ffered Spring 2003 

RH 352 Studies in Art History 

pic: Tourism in the Greco-Roman World 
le fabled cities and sanctuaries of ancient Egypt, 
*eece, and Rome functioned as sites of tourism 
the ancient Mediterranean world. This course 
ill examine the cultural layering of what was to 
? seen at places like Athens, Thebes, Delphi, 
oy, Cumae, Rome, and the cities of the Nile, from 
e 5th century BCE through Roman times, consid- 
ing everything from famous buildings and tombs 
talking statues and sacred trees. We'll observe 
e traces tourists left of themselves in the form of 
■affiti and votive offerings and what they took 
)me with them as souvenirs. Contemporary theo- 
'tical models will inform the analysis of tourism 



and the continuing function of some of these 
places as sites for tourist consumption will also 
be discussed. 
{H/A} 4 credits 
Barbara Kellum 
Offered Spring 2003 

ARH 360 Studies in American Art 

Topic: Women and Art at the Turn of the 
Century 

An exploration of American women as producers 
and subjects of late nineteenth-century visual cul- 
ture. Our investigation will include the changing 
possibilities of artistic training and practice, the 
nature of gendered space, the "aestheticization" 
of turn-of-the-century culture, and the ideological 
underpinnings of such concepts as "allegory," 
"reverie," and "melancholy." Throughout we 
will be sensitive not only to the variety of roles 
assigned women by mainstream nineteenth-cen- 
tury American culture, but also to the roles women 
artists were able to define for themselves in an era 
of complex societal change. {H/A} 4 credits 
John Davis 
Offered Fall 2002 

ARH 374 Studies in 20th-century Art 

Topic: Pioneers of Abstraction 
Abstract art is a contribution to the history of the 
visual arts unique to the 20th century. A conscious 
effort to move beyond the boundaries of the repre- 
sentational world came to a head in various artis- 
tic centers in Europe in the first decades of the 
20th-century. The seminar will explore the artistic 
and societal forces, including science, which im- 
pacted this revolutionary development. Contribu- 
tions of Kandinsky, Delaunay, Malevich, Mondrian, 
and others will be considered. {H/A} 4 credits 
Jaroslaw Leshko 
Offered Spring 2003 

Cross-listed and 
Interdepartmental Courses 

Although the following courses are listed in other 
departments, student may receive credit for them 
toward the Art major and minor. 



98 



Ai 



AMS 302 The Material Culture of New 
England 1630-1860 

Not for seminar credit. 

EAS 270 Art of Korea 

HST 218 Thought and Art in China 

Special Studies 

ARH 400 Special Studies 

1 to 4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

ARH 408d Special Studies 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

B. STUDIO COURSES 

A fee for basic class materials is charged in all 
studio courses. The individual student is respon- 
sible for the purchase of any additional supplies 
she may require. The department reserves the 
right to retain examples of work done in studio 
courses. 

All studio courses require extensive work 
beyond the six scheduled class hours. 

Please note that all studio art courses have 
limited enrollments. 

Introductory Courses 

Studio courses at the 100 level are designed to 
accept all interested students with or without pre- 
vious art experience. Enrollment is limited to 18 
per section, unless otherwise indicated. Two 100- 
level courses are generally considered the prereq- 
uisites for 200 and 300-level courses, unless oth- 
erwise indicated in the course description. How- 
ever, the second 100-level course may be taken 
during the same semester as an upper-level 
course, with the permission of the instructor. 

ARS 161 Design Workshop I 

An introduction to visual experience through a 
study of the basic principles of design. {A} 
4 credits 
A. Lee Burns, Director 



A. Lee Burns, Chester Michalik, Meridel 

Rubenstein, Carl Caivano 

Offered both semesters each year 

ARS 162 Design with Computers 

An introduction to visual experience through a 
study of basic principles of design. All course 
work will be developed and completed using the 
functions of a computer graphics work station. 
Enrollment limited to 14. Permission of the in- 
structor required. {A} 4 credits 
Barbara Lattanzi, Susan Greenspan 
Offered both semesters each year 

ARS 163 Drawing I 

An introduction to visual experience through a 

study of the basic elements of drawing. {A} 

4 credits 

Dwight Pogue, Director 

Katherine Schneider, Roger Boy ce, Dwight 

Pogue, John Gibson, Gary Niswonger, Barry 

Moser 

Offered both semesters each year 

Intermediate Courses 

Middle-level courses are generally open to stu- 
dents who have completed two 100-level courses, 
unless stated otherwise. Students will be allowed 
to repeat 200 level and above courses, provided 
they work with a different instructor. 

ARS 262 Design Workshop II 

Problems in two- and three-dimensional design, , 
emphasizing structural awareness, techniques of 
fabrication, and the use of materials in the organi. 
zation of space. Prerequisite: 161 or permission , 
of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 16. {A} 
4 credits 
A. Lee Burns 
Offered Spring 2003 

ARS 263 Intermediate Digital Imaging 

This course will build working knowledge of mu 
timedia digital work through experience of web 
design and delivery; sound and animation soft- 
ware. Prerequisite: ARS 1 62. (E) {A} 4 credits 
Barbara Lattanzi 
Offered both semesters 2002-03 



99 



tRS 264 Drawing II 

advanced problems in drawing, including study of 
he human figure. Prerequisite: 163 or permission 
if the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 

I: credits 
athehne Schneider, Gary Niswonger 
Offered both semesters 2002-03 

kRS 266 Painting I 

) arious spatial and pictorial concepts are investi- 
I ated through the oil medium. Prerequisite: 163 
i r permission of the instnictor. Enrollment limited 
j) 15. {A} 4 credits 

"oger Boy ce John Gibson 

Offered both semesters each year 

tRS 267 Watercolor Painting 

i pecific characteristics of watercolor as a painting 
^ ledium are explored, with special attention given 
I ) die unique qualities that isolate it from other 
aiming materials. Prerequisites: 1 61, 163, and 
; 66 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment 

• mitedto 15. {A} 4 credits 

• usan Heideman 
iffered Fall 2002 

RS 269 Offset Printmaking I 

ltroduction to the printmaking technique of hand 
1 rawn lithography, photographic halftone lithogra- 
1 hy through Adobe Photoshop and linocut. May be 
1 ?peated once for credit. Prerequisites: 161, or 

ermission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 

2. {A} 4 credits 

Hvight Pogue 

ffered Fall 2002 

RS 270 Offset Monoprinting 

; rintmaking using the flat-bed offset press with 
i mphasis on color monoprinting. Prerequisites: 

61 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment 

mitedto 15. {A} 4 credits 

*wight Pogue 

ffered Spring 2003 

RS 272 Intaglio Techniques 

n n introduction to intaglio techniques, particularly 
ollagraph, drypoint, etching, and engraving. Pre- 
?quisites: 1 6 1, or 162, or 163, or permission of 
ie instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 
credits 



Gary Nisivonger 
Offered Fall 2002 

ARS 273 Sculpture I 

The human figure and other natural forms. Work 
in modeling and plaster casting. Prerequisites: 16 1 
and 163, or permission of the instructor. Enroll- 
ment limited to 16. {A} 4 credits 
A. Lee Burns 
Offered Fall 2002 

ARS 275 An Introduction to Printing 

Setting type and printing books and ephemera on 
the handpress. Examination and smdy of fine 
printing and rare books. Enrollment limited to 12. 
Admission by permission of the instructor. {A} 
4 credits 
Elliot Offner 
Offered Spring 2003 

ARS 276 Calligraphy and Lettering 

The art of writing and constructing letters and the 
use of calligraphy and lettering as design. Enroll- 
ment limited to 15. {A} 4 credits 
Elliot Offner 
Offered Fall 2002 

ARS 277 Woodcut 

The art of cutting images in relief on wood; print- 
ing from the woodblocks in black, white, and col- 
ors. Prerequisite: 163 or permission of the in- 
structor. Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 4 credits 
Elliot Offner 
Offered Fall 2002 

ARS 280 Introduction to Architecture, 
City Planning, and Landscape Design 

Preliminary instruction in drafting, perspective, 
and model building, followed by planning and 
design problems. Prerequisite: one art history 
course at the 100 level. Enrollment limited to 24. 
{A} 4 credits 
Gretchen Schneider 
Offered Fall 2002 

ARS 281 Introduction to Architecture, 
City Planning, and Landscape Design 

A continuation of 280. Prerequisite: 280. Enroll- 
ment limited to 24. {A} 4 credits 
Gretchen Schneider 
Offered Spring 2003 



100 



A3 



ARS 282 Photography I 

An introduction to visual experience through a 
study of the basic elements of photography as an 
expressive medium. Recommended: 1 61, or 163, 
or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited 
to 20 per section. {A} 4 credits 
Chester Michalik, Meridel Rubenstein 
Offered both semesters each year 

Advanced Courses 

Advanced courses are generally open to students 
who have completed one intermediate course, 
unless stated otherwise. 

ARS 361 Interactive Digital Multimedia 

This art studio course emphasizes individual 
projects and one collaborative project in com- 
puter-based interactive Multimedia production. 
Participants will extend their individual experi- 
mentation with time-based processes and develop- 
ment of media production skills (3D animation, 
video and audio production skills introduced in 
ARS 162, 263) - developed in the context of inter- 
active multimedia production for performance, 
installation, CD-ROM or Internet. Critical examina- 
tion and discussion of contemporary examples of 
new media art will augment this studio course. 
Prerequisites: ARS 162 and permission of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited to 14. (E) {A} 
4 credits 

Barbara Lattanzi 
Offered Spring 2003 

ARS 362 Painting II 

Painting from models, still-life, and landscape 
using varied techniques and conceptual frame- 
works. Prerequisites: 266 and permission of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 4 credits 
Roger Boy ce 
Offered Spring 2003 

ARS 364 Drawing III 

Advanced problems in drawing, including empha- 
sis on technique and conceptualization. The focus 
of this course will shift annually to reflect the tech- 
nical and ideational perspective of the faculty 
member teaching it. Prerequisites: ARS 163 and 
ARS 264. Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 4 credits 



Eliot Offner 
Offered Spring 2003 

ARS 369 Offset Printmaking II 

Advanced study in Printmaking. Emphasis on 
color printing in lithography, block printing and 
photo-printmaking. Prerequisite: 269 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. 
{A} 4 credits 
Dwight Pogue 
Offered Spring 2003 

ARS 372 Advanced Printmaking 

Advanced study in printmaking, with emphasis on 
etching. Prerequisite: 272, or permission of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 4 credits 
Gary Niswonger 
Offered Spring 2003 

ARS 374 Sculpture II 

Advanced problems in sculpture using bronze 
casting, welding, and various media. Prerequisite: 
273 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment 
limited to 12. {A} 4 credits 
A. Lee Burns 
Offered Spring 2003 

ARS 380 Architecture 

Further problems in design and planning, togethe 
with instruction in elementary construction. Pre- 
requisite: 281 or permission of the instructor. 
Enrollment limited to 12. {A} 4 credits 
Gretchen Schneider 
Offered Fall 2002 

ARS 381 Architecture 

A continuation of 380. Prerequisite: 281. {A} 4 

credits 

Gretchen Schneider 

Offered Spring 2003 

ARS 383 Photography II 

Advanced exploration of photographic techniqu< 

and visual ideas. Examination of the work of cor 

temporary artists and traditional masters within 

the medium. Prerequisites: 282 and permission 

of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 

4 credits 

Meridel Rubenstein 

Offered both semesters each year 



\r\ 



101 



\RS 390 Five College Drawing Seminar 

[liis course, limited to junior and senior art ma- 
ors from the five colleges, is based on the as- 
;umption that drawing is central to the study of art 
ind is an ideal way to investigate and challenge 
hat which is important to each student. Particular 
i mphasis will be placed on thematic development 
vithin student work. Sketch book, written self- 
inalysis, and participating in critique sessions will 
>e expected. Prerequisites: selection by faculty; 
unior and senior art majors, advanced-level abil- 
ty. Enrollment limited to 25, five students from 
•ach of the five colleges. (E) {A} 4 credits 
Coordinator, Roger Boyce 
o be arranged 

IRS 400 Special Studies 

formally by permission of the department, for 
unior and senior majors and for qualified juniors 
ind seniors from other departments. 1 to 4 credits 
)ffered both semesters each year 

IRS 408d Special Studies 

\ credits 

: ull year course; Offered each year 

dl students interested in a special studies in wood 
nust first complete a noncredit course in wood- 
vorking given first semester only. The course will 
ntroduce students to the proper use of various 
woodworking machines. Methods of designing will 
dso be included. 

Cross-listed and 

Interdepartmental Courses 

: LS 280 Introduction to Video Production 



honors 



"o-directors of the Honors Committee: 

vrt History: Dana Leibsohn; Studio Art: Gary 
tiswonger 

VRH 430d Thesis 
5 credits 
ull year course; Offered each year 



ARS 430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

Requirements: ARH 294 is recommended for art 
history majors. Honors candidates undertake a 
year-long project or thesis (430d) for 8 credits. 

Presentation: The candidate will present her work 
to the Honors Committee in an oral critique or 
defense during April. 



The Major 



Advisers: Roger Boyce, Brigitte Buettner, Lee 
Burns, John Davis, Craig Felton, John Gibson, Su- 
san Heideman, Caroline Houser, Barbara Kellum, 
Jaroslaw Leshko, Dana Leibsohn, Chester 
Michalik, John Moore, Gary Niswonger, Elliot 
Offner, Dwight Pogue, Marylin Rhie, Gretchen 
Schneider. 

Art History Adviser for Study Abroad: Brigitte 
Buettner. 

Art Studio Adviser for Study Abroad: Chester 
Michalik. 

There is one art major, which may be taken in one 
of three variations: Plan A (history of art) , Plan B 
(studio art), or Plan C (architecture). 



Areas of Study 



Courses in the history of art are divided into areas 
that reflect various general time periods. These 
divisions are: 

Group I: 200, 202, 204, 206, 208, 210, 212, 214, 
216 

Group II: 220, 222, 224, 226, 228, 230, 232, 234 

Group ffl: 240, 242, 244, 246, 250, 252, 254, 
255, 258 

Group IV: 260, 261, 263, 264, 265, 270, 272, 274, 
276, 278, 279, 280 



L 



102 



An 



Other courses not listed under Groups I— IV may 
be placed with the appropriate Group in consulta- 
tion with the instructor and academic adviser. 

No course counting toward the major may be 
taken for an S/U grade. 

Students entering Smith College in the Fall 2002 
semester (or after) are subject to the following 
requirements. All others have the option of follow- 
ing this set of requirements, or the one in effect 
when they arrived at the College or declared their 
major. 

PlanA, The History of Art 

Requirements: eleven courses, which will in- 
clude: 

1 . Two 100-level courses selected from two of the 
following categories: 

a: colloquia (ARH 101) 

b: non-western survey (ARH 120 or 130) 

c: western survey (ARH 140) 

2. one course in studio art 

3. seven additional history of art courses. Stu- 
dents must take at least one course in each of 
four areas of study (Groups I— IV). Normally, 
five of the history of art courses counted to- 
ward the major must be taken at Smith. No 
more than three of these seven may be in a 
single distribution group. 

4. one seminar in history of art (to be taken at 
Smith). Seminars do not count toward the dis- 
tribution requirement. 



Plan B, Studio Art 



Requirements: twelve courses, which will in- 
clude: 

1. ARS163 

2. Two 100-level courses selected from two of the Tll6 MillOrS 
following categories: 

a: colloquia (ARH 101) 

b: non-western survey (ARH 120 or 130) 

c: western survey (ARH 140) 

3. seven additional studio art courses. Majors are 
also encouraged to take one of the following 
design-related courses: ARS 16 1, ARS 162, and 
ARS262 

4. two additional history of art courses, at least 
one of which should be in Group I, II, or III. 



In addition, seniors will be required to install a 
show, which will normally occur in the spring 
semester. 

Plan C, Architecture 

Requirements: eleven courses, which will in- 
clude: 

1. Two 100-level courses selected from two of the 
following categories: 

a: colloquia (ARH 101) 

b: non-western survey (ARH 120 or 130) 

c: western survey (ARH 140) 

2. ARS 280 and 281 

3. ARS 162 or 163 

4. two additional semester courses in three-di- 
mensional design and architectural drafting 
(e.g., ARS 381, ARS 382, ARS 262), and/or 
their equivalents in other Five College institu- 
tions. 

5. four semester courses in history of art that 
focus on architectural monuments and urban 
environments: thus ARH 202, 204, 206, 208, 
212, 214, 216, 222, 224, 226, 228, 232, 234, 
246, 250, 263, 264, 265, 270, 274, 279, 285, 
288, 359- Students must take one course in at 
least three areas of study (Groups I— IV). Stu- 
dents are required to take at least one collo- 
quium or seminar in history of art, and to sub- 
mit either a research paper or a design 
project, which will ordinarily be done in con- 
junction with a 300-level course, but which 
may result from an Honors or Special Studies 
project. 

Students who contemplate attending a graduate 
program in architecture should take one year of 
physics and at least one semester of calculus. 



Plan 1, History of Art 

Designed for students who major in another de- 
partment, but wish to focus some of their attentk 
on the history- of art. With the assistance of their 
advisers, students may construct a minor as spe- 
cific or comprehensive as they desire within the 
skeletal structure of the requirements. 



103 



dvisers: Members of the history of art faculty Plan 3, Architecture and Urbanism 



equirements: six courses, which will include 
/o 100-level courses, three additional courses in 
.story of art (two of which must be in different 
•eas of study [Groups I— IV] ) ; and one seminar 
o be taken at Smith). 

Ian 2, Studio Art 

esigned for students who wish to focus some of 
eir attention on studio art although they are ma- 
rs in another department. With the assistance of 
it adviser, a student may construct a minor with 
imary emphasis on one area of studio art, or she 
ay design a more general minor which encom- 
isses several areas of studio art. 

dvisers: Members of the studio art faculty. 

equirements: 163 and five additional courses in 
udio art, of which at least three must be at the 
)0 level and at least one must be at the 300 level. 



Seeks to draw together the department's offerings 
in architectural history into a cohesive unit. 

Advisers: Brigitte Buettner, John Davis, Caroline 
Houser, Barbara Kellum, Dana Leibsohn, John 
Moore. 

Requirements: Five courses from the following: 
ARH 202, 204, 206, 208, 212, 214, 216, 222, 224, 
226, 228, 232, 234, 246, 250, 264, 265, 270, 

274, 279, 285, 288, 359. 

Plan 4, Graphic Arts 

Advisers: Gary Niswonger, Elliot Offner, Dwight 
Pogue. 

Graphic Arts: seeks to draw together the 
department's studio and history offerings in 
graphic arts into a cohesive unit. The require- 
ments are: (1) 163 (basis); (2) 292 Composition 
of Books; and (3) any four ARS from: 270, 272, 

275, 276, 277, 369, 372, of which one should be 
at the 300 level or a continuation of one medium. 



104 



Astronomy 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professor 

Suzan Edwards, Ph.D, Chair 

Assistant Professor 

James Lowenthal, Ph.D. 

Laboratory Instructor 

Meg Thacher 

Five College Education/Research Fellow 

Salman Hameed, M.S. 

Five College Faculty 

Tom R. Dermis, Ph.D. (Professor, Mount Holyoke 

College) 
George S. Greenstein, Ph.D. (Professor, Amherst 

College) 
William Michael Irvine, Ph.D. (Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 



Neal Katz (Assistant Professor, University of 

Massachusetts) 
John Kwan, Ph.D. (Professor, University of 

Massachusetts) 
F. Peter Schloerb, Ph.D., Chair (Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
Stephen E. Schneider, Ph.D. (Professor, University 

of Massachusetts) 
Ronald L. Snell, Ph.D. (Professor, University of 

Massachusetts) 
Eugene Tademaru, Ph.D. (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
Daniel Wang, Ph.D. (Professor, University of 

Massachusetts) 
Martin D. Weinberg, Ph.D. (Professor, University 

of Massachusetts) 
Judith S. Young, Ph.D. (Professor, University of 

Massachusetts) 
Min Yun, Ph.D. (Professor, University of 

Massachusetts) 






Students who are considering a major in as- 
tronomy should complete PHY 115 and 1 16 and 
the mathematics sequence up to Calculus II (MTH 
1 12) at their first opportunity. 

Good choices for first year astronomy courses 
are AST 1 1 1 and AST 113. Courses designed for 
non-science majors who would like to know 
something about the universe are AST 100, AST 
102, AST 103 and AST 220. 

The astronomy department is a collaborative 
Five College department. Courses designated FC 
(Five College) are taught jointly with Amherst Col- 
lege, Hampshire College. Mount Holyoke College, 
and the University of Massachusetts. Because of 
differences among the academic calendars of 
each school courses designated "FC" may begin 
earlier or later than other Smith courses. Stu- 
dents enrolled in any of these courses are advised 
to consult the Five College Astronomy office (5-45- 
219nt) for the time of the first class meeting. 



100 A Survey of the Universe 

Discover how the forces of nature shape our unde ' 
standing of the cosmos. Explore the origin, struc- 
ture, and evolution of the earth, moons and plane 
comets and asteroids, the sun and other stars, sta: 
clusters, the Milky 7 Way and other galaxies, cluster' 
of galaxies, and the universe as a whole. Designee 
for non-science majors. {N} 4 credits 
Suzan Edwards 
Offered Fall 2002 

102 Sky I: Time 

Explore the concept of time, with emphasis on t 
astronomical roots of clocks and calendars. Ob 
serve and measure the cyclical motions of the si , 
the moon, and the stars and understand phases 
the moon, lunar and solar eclipses, seasons. En 
rollment limited to 25 per section. {N} 3 credit 
Suzan Edwards. Meg Thacher 
Offered both semesters each year 






tronomy 



105 



D3 Sky II: Telescopes 

ew the sky with the telescopes of the McConnell 
ooftop Observatory, including the moon, the sun, 
e planets, nebulae and galaxies. Learn to use a 
lescope on your own, and find out about celes- 
il coordinates and time-keeping systems. Enroll- 
ent limited to 20 students per section. {N} 
credits 

mes Lowenthal Meg Thacher 
Ffered Fall 2002 

11 Introduction to Astronomy 

comprehensive introduction to the study of mod- 
•n astronomy, covering planets — their origins, 
•bits, interiors, surfaces, and atmospheres; 
ars — their formation, structure, and evolution; 
id the universe — its origin, large-scale structure, 
id ultimate destiny. This introductory course is 
signed for students who are comfortable with 
athematics. Prerequisite: MTH 102 or the 
mivalent. {N} 4 credits 
mes Lowenthal 
ffered Fall 2002 

13 Telescopes and Techniques 

beginning class in observational astronomy for 
udents who have taken or are currently taking 
HY 1 15 or the equivalent. Become proficient 
>ing the telescopes of the McConnell Rooftop 
bservatory to observe celestial objects, including 
te moon, the sun, the planets, stars, nebulae, and 
ilaxies. Learn celestial coordinate and time- 
eeping systems. Find out how telescopes and 
igital cameras work. Take digital images of celes- 
al objects and learn basic techniques of digital 
nage processing. Become familiar with measur- 
ig and classification techniques in observational 
tfronomy. Prerequisite: PHY 115, which may be 
Lken concurrently. Enrollment limited to 20 stu- 
ents. {N} 3 credits 
imes Lowenthal 
ffered Spring 2003 

20 FC20 Topics in Astronomy 

opicfor spring: Astronomy and Public Policy 
stronomical issues that impact our society will be 
xplored in a seminar format. Issues include the 
otential threat of collisions between the earth and 
ther solar system bodies and the search for extra- 
?rrestriai life. Prerequisite: one science course in 



any field. {H/N} 4 credits 
Suzan Edwards, Salman Hameed 
Offered Spring 2003 

223 FC23 Planetary Science 

An introductory course for physical science ma- 
jors. Topics include: planetary orbits, rotation and 
precession; gravitational and tidal interactions; 
interiors and atmospheres of the Jovian and ter- 
restrial planets; surfaces of the terrestrial planets 
and satellites; asteroids, comets, and planetary 
rings; origin and evolution of the planets. Prereq- 
uisites: one semester of calculus and one semester 
of a physical science. {N} 4 credits 
Darby Dyer at Mount Holyoke 
Offered Fall 2002 

225 FC25 Galactic and Extragalactic 
Astronomy 

The role of gravity in determining the mass of the 
universe will be explored in an interactive format 
making extensive use of computer simulations and 
independent projects. Offered in alternate years 
with 224. Prerequisites: PHY 115, MTH 111, plus 
one astronomy class. {N} 4 credits 
Suzan Edwards 
Offered Spring 2003 

226 FC26 Cosmology 

Cosmological models and the relationship be- 
tween models and observable parameters. Topics 
in current astronomy that bear upon cosmological 
problems, including background electromagnetic 
radiation, nucleosynthesis, dating methods, deter- 
minations of the mean density of the universe and 
the Hubble constant, and tests of gravitational 
theories. Discussion of the foundations of cosmol- 
ogy and its future as a science. Prerequisites: 
MTH 1 1 1 and one physical science course. {N} 
4 credits 

George Greenstein, at Amherst, Fall 2002 
Tom Dennis at Mount Holyoke, Spring 2003 
Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 

330 FC30a Seminar: Topics in Astrophysics 

Mars 

An interactive seminar, reading literature and ad- 
dressing unresolved questions about the Red 
Planet, such as: water on Mars, the Martian atmo- 



106 



Astronon 



sphere, surface composition and geomorphic fea- 
tures, life on Mars. Prerequisite: any intermediate 
level astronomy or geology course; AST 223 rec- 
ommended. {N} 4 credits 
Darby Dyar, at Mount Holyoke 
Offered Fall 2002 

Supernovae 

As the final, explosive stage of certain varieties of 
stars, supernovae synthesize and expel heavy ele- 
ments, heat the interstellar medium, trigger vigor- 
ous bursts of star formation, create neutron stars 
and sometimes black holes, and produce ener- 
getic cosmic rays. This course will concentrate on 
the physical processes that underlie supernova 
explosions as well as their use as primary and 
secondary extragalactic distance indicators. Pre- 
requisite: Three semesters of physics, and at least 
one prior astronomy course at the 200 level or 
above, or permission of the instructor. {N} 
4 credits 

Doug Leonard, at Hampshire 
Offered Spring 2003 

335 FC35 introduction to Astrophysics 

How do astronomers determine the nature and 
extent of the universe? Following the theme of the 
"Cosmic Distance Ladder," we explore how our 
understanding of astrophysics allows us to evalu- 
ate the size of the observable universe. We begin 
with direct distance determinations in the solar 
system and nearby stars. We then move on to spec- 
troscopic distances of stars; star counts and the 
structure of our Galaxy; Cepheid variables and the 
distances of galaxies; the Hubble Law and large 
scale structure in the universe; quasars and the 
Lyman-alpha forest. Prerequisites: at least one 
physics course and one astronomy course at the 
200-level or above. {N} 4 credits 
Steven Schneider at UMass 
Offered Fall 2002 

338 FC38 Techniques of Radio Astronomy 

Instrumentation and techniques of radio as- 
tronomy, and the nature of cosmic radio sources. 
Radio receiver and antenna theory. Radio flux, 
brightness temperature, and the transfer of radio 
radiation in cosmic sources. Effect of noise, sensi- 
tivity, bandwidth, and antenna efficiency. Tech- 
niques of beam switching, interferometry, and 



aperture synthesis. Basic types of radio astronom 
cal sources: ionized plasmas, masers, recombina 
tion and hyperfine transitions; nonthermal 
sources. Applications to the sun, interstellar 
clouds, and extragalactic objects. Prerequisite: 
PHY 214. {N} 4 credits 
Ron Snell at Umass 
Offered Spring 2003 

352 FC52 Astrophysics II: Galaxies 

The application of physics to the understanding o 
astrophysical phenomena. Physical processes in 
the gaseous interstellar medium: Photoionization 
in HII regions and planetary 7 nebulae; Shocks in 
supernova remnants and stellar jets; Energy bal- 
ance in molecular clouds. Dynamics of Stellar 
Systems: Star Clusters and the Viral Theorem; Gal 
axy rotation and the presence of Dark Matter in 
the Universe; Spiral Density Waves. Quasars and 
Active Galactic Nuclei; Synchroton Radiation; Ac- 
cretion Disks; Supermassive black holes. Prereq- 
uisites: two 200-level physics classes. {N} 4 credi 
James Lowenthal 
Offered Spring 2003 

400 Special Studies 

Admission by permission of the department. Op- 
portunities for theoretical and observational worl 
are available in cosmology, cosmogony, radio as- 
tronomy, planetary 7 atmospheres, relativistic astrc 
physics, laboratory astrophysics, gravitational 
theory, infrared balloon astronomy, stellar astro- 
physics, spectroscopy, and exobiology. 1 to 4 ere 
its 
Offered both semesters each year 



The Major 

Advisers: Suzan Edwards, James Lowenthal. 

The astronomy major is designed to provide a 
good foundation in modern science with a focus 
on astronomy. Taken alone, it is applicable for 
students who wish to apply scientific training in 
broad general context. If coupled with a major i 
physics, the astronomy major or minor provide* 
the foundation to pursue a career as a profes- 
sional astronomer. Advanced courses in math- 
ematics and a facility- in computer programming 
are strongly encouraged. 



istronomy 


107 


tequirements: 44 credits, including 1 1 1 or the 


Requirements: 24 credits, including 1 1 1 or the 


quivalent; 113; three astronomy courses at the 


equivalent; 224 or 225; and PHY 115. The remain- 


00 level, including 224 or 225; one astronomy 


ing courses may be selected from any astronomy 


ourse at the 300 level; PHY 1 15 and 1 16. In con- 


or physics offerings. 


ultation with her adviser, a student may select the 




emaining credits from 200 or higher-level 


Honors 


ourses in astronomy or from intermediate level 


ourses in related fields such as mathematics, 
hysics, geology, computer science, or the history 


Director: Suzan Edwards. 


r philosophy of science. 


430d Thesis 




8 credits 


4ajor in Astrophysics 


Full year course; Offered each year 


,dvisers: one astronomer and one physicist. 


432d Thesis 




12 credits 


he astrophysics major is designed to provide an 


Full year course; Offered each year 



Iternate path to pursue a career as a professional 
stronomer, rather than completing a double ma- 
>r in astronomy and physics. Central to this ap- 
roach is a strong physics background, coupled 
ith an immersion in important topics in modern 
strophysics. All students are advised to acquire a 
icility in computer programming. Especially well- 
repared students may enroll in graduate courses 
i the Five College Astronomy Department. 

equipments: 50 credits, including 9 physics 
asses (PHY 115, 116, 210, 211, 214, 220, 222, 
-lO. 348) and 3 upper level astronomy classes 
vST 335 or 352; two additional courses in As- 
onomy at the 200-level or higher) . 



Requirements: Same as for the major and 8 or 12 
thesis credits in the senior year. 



Graduate 



Seniors who are exceptionally well-prepared may 
elect to take graduate courses offered in the Five 
College Astronomy Department. Further informa- 
tion appears in the University of Massachusetts 
graduate catalogue. 



"he Minor 



dvisers: Suzan Edwards, James Lowenthal. 

he minor is designed to provide a practical intro- 
uction to modern astronomy. If combined with a 
lajor in another science or mathematics-related 
eld, such as geology, chemistry or computer 
:ience, it can provide a versatile scientific back- 
round, which would prepare a student for future 
ork as a scientist or technical specialist. Alterna- 
tely, the minor may be combined with a major in 
nonscientific field, such as history, philosophy, 
r education, for students who wish to apply their 
>tronomical backgrounds in a broader context, 
|iat could include history of science, scientific 
riting or editing, or science education. 



108 



Biochemistry 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



**' Stylianos P. Scordilis, Ph.D. (Biological 
Sciences) , Director 



Senior Lecturer 

**'LaleAkaBurk,Ph.D. 



Professor 

*' Steven Williams, Ph.D. (Biological Sciences) 



Laboratory Instructor 

Veronique Vouille, Ph.D. 



Associate Professor 

Y- David Bickar, Ph.D. (Chemistry) 

Assistant Professors 

* 2 Christine White-Ziegler, Ph.D. (Biological 

Sciences) 
Elizabeth Jamieson (Chemistry) 



Other Participating Faculty 

Borjana Mikic, Ph.D. (Engineering) 
Cristina Suarez, Ph.D. (Chemistry) 



Exemption from required introductory courses 
may be obtained on the basis of Advanced Place- 
ment or departmental examinations. 

Students are advised to complete all introductory 
courses as well as BIO 230, 231 and CHM 224 
before the junior year. 

252 Biochemistry I: Biochemical Structure 
and Function 

Structure and function of biological macromol- 
ecules: proteins and nucleic acids. Mechanisms of 
conformational change and cooperative activity; 
bioenergetics, enzymes, and regulation. Prerequi- 
sites: BIO 230/231 and CHM 223. Laboratory' 
(253) must be taken concurrently by biochemistry 
majors; optional for others. {N} 3 credits 
To be announced 
Offered Spring 2003 

253 Biochemistry I Laboratory 

Techniques of modern biochemistry: ultraviolet 
spectrophotometry and spectrofluorimetry, SDS 
polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Scatchard 
analysis, and a project lab on linked enzyme kinet- 
ics. Prerequisite: BIO 231. BCH 252 is a prerequi- 



site or must be taken concurrently. {N} 2 credits 
Veronique Vouille 
Offered Spring 2003 

CHM 335 Physical Chemistry of Biochemical 
Systems 

A course emphasizing physical chemistry of solu- 
tions. Topics covered include chemical thermody- 
namics, solution equilibria, enzyme kinetics, and 
structures of biopolymers. The laboratory focuses 
on experimental applications of physical-chemica 
principles to systems of biochemical importance. 
Prerequisites: CHM 224 or permission of the in- | 
structor, and MTH 112. {N} 4 credits 
Cristina Suarez 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

352 Biochemistry II: Biochemical Dynamics 

Chemical dynamics in living systems. Enzyme 
mechanisms, metabolism and its regulation, en- 
ergy production and utilization. Prerequisites: BC 
252 and CHM 224. Laboratory (353) must be 
taken concurrently by biochemistry majors; op- 
tional for others. {N} 3 credits 
Dai id Bickar and Elizabeth Jamieson 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 






ochemistry 



109 



S3 Biochemistry II Laboratory 

vestigations of biochemical systems using ex- 
l rimental techniques in current biochemical 
search. Emphasis is on independent experimen- 
. design and execution. BCH 352 is a prerequi- 
e or must be taken concurrently. {N} 2 credits 
ronique Vouille 
fered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

HM 357 Selected Topics in Biochemistry 

pic Pharmacology and Drug Design 
j introduction to the principles and methodology 
pharmacology, toxicology and drug design. The 
tarmacology of several drugs will be examined 
detail, and computational software used to ex- 
line drug binding and to assist in designing a 
w or modified drug. Some of the ethical and 
>al factors relating to drug design, manufacture 
d use will also be considered. Prerequisite: BCH 
2, or permission of the instructor. Offered in 
ernate years. Prerequisite: BCH 352, or permis- 
>n of the instructor. {N} 3 credits 
widBickar 
fered Fall 2002 



The Major 



Students planning graduate study in biochemistry 
are advised to include a year of calculus and a 
year of physics in their program of study. 

Requirements: BIO 1 1 1, 1 12, 230 and 231, 234 

and 235; CHM 111, 222 and 223, 224, and either 
332 or 335; BCH 252 and 253, 352 and 353- 

One elective from: BCH 380; BIO 345, 346, 348; 
CHM 328, 338, 347, 357. 

The S/U grading option is not allowed for courses 
counting toward the biochemistry major. 

Honors 

Director: David Bickar. 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 



)0 Seminar: Topics in Biochemistry 

pic: Cancer Cells Out of Control 
iown since the ancient Egyptians, cancers may 
considered a set of normal cellular processes 
;ne awry in various cell types. This seminar will 
• nsider chemical and radiation carcinogenesis, 
icogenesis, growth factor signaling pathways and 
|e role of hormones in cancers, as well as the 
thologies of the diseases. Prerequisite: BIO 230 
■ permission of the instructor. {N} 3 credits 
vlianos Scordilis 
fered Fall 2002 



432d Thesis 

12 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

Requirements: same as for the major, with the 
addition of a research project in the senior year, 
an examination in biochemistry, and an oral pre- 
sentation of the honors research. 



)0 Special Studies 

liable credit (1 to 5) as assigned 
fered both semesters each year 



)0d Special Studies 

riable credit (2 to 10) as assigned 
ill year course; Offered each year 



110 



Biological Sciences 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

* 2 Carl John Burk, Ph.D 

Stephen G. Tilley, Ph.D. 

Robert B. Merritt, Ph.D. 

Margaret E. Anderson, Ph.D. 

Richard F. Olivo, Ph.D. 

**' Stylianos P. Scordilis, Ph.D. 

Steven A. Williams, Ph.D. 

**' Paulette Peckol, Ph.D. 

**' Richard T. Briggs, Ph.D., Chair 

**' Virginia Hayssen, Ph.D. 

Michael Marcotrigiano, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 

Robert Dorit, Ph.D. 

Adjunct Associate Professors 

Thomas S. Litwin, Ph.D. 
Leslie R.Jaffe,M.D. 

Assistant Professors 

Dany Adams, Ph.D. 
Laura A. Katz, Ph.D. 



* 2 Christine White-Ziegler, Ph.D. 
Adam Hall, Ph.D. 
L. David Smith, Ph.D. 
Carolyn Wetzel, Ph.D. 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Gail E. Scordilis, Ph.D. 

Lecturers 

Betty A. McGuire, Ph.D. 
Esteban Monserrate, Ph.D. 

Senior Laboratory Instructor 

Graham R. Kent, M.Sc. 

Laboratory Instructors 

Esteban Monserrate, Ph.D. 
Gabrielle Immerman, B.A. 
Judith Wopereis, M.Sc. 

Research Associate 

Paul Wetzel, Ph.D. 






The following five courses are designed primarily 
for students not majoring in the biological sci- 
ences. For exceptions see requirements for the 
major. 

102 Human Genetics 

A study of human genetics at the level of mol- 
ecules, cells, individuals, and populations. Topics 
covered will include sex determination, genetic 
diseases, genetic counseling and screening, inher- 
itance of complex characters, and inbreeding. 
Laboratory sections will provide students with the 
opportunity to study their own genes and chromo- 
somes. Laboratories will meet in alternate weeks. 
{N} 4 credits 
Robert Merritt 
Offered Spring 2003 



104 Human Biology 

A study of select systems of the human body. For 
each system, we consider structure, function am 
development, and then apply this information to 
everyday issues related to health, disease, and 
society. {N} 4 credits 
Betty McGuire 
Offered Fall 2002 

202 Landscape Plants and Issues 

Survey of the plant materials used in the landsc; 
including interior, annual, perennial, woody 
plants, and turf. Identification, natural biology, 
culture, and use. Introduction to landscape mai 
tenance and design, regional planning, and gar n 
history. Lab and presentation, field trips, BIO 2( 



ological Sciences 



111 



list be taken concurrently. Enrollment limited to 
). {N} 3 credits 
ichael Marcotrigiano 
fered Fall 2002 

)3 Landscape Plants and Issues Laboratory 

entification, morphology and use of landscape 
ants including annuals, biennials, perennials, 
Dpicals, woody shrubs and trees, vines, and 
luatics. Bulb planting, pollinations. Design and 
anning labs and presentations. BIO 202 must be 
ken concurrendy. Enrollment limited to 40. {N} 
credit 

ibrielle Immerman 
ffered Fall 2002 

58 Conservation Biology Colloquium 

le application of ecological, genetic, and evolu- 
>nary knowledge to the global crisis of 
odiversity loss and environmental degradation. 
)pics include threats to biodiversity, the value of 
odiversity, and how populations, communities, 
id ecosystems can be managed sustainably. Case 
udies will integrate biology, management and 
)licy. (E) {N} 4 credits 
David Smith 
ffered Spring 2003 



udents who have attained scores of 4 or 5 on the 
ivanced Placement examination in biology may 
)ply that credit toward either 1 1 1 and/or 112. 
udents without AP credit but with a strong back- 
round should discuss their options with a depart- 
lental representative. The distribution require- 
lents for the major vary depending on whether 
udents have taken 1 1 1 and/or 112 (see The Ma- 
>r following the department course listings) . 

11 Molecules, Cells and Systems 

his course is an introduction to the study of life at 
le level of cells and organs. Specific topics in- 
lude: cell, organelle and membrane structure 
nd function, biomolecules, metabolism, bioener- 
etics, and the molecular basis of inheritance and 
lformation transfer; the organization and physiol- 
gy of selected plant and animal systems; homeo- 
tatic control mechanisms for regulation of the 



internal environment, including the role of hor- 
mones in homeostasis and reproduction; prin- 
ciples of neurophysiology. Investigative laboratory 
exercises explore basic concepts through observa- 
tion, self-designed experiments, and data collec- 
tion and analysis. {N} 4 credits 
Richard Briggs (Director), Graham Kent, 
Esteban Monserrate, Judith Wopereis 
Offered Fall 2002 

112 Exploring Biological Diversity 

The course examines the genetic, ecological and 
evolutionary processes that generate biodiversity. 
Specific topics include the origin of Me, 
organismal diversity, transmission genetics, human 
evolution, mass extinctions and ecosystem stability. 
Investigative laboratory exercises explore 
biodiversity and require students to design and 
test hypotheses in areas related to lecture topics. 
{N} 4 credits 
Laura Katz (Director) 

Robert Dorit, Graham Kent, Esteban Monserrate 
Offered Spring 2003 

204 Horticulture 

An overview of the field of horticulture. Students 
learn about plant structure, growth, and function. 
Methods for growing plants, identification and 
management of plant pests, plant propagation, 
plant nutrition, garden soils, and plant biotechnol- 
ogy. Class presentation. BIO 205 must be taken 
concurrently. Enrollment limited to 40. {N} 
3 credits. 

Michael Marcotrigiano 
Offered Spring 2003 

205 Horticulture Laboratory 

Practical lab experiences including an analysis of 
plant parts, seed sowing, identification of diseases 
and insect pests, plant propagation by cuttings and 
air layering, transplanting and soil testing. BIO 
204 must be taken concurrently. Enrollment lim- 
ited to 40. {N} 1 credit 
Gabrielle Immerman 
Offered Spring 2003 

230 Cell Biology 

The structure and function of eukaryotic cells. 
This course will examine contemporary topics in 
cellular biology: structural biology, organelle func- 



112 



Biological Scienct 



tion, membrane and endomembrane systems, 
cellular regulation, signaling mechanisms, motility, 
bioelectricity, communication and cellular ener- 
getics. Students may not elect to take both BIO 

230 and 236. Prerequisites: BIO 111, CHM 222. 
Laboratory (231) is optional. {N} 4 credits 
Stylianos Scordilis 

Offered Fall 2002 

231 Cell Biology Laboratory 

Inquiry-based laboratory using techniques such as 
spectrophotometry, enzyme kinetics, bright field, 
phase contrast and fluorescence light microscopy 
and scanning electron microscopy. There will be 
an emphasis on student-designed projects. Addi- 
tional prerequisite: BIO 230, which should be 
taken concurrently. {N} 1 credit 
Graham Kent 
Offered Fall 2002 

232 An Introduction to Genetics and 
Molecular Biology 

This course explores central concepts in transmis- 
sion, molecular and population genetics. Topics 
covered will include nuclear and cytoplasmic in- 
heritance; gene structure, DNA replication and 
gene expression; manipulation and analysis of 
nucleic acids; dynamics of genes in populations, 
mutation, natural selection and inbreeding. Dis- 
cussion sections will focus on analysis of complex 
problems in inheritance, molecular biology and 
gene dynamics. Prerequisites: BIO 111, BIO 112. 
Laboratory (233) is optional. {N} 4 credits 
Robert Merritt, Steven Williams 
Offered Fall 2002 

233 Genetics and Molecular Biology 
Laboratory 

A laboratory course designed to complement the 
lecture material in 232. Investigations include an 
extended, independent analysis of mutations in 
Drosphila, an introduction to basic techniques in 
molecular biology; and laboratory and computer 
experiments that explore genetic variation in natu- 
ral and laboratory 7 populations. Prerequisite: BIO 
232, which should be taken concurrently. {N} 
1 credit 

Robert Merritt, Steven Williams 
Offered Fall 2002 



234 Genes and Genomes 

An exploration of genes and genomes that stresse 
the connections between molecular biology, gene 
ics, cell biology and evolution. Topics will includ< 
DNA and RNA structure, recombinant DNA analy- 
sis, gene cloning, gene organization, gene expres 
sion, RNA processing, mobile genetic elements, 
gene expression and development, the molecular 
biology of cancer, the comparative analysis of 
whole genomes and the origin and evolution of 
genome structure and content. Prerequisites: BIC 
111, BIO 112. Laboratory 235 is optional. {N} 
4 credits 

Steven Williams, Robert Dorit 
Offered Spring 2003 

235 Genes and Genomes Laboratory 

A laboratory designed to complement the lecture 
material in 234. Laboratory and computer 
projects will investigate methods in molecular 
biology including recombinant DNA, gene clonin| 
and DNA sequencing as well as contemporary 
bioinformatics, data mining and the display and 
analysis of complex genome databases. Prerequi- 
site: BIO 234 which should be taken concurrent^ 
{N} 1 credit 
To be announced 
Offered Spring 2003 

236 Cell Physiology 

Survey of fundamental cell processes. Topics are 
presented in the context of cell evolution; covera? 
includes single celled organisms and multicelluls 
animals and plants. Lectures focus on cell struc- 
tures and the mechanisms underlying important 
cell functions, including transcription and transl; 
tion, energy transduction, motility, signaling, and 
reproduction. Students may not elect to take bot] 
BIO 230 and 236. Prerequisite: BIO 111 and CH 
1 1 1 or CHM 118. This course does not serve as I 
prerequisite for BCH 252. Laboratory 7 (237) is 
highly recommended but not required. {N} 
4 credits 
Dany Adams 
Offered Spring 2003 

237 Cell Physiology Laboratory 

This lab provides the opportunity to observe am 
manipulate cells so as to better understand the 
processes covered in lecture. To that end, stude > 



iok) 



gical Sciences 



113 



ill become facile with many types of light micros- 
fay. During the first half of the semester students 
ill be introduced to a variety' of cell types and 
dcroscopy techniques; the latter half is devoted to 
udent designed observations of single celled 
rganisms. Techniques include: bright held, 
irkfield, phase contrast, epifluorescence, confo- 
il and electron microscopy, video and time-lapse 
deo microscopy, and digital photography. Addi- 
3nal prerequisite: BIO 236 which should be 
ken concurrently. {N} 1 credit 
idith Wopereis, Dany Adams 
ffered Spring 2003 



244 Vertebrate Biology 

A review of the evolutionary origins, adaptations, 
and trends in the biology of vertebrates. Labora- 
tory (245) is optional. {N} 4 credits 
Betty McGnire 
Offered Spring 2003 

245 Vertebrate Biology Laboratory 

A largely anatomical exploration of the evolution- 
ary origins, adaptations, and trends in the biology 
of vertebrates. {N} 1 credit 
Betty McGuire 
Offered Spring 2003 



40 Plant Biology 

ant structure and function at the cellular, 
rganismal, and community levels; survey of the 
ant kingdom. Prerequisites: BIO 1 1 1 and BIO 
12. Laboratory (241) is optional. {N} 4 credits 
irolyn Wetzel 
ffered Fall 2002 

41 Plant Biology Laboratory 

[icroscopic analysis of plant structure; compara- 
Ve analysis of reproductive structures and life 
/cles; experimental manipulations of model plant 
stems. Additional prerequisite: BIO 240, which 
tould be taken concurrently. {N} 1 credit 
arolyn Wetzel 
ffered Fall 2002 

42 Invertebrate Zoology 

he majority of recognized animal species are 
ivertebrates. Their great diversity and form, func- 
on, and development are considered. A weekend 
eld trip to the coast may be scheduled. Prerequi- 
te: BIO 1 12. Laboratory (243) must be taken 
oncurrently. {N} 4 credits 
David Smith 
ffered Fall 2002 

43 Invertebrate Zoology Laboratory 

lamination of a wide variety of live invertebrates 
ith emphasis on the relationship between form 
nd function. Observations on aspects of inverte- 
rate structure, locomotion, feeding, and other 
ehaviors. BIO 242 must be taken concurrently. 
N} 1 credit 
David Smith 
Offered Fall 2002 



250 Plant Physiology 

Plants as members of our ecosystem; water 
economy; photosynthesis and metabolism; special 
emphasis on the study of growth and development 
as influenced by external and internal factors, 
survey of some pertinent basic and applied re- 
search. Prerequisites: BIO 1 1 1, BIO 1 12 and CHM 
1 1 1 or CHM 1 18. Laboratory (251) is optional. 
{N} 4 credits 
Carolyn Wetzel 
Offered Spring 2003 

251 Plant Physiology Laboratory 

Processes which are studied include plant mo- 
lecular biology, photosynthesis, photomorphogen- 
esis, growth, uptake of nutrients, water balance 
and transport, and the effects of hormones. Addi- 
tional prerequisite: BIO 250, which should be 
taken concurrently. {N} 1 credit 
Carolyn Wetzel 
Offered Spring 2003 

254 Microbiology: Bacteria and Viruses 

This course examines bacterial morphology, 
growth, biochemistry, genetics and methods of 
controlling bacterial activities. Emphasis is on 
bacterial physiology and the role of the prokary- 
otes in their natural habitats. The course also cov- 
ers viral life qdes and diseases caused by viruses. 
Prerequisites:' BIO 111 and CHM 111 or CHM 118. 
Laboratory (255) must be taken concurrently. {N} 
3 credits 

Christine White-Ziegler 
Offered Spring 2003 



114 



Biological Science 



255 Microbiology: Bacteria and Viruses 
Laboratory 

Experiments in this course explore the morphol- 
ogy, physiology, biochemistry, and genetics of bac- 
teria using a variety of bacterial genera. Methods 
of aseptic technique; isolation, identification, and 
growth of bacteria are learned. An individual 
project is completed at the end of the term. BIO 
254 must be taken concurrently. {N} 2 credits 
Esteban Monserrate 
Offered Spring 2003 

256 Animal Physiology 

Functions of animals, including humans, required 
for survival (movement, respiration, circulation, 
etc.); neural and hormonal regulation of these 
functions; and the adjustments made to challenges 
presented by specific environments. Prerequisites: 
BIO 1 1 1 and CHM 1 1 1 or CHM 1 18. Laboratory 
(257) is optional but strongly recommended. {N} 
4 credits 

Margaret Anderson 
Offered Fall 2002 

257 Animal Physiology Laboratory 

Experiments will demonstrate concepts presented 
in BIO 256 and illustrate techniques and data 
analysis used in the study of physiology. Additional 
prerequisite: BIO 256, which must be taken con- 
currently. {N} 1 credit 
Margaret Anderson 
Offered Fall 2002 

260 Principles of Ecology 

Theories and principles pertaining to population 
growth and regulation, interspecific competition, 
predation, the nature and organization of commu- 
nities, and the dynamics of ecosystems. Prerequi- 
site: BIO 112. Laboratory (261) is optional. A 
weekend field trip will be included for students 
not enrolled in laboratory. {N} 4 credits 
Stephen Tilley 
Offered Fall 2002 

261 Principles of Ecology Laboratory 

Introduction to ecological communities of south- 
ern New England, and to the investigation of eco- 
logical problems via field work and statistical 
analysis. Additional prerequisite: BIO 260, which 
should be taken concurrently {N} 1 credit 



Stephen Tilley 
Offered Fall 2002 

262 Evolutionary Biology: The Mechanisms 
of Evolutionary Change 

The processes of organic evolution are central to 
understanding the attributes and diversity of living 
things. This course deals with the mechanisms 
underlying change through time in the genetic 
structures of population change, the phenomenon 
of adaptation, the formation of species, and the 
reconstruction of evolutionary relationships. Top- 
ics include basic population genetics and molecu- 
lar evolution, the mechanics of natural selection, 
phylogenetic reconstruction, and human evolu- 
tion, Prerequisite: BIO 112. The course assumes 
familiarity with the basic principles of genetics. 
{N} 4 credits 
Stephen Tilley 
Offered Spring 2003 

264 Marine Ecology 

This course will initially focus on selected marine 
systems (e.g., shores, coral reefs, deep sea, etc.) 
in order to explore various natural factors that 
affect marine biodiversity. Our focus then will shif! 
to the role of human disturbances and their effect 
on these systems. Finally, we will briefly discuss 
some of the successful management strategies 
being implemented using various case studies. 
One of our goals is to familiarize you with some o 
the scientific concepts studied by marine ecology 
as a discipline. In addition, and as important, is 
our goal to help you develop vital skills such as ; 
effective oral and written communication, critical ■' 
thinking, and problem solving. We also emphasiz 
graphical representations and quantitative skills. 
First-year students must have permission of the ' 
instructor. Prerequisite: BIO 111 or GEO 108 or ' 
permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited t 
28. Laboratory (265) must be taken concurrentl' 
{N} 3 credits 

Paulette PeckoL Esteban Monserrate 
Offered Fall 2002 

I 

265 Marine Ecology Laboratory 

The laboratory applies concepts discussed in lee 
ture, focusing on class and individual research 
projects in both the field and laboratory. Addi- 
tional prerequisite: BIO 264, which should be 



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115 



- k en concurrently. Two required weekend field 
3S to the New England coast. {N} 2 credits 
ulette Peckol Esteban Monserrate 
fered Fall 2002 

6 Plant Systematics 

issical and modern approaches to the taxonomy 

higher plants, with emphasis on evolutionary 

nds and processes and principles of classifica- 

n. Laboratory (267) must be taken concur- 

ltly. {N} 3 credits 

m Burk 

fered Spring 2003 

7 Plant Systematics Laboratory 

id and laboratory' smdies of the identification 

d classification of higher plants, with emphasis 

the New England flora. BIO 266 must be taken 

ncurrently. {N} 1 credit 

m Burk 

fered Spring 2003 

18 Microbiology: Eukaryotes 

karyotes, cells with nuclei, have lived on the 
rth for at least two billion years. This course 
:uses on the bizarre and diverse world of micro- 
ti eukaryotes (protists), excluding the relatively 
:ent eukaryotes lineages of plants, animals and 
lgi. Emphasis is on the origin and diversification 
eukaryotes, and on the numerous diseases 
used by these microorganisms. Prerequisite: 
0112. Laboratory (269) must be taken concur- 
atly. {N} 4 credits 
ura Katz 
fered Fall 2002 

>9 Microbiology: Eukaryotes Laboratory 

e laboratory assignments allow students to ob- 
rve microbial eukaryotes and use microscopy 
d molecular techniques for experimentation 
th these organisms. Emphasis is on completion 
an independent project. A one-day field trip is 
heduled. BIO 268 must be taken concurrently. 
1} 1 credit 
ura Katz 
fered Fall 2002 

10 Colloquium on Molecular Medicine 

study of cells and their diseased states in hu- 
ans. The cellular, molecular, metabolic, and 



physiological bases of selected diseases will be 
analyzed. Topics will include gross and cellular 
pathology, inflammation, metabolic, musculoskel- 
etal and neurological disorders, as well as the 
clinical symptomology and therapeutic possibili- 
ties. Several topics will be given by pathologists at 
Baystate Medical Center. Prerequisites: BIO 230 
and 231. {N} 4 credits 
Stylianos Scordilis 
Offered Fall 2003 

325 Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience 

Molecular level structure-function relationships in 
the nervous system. Topics include: development 
of neurons, neuron-specific gene expression, mo- 
lecular mechanisms of neuronal plasticity (e.g. in 
learning and memory), molecular biology' of neu- 
rological disorders, and molecular neuropharma- 
cology. Prerequisites: BIO 230, BIO 234, or BIO 
236 and two semesters of chemistry. Laboratory 
(326) must be taken concurrently. Enrollment 
limited to 20. (E) {N} 4 credits 
Adam C. Hall 
Offered Spring 2003 

326 Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience 
Laboratory 

This laboratory initially uses tissue culture tech- 
niques to study the development of primary neu- 
rons in culture (e.g. extension of neurites and 
growth cones) . The rest of the laboratory involves 
the Xenopus oocyte expression system to study 
molecular structure-function. Oocytes (frog eggs) 
are injected with RNA/DNA encoding a variety of 
ion channels. The second half of the semester 
includes a lab project using the expression system 
to investigate channel characteristics or pharma- 
cology. BIO 325 must be taken concurrently. En- 
rollment limited to 20 (E) {N} 1 credit 
Adam C. Hall 
Offered Spring 2003 

330 Neurophysiology 

The function of nervous systems. Topics include 
electrical signals in neurons, synapses, the neural 
basis of form and color perception, and the gen- 
eration of behavioral patterns. Prerequisites: BIO 
230, 236 or 256. Laboratory (331) must be taken 
concurrendy. {N} 4 credits 
Richard Olivo 
Offered Spring 2003 



116 



Biological Scienc 



331 Neurophysiology Laboratory 

Electrophysiological recording of signals from 
neurons, including an independent project in the 
second half of the semester. BIO 330 must be 
taken concurrently. {N} 1 credit 
Richard Olivo 
Offered Spring 2003 

332 Histology 

A study of the microscopic structure of animal 
tissues, including their cellular composition, ori- 
gin, differentiation, function, and arrangement into 
organs. Additional prerequisite: BIO 230 or 236. 
Laboratory (333) is optional, but strongly recom- 
mended. Offered in alternate years. {N} 4 credits 
Richard Briggs 
Offered Spring 2003 

333 Histology Laboratory 

An introduction to microtechnique: the prepara- 
tion of tissue and organs for light microscopic 
examination, including fixation, embedding and 
sectioning as well as a number of different staining 
techniques and cytochemistry. Also includes the 
study of prepared material. Minimum enrollment: 
6 students. Additional prerequisite: BIO 332, 
which should be taken concurrently. Offered in 
alternate years. {N} 1 credit 
Richard Briggs 
Offered Spring 2003 

336 Introduction to Biological Fine Structure 

Introduction to the theory of electron microscopy 
and associated techniques, including electron 
optics, instrument design and operational param- 
eters, and specimen preparation; discussion of 
eukaryotic cell structure (supramolecular organi- 
zation) , and analysis and interpretation of micro- 
graphs. Admission by permission of the instructor. 
Additional prerequisite: BIO 230 or 236. Labora- 
tory (337) must be taken concurrently. Enroll- 
ment limited to 6. Offered in alternate years. {N} 
3 credits 
Richard Briggs 
Offered Spring 2004 

337 Introduction to Biological Fine Structure 
Laboratory 

Emphasis will be on the practice of basic tech- 
niques for electron microscopy, including diverse 



preparative procedures for biological material, tl 
operation of the scanning and transmission of 
electron microscopes, and associated photo- 
graphic processes. Independent projects are em 
phasized. BIO 336 must be taken concurrently. 
Offered in alternate years. {N} 2 credits 
Richard Briggs 
Offered Spring 2004 

340 Molecular Evolution 

This course will focus on methods and ap- 
proaches in the emerging field of molecular evol 
tion. Topics will include quantitative reconstruc- 
tion of selective and populational events shaping 
standing genetic variation; molecular mechanisn 
underlying mutation, recombination and gene 
conversion; comparative analysis of whole genor 
data sets; applications of molecular evolution in 
the fields of molecular medicine, drug design, ai 
disease and the use of molecular data for system 
atic, conservation and population biology. Prerec 
uisite: BIO 232, or 234, or 262 or permission of 
the instructor. {N} 4 credits 
Robert Dorit 
Offered Fall 2002 






342 Molecular Biology of Eukaryotic 
Systems 

The molecular biology of eukaryotes and their 
viruses. Topics will include eukaryotic chromo- 
some structure and organization, regulation of | 
gene expression, RNA processing, retroviruses, j 
transposable elements, gene rearrangement, 
methods for studying human genes, genome 
projects and whole genome analysis. Reading m 
signments will be from a textbook and the prim ' 
literature. Each student will present an in-class 
presentation and write a term paper on a topic 
selected in consultation with the instructor. Em- 
inent limited to 16. Additional prerequisite: BIC 
234. Laboratory (343) is optional. {N} 4 credit 
Steven Williams 
Offered Spring 2003 

343 Molecular Biology of Eukaryotic 
Systems Laboratory 

A laboratory course designed to complement tl 
lecture material in 342. Advanced techniques nd 
to study the molecular biology of eukaryotic sy 
terns will be learned in the context of a semesti 






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117 



ig project. These methods will include tech- 
ques for studying genomics and gene expres- 
m: cDNA library construction, DNA sequence 
alysis, Northern blot analysis, RT-PCR, bioinfor- 
itics, and others. Enrollment limited to 16. Addi- 
nal prerequisite: BIO 235 and 342, which 
ould be taken concurrently. {N} 1 credit 
wen Williams 
fered Spring 2003 

14 Immunology 

introduction to the immune system; molecular, 
Mar, and genetic bases of immunity to infec- 
us agents. Special topics include transplanta- 
n, allergy, immunodeficiencies, and immunopa- 
)logy. Additional prerequisite: BIO 230 or 236. 
commended: BIO 232 or 234 and 254/255. 
boratory (345) is optional. {N} 4 credits 
mstine White-Ziegler 
fered Fall 2002 

15 Immunology Laboratory 

imunological techniques used in diagnosis and 
research tools. Experimental exercises include 
mune cell population analysis, immuno- 
oresence, Western blotting, ELISA, agglutination 
actions, and neutralization of viral particles by 
tibodies. BIO 344 is a prerequisite or must be 
<en concurrentiy. Enrollment limited to 16 stu- 
nts. {N} 1 credit 
mstine White-Ziegler 
fered Fall 2002 

16 Developmental Biology 

.'velopmental Biology is the study of the amazing 
ocesses by which a fertilized egg becomes a 
ulticellular organism with thousands of different 
U types. Observations of these remarkable phe- 
>mena are presented in concert with the experi- 
ents underlying our current understanding of the 
'iitrol of these events. Emphasis is also placed on 
arning to design experiments to answer ques- 
>ns about cause and effect in biological systems, 
veloping or otherwise. Prerequisite: a course in 
olecular genetics or cell. Laboratory (347) is 
)tional. but recommended. {N} ^ credits 
my Adams 
ffered Fall 2002 



347 Developmental Biology Laboratory 

Observation, analysis, and manipulation of various 
phenomena in the development of various organ- 
isms using both classic and modern techniques. 
During the second half of the semester, students 
will design and carry out their own experiments. 
Lecture 346 must be taken concurrently. {N} 
1 credit 
Dany Adams 
Offered Fall 2002 

348 Molecular Physiology 

A study of regulation in cells at the molecular 
level, with emphasis on biochemical and biophysi- 
cal controls. Special topics: single molecule 
physiology signaling cascades, hormone action, 
membrane transport, and the application of basic 
science to molecular medicine. Additional prereq- 
uisites: BIO 230 and CHM 223. Offered in alter- 
nate years. {N} 4 credits 
Stylianos Scordilis 
Offered Fall 2004 

352 Animal Behavior 

Examination of the many approaches to the study 
of animal behavior. Topics include history of the 
field, physiological bases of behavior, and behav- 
ioral ecology and evolution. Additional prerequi- 
site: one of the following: BIO 242, 244, a statistics 
course or permission of the instructor. Laboratory 7 
(353) is optional. {N} 3 credits 
Betty McGuire 
Offered Fall 2002 

353 Animal Behavior Laboratory 

Research design and methodology for field and 
laboratory studies of animal behavior. Additional 
prerequisite, one of the following: BIO 242, 244, a 
statistics course or permission of the instructor. 
Enrollment limited to 15 students. {N} 2 credits 
Virginia Hayssen 
Offered Fall 2002 

356 Plant Ecology 

A study of plant communities and the relationships 
between plants and their environment. Additional 
prerequisite: a course in ecology or environmental 
science, or permission of the instructor. Laboratory 
(357) must be taken concurrently. {N} 3 credits 
John Burk 
Offered Fall 2002 



118 



Biological Scieno 



357 Plant Ecology Laboratory 

Field and laboratory investigations of the ecology 
of higher plants, with emphasis on New England 
plant communities and review of current litera- 
ture. BIO 356 must be taken concurrently. {N} 
1 credit 
John Burk 
Offered Fall 2002 

Cross-listed and 
Interdepartmental Courses 

BCH 252 Biochemistry I: Biochemical Struc- 
ture and Function 

Structure and function of biological macromol- 
ecules: proteins and nucleic acids. Mechanisms 
of conformational change and cooperative activity; 
bioenergetics, enzymes, and regulation. Prerequi- 
sites: BIO 230/231 and CHM 223. Laboratory 
(253) must be taken concurrently by biochemistry 
majors; optional for others. {N} 3 credits 
Stylianos Scordilis 
Offered Spring 2002, Spring 2003 

BCH 253 Biochemistry I Laboratory 

Techniques of modern biochemistry: ultraviolet 
spectrophotometry and spectrofluorimetry, SDS 
polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Scatchard 
analysis, and a project lab on linked enzyme kinet- 
ics. Prerequisite: BIO 231. BCH 252 is a prerequi- 
site or must be taken concurrently. {N} 2 credits 
Veronique Vouille 
Offered Spring 2002, Spring 2003 

ESS 215 Physiology of Exercise 

A study of body function during exercise. Empha- 
sis is on the physiological responses and adapta- 
tions that accompany single and repeated bouts of 
physical exercise. Prerequisite: BIO 104 or BIO 
1 1 1, or permission of the instructor. {N} 4 credits 
James Johnson 

EVS 300 Seminar in Environmental Science 

Examination of the impact of human populations 
on natural systems, the development of environ- 
mental problems, and the use of environmental 
science in policy creation. Case studies are used 
to explore the translation of scientific theory and 
research into policy and regulation. Topics in- 



clude: landscape ecology, natural system perturb; 
uon, conservation biology, sustainability, polluuoi 
environmental health risk assessment, natural 
resource economics, and the formulation of envi 
ronmental policy. There may be a one-day week- 
end field trip. Prerequisite: all courses completec 
or concurrent for the Environmental Sciences 
minor or by permission of the instructor. {S/N} 
4 credits 
L David Smith 
Offered Spring 2002, Spring 2003 

GEO 231 Invertebrate Paleontology and 
Paleoecology 

A study of the major groups of fossil invertebrate! 
including their phylogenetic relationships, paleo- 
ecology, and biostratigraphic importance. Specia 
topics include speciation, functional adaptations, 
paleoenvironments, consideration of the earliest 
forms of life, and the record of extinctions. Week 
end field trip to New York State. Prerequisite: GE< 
1 1 1, or GEO 108; open without prerequisite to 
majors in biological sciences. {N} 4 credits 
Allen Curran 

MTH 245 Introduction to Probability and 
Statistics 

An applications-oriented introduction to statistic 
inference: descriptive statistics; random variable: 
binomial and normal probability distributions; 
sampling distributions; point and interval esti- 
mates; standard parametric and nonparametric 
hypothesis tests; type I and type II test errors; co 
relation; and regression. A wide variety of applic 
tions from the sciences and social sciences will 
used. Classes meet for lecture/discussion and fo 
required laboratory. Laboratories emphasize coi 
puter analysis of real data and a laboratory secti . 
is offered for Biological Sciences majors. Prere(' 
uisite: MTH 1 1 1 , or MTH 1 53, or one year of hi 
school calculus, or permission of the instructor 
Lab sections limited to 15. 4 credits 
Katherine Halvorsen (Mathematics). Stephen 
Tiller 

PSY 311 Neuroanatomy 

A survey of the structural organization of the m i- 
malian brain and the behavioral changes assoc 
ated with brain damage. Laboratory covers re- 
search techniques in neuroanatomy. Prerequisi s: 



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119 



f 180 or PSY 2 1 1 , an introductory BIO course, 

permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited 

16. Laboratory sections limited to 8. {N} 

credits 

fan Bodnarenko 

Special Studies 

riable credit (1 to 5) as assigned 
fered both semesters each year 



2minars 



366 Topics in Cellular Biology 

Topic: Cancer: Cells Out of Control 
Known since the ancient Egyptians, cancers may 
be considered a set of normal cellular processes 
gone awry in various cell types. This seminar will 
consider chemical and radiation carcinogenesis, 
oncogenesis, growth factor signaling pathways and 
the role of hormones in cancers, as well as the 
pathologies of the diseases. Prerequisite: Bio 230 
or permission of the instructor. {N} 3 credits 
StylianosP. Scordilis 
Offered Fall 2002 



Topics in Molecular Biology 

Oic Emerging Infectious Diseases 
is course will examine the impact of infectious 
ieases on our society. New pathogens such as 
ons and the West Nile virus have recendy been 
•ntified, while existing pathogens have warranted 
ixeased investigation for multiple reasons, in- 
ning as causative agents of chronic disease and 
iicer and as agents of bioterrorism. Specific 
iphasis on the molecular basis of virulence in a 
iety of organisms will be addressed along with 
! diseases they cause and the public health mea- 
res taken to address these pathogens. Prerequi- 
t BIO 234 or BIO 254, Recommended: BIO 
4 {N} 3 credits 
ristine White-Ziegler 
fered Spring 2003 

4 Topics in Environmental Biology 

Oic: Biology and Geology of Coral Reefs — 
n Present, and Future 
ral reefs occupy a relatively small portion of the 
rth's surface, but their importance to the marine 
^system is great. This seminar will examine 
■ral reefs in terms of their geologic importance, [ J^g MjU OY 
p past and present, and their ecological inter- 
ims. Emphasis will be placed on the status of 
odern coral reefs worldwide, with a focus on 
feds of environmental and anthropogenic distur- 
inces (e.g., sedimentation, entrophication, over- 
fling). Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 
} 3 credits 
ulette Peckol 
fered Spring 2004 



368 Topics in Evolutionary Biology 

Topic: To be announced. {N} 3 credits 

Laura Katz 

Offered Spring 2003 

370 Topics in Microbiology 

Topic: Models, Assumptions and Reality 
in Microbial Biology 

An examination of the interface between existing 
models and representations of single species and 
community dynamics in microbial biology, and of 
the fit between these models and our increasing 
empirical knowledge in microbiology. The semi- 
nar will emphasize the quantitative underpinnings, 
simplifying assumptions and overall utility of mod- 
els of exponential and logistic growth, material 
and energy 7 flow, community dynam s, surface 
biofilms, plasmid and horizontal gene transfer and 
invasions, pathogenesis and resistance. Permission 
of the instructor required. {N} 4 credits 
Robert Dor it. Domenico Grasso (Engineering) 
Offered Fall 2002 



Advisers: Students should choose their advisers, 
according to their interests, from the department 
faculty, with the exception that the Chair of the 
Board of Pre-Health Advisers does not serve as a 
major adviser. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: John Burk. 



The following requirements for the major pertain 
to the Class of 2005 and beyond; current students 
should consult an adviser with questions about 
their requirements. 



120 



Biological Scien< 



The major in Biological Sciences is designed to 
provide 1 ) a strong basis for understanding bio- 
logical perspectives on various issues. 2) concep- 
tual breadth across several major disciplines in 
biology. 3) depth in one or more specialized fields 
in biology. 4) experience with modern tools and 
techniques of biological research, and 5) the op- 
portunity to personally experience the excitement 
and process of scientific investigation. Within this 
general framework, students can construct course 
programs that serve their individual interests and 
plans after graduation, while insuring that they 
acquire broad backgrounds in the biological sci- 
ences and associated fields such as the physical 
sciences, mathematics, and computer science. 

Prospective majors should take CHM 1 1 1 and BIO 
1 1 1 and 1 12 as early as possible. Note that one or 
two semesters of organic chemistry are prerequi- 
sites for a number of 300-level courses. 

The major requires 56 credits for courses taken in 
five major categories: 

1 . Fundamental courses ( 1 " credits) . 

2. Distribution courses (16-20 credits). 

3. Advanced courses (at least 7 credits). 

4. Laboratory courses (at least 4 credits, in the 
distribution, advanced and elective categories). 

5. Elective courses (additional courses to bring 
the total credits in the major to 56). 

Courses in the biological sciences taken at other 
insitutions may be counted toward the various 
categories with permission of the student's major 
adviser. 

Students with Advanced Placement credit in biol- 
ogy may elect to take additional distribution 
courses in lieu of 1 1 1 or/and 1 12. as explained 
below under "Options for majors with Advanced 
Placement credit." 



tribution fields. Laboratory courses are listed 
where they must be taken concurrently with the 
associated lecture course. 

Field A. Cell biology: 230. 236. 

Field B. Genetics: 232. 234. 

Field C. Physiology: 250. 254/255, 256. 

Field D. Organismal biology: 240. 242/243. 244 

268/269. 
Field E. Evolutionary biology: 262. 266/26". 
Field F. Ecology: 260, 264/265. 

The advanced course requirement: At least 
seven credits at the 300-level from courses lista 
or cross-listed in the department's offerings, wh 
must include a laboratory course, and which mi 
include no more than one seminar and no more 
than five credits of Honors research. A maximur 
of five credits of Honors research may be count< 
toward completion of the major. Special Studies 
(400) may not be counted toward completion o 
the advanced course requirement. 

The laboratory course requirement: The 

courses counted toward the distribution, ad- 
vanced, and elective requirements must include 
least four laboratory courses selected from 
courses listed or cross-listed in the Department 
offerings. With the adviser's permission, a seme 
ter of Special Studies (400) may count toward t 
requirement as a 200 level laboratory course, a 
a semester of Honors research (430. 43 1 . or 4 
may count toward the requirement at the 300 ■ 
level. 

Elective courses: Additional courses that brii 
the credits counted toward the major to a total 
56. Students who take one of the other courses 
designated for nonmajors (102. 104, 202/203 
258) before enrolling in 1 1 1 or 1 12 may coun ' 
as an elective course in the major Other electr 
courses may include any of the following: 



The fundamental course requirement: 111 and 
112. CHM 1 1 1 or 1 18. and a course in statistics 
(MTH 245 is strongly recommended for majors in 
the biological sciences). 

The distribution course requirement: Four of 
the following courses, one from each of four dis- 



• .Any course listed or cross-listed in the 
department's offerings, except those offere 
explicitly for non-majors that are taken afti 
111 or 112. 

• Up to four credits in Chemistry. Computer i- 
ence, Geology, Mathematics, or Physics. 



plogical Sciences 



121 



Up to five credits of Special Studies (400) or 
Honors research (430, 431, or 432). (A maxi- 
mum of five credits of Special Studies or Hon- 
i ors research may be counted toward comple- 
tion of the major.) 

dependent research: Independent research is 
•ongly encouraged but not required for the Ma- 
r in the Biological Sciences. Up to five credits of 
•ecial Studies (400) or Honors research (430, 
•I, or 432) may be counted toward completion 
the major, as described above under the labora- 
ry and elective requirements. 



Honors 



Directors: Christine White-Ziegler, Steven Will- 
iams. 

Basis: the same as that for the major. 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

431 Thesis 

8 credits 



)tions for majors with Advanced Placement 
edit or other forms of strong high school 
eparation in Biology. Majors who wish to use 
danced Placement credit or who have other 
rms of strong high school backgrounds in biol- 
y should elect one of the following options for 
or fundamental and distribution courses. 

1 1 1 and five distribution courses, including 
one each from distribution fields D, E and F. 

\ 112 and five distribution courses, including 
one each from distribution fields A, B and C. 

One course from each of the six distribution 
fields. 



432d Thesis 

12 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

Requirements: the same as for the major, and 8 or 
12 thesis credits in the senior year involving an 
individual investigation culminating in a written 
thesis and an oral presentation. 430d, 431, or 
43 2d may substitute for one 300-level course. 
Note that Special Studies credit is superseded by 
Honors credit. 

Marine Sciences 

See pp. 286-287. 



jdents who are considering these options should 
>nsult with the panel of biology advisers at fall 
gistration. 



'he Minor 



Jvisers: Major advisers also serve as advisers 
r the minor. 

le requirements for the minor in biological sci- 
ices comprise 24 credits from departmental 
ferings. These courses must include 111, 112, 
id one 300-level course. No more than one 
jiurse designed primarily for non-majors may be 
eluded. 



Neuroscience 

See pp. 305-306. 

Graduate 

Adviser: Stylianos Scordilis, Laura Katz. 



507 Seminar on Recent Advances and 
Current Problems in the Biological Sciences 

Students in this seminar discuss articles from the 
primary literature representing diverse fields of 
biology and present on their own research 
projects. Journal articles will be selected to coor- 
dinate with departmental colloquia. In alternate 
weeks, students will present on research goals, 



122 



Biological Scien< 



data collection and data analysis. 2 credits 
Members of the Department 
Offered Fall 2002 

510 Advanced Studies in Molecular Biology 

3 to 5 credits 

Members of the Department 

Offered both semesters each year 

520 Advanced Studies in Botany 

3 to 5 credits 

Members of the Department 

Offered both semesters each year 

530 Advanced Studies in Microbiology 

3 to 5 credits 

Members of the Department 

Offered both semesters each year 

540 Advanced Studies in Zoology 

3 to 5 credits 

Members of the Department 

Offered both semesters each year 

550 Advanced Studies in Environmental 
Biology 

3 to 5 credits 

Members of the Department 

Offered both semesters each year 

590d Research and Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

Preparation for graduate study in the 
biological sciences. 

Graduate programs that grant masters and doc- 
toral degrees in biology vary in their admission 
requirements, which may include at least one year 



each of mathematics (preferably including statis 
tics) , physics, and organic chemistry. Many pro- 
grams stress both broad preparation across the 
biological sciences and a strong background in 
specific area. Many institutions require scores o 
the Graduate Record Examination, which emphs 
size a broad foundation in biology as well as qui 
titative and verbal skills. Students contemplating 
graduate study should review the requirements i 
particular programs as early as possible in the 
course of their studies and seek advice from me 
bers of the department. 

Prehealth Professional 
Programs 

Students may prepare for health profession 
schools by majoring in any area, as long as they 
include in their program courses that meet the 
minimum requirements for entrance. For most 
schools, these are one year each of inorganic 
chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, biology 
(all with laboratories) and English. Other cours 
often recommended include biochemistry, math 
ematics through calculus, and social or behavio 
science. Because health profession schools diffe 
in the details of their requirements, students 
should confer with a Prehealth adviser as early ; 
possible about specific requirements. 

Information may be obtained from the Career D 
velopment Office or from Margaret E. Anderson 
Chair of the Board of Pre-Health Advisers. 



123 



Chemistry 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



ofessor Shizuka Hsieh, Ph.D. 

)bert G. Linck, Ph.D., Acting Chair, Spring and Maureen Fagan, Ph.D. 
112003 

Senior Lecturer 
>sociate Professor * 2 Lale Aka Burk, Ph.D. 

*' David Bickar, Ph.D., Chair 

Senior Laboratory Instructor and Laboratory 
sistant Professors Supervisor 

istina Suarez, Ph.D. Virginia White, M.A. 

Kate Queeney, Ph.D. 

2 Kevin Shea, Ph.D. Laboratory Instructors 

izabeth Jamieson, Ph.D. Maria Bickar, M.S. 

Rebecca Thomas, Ph.D. 



jdents who are planning to major in chemistry 
ould consult with a member of the department 
rly in their college careers. They should elect 
meral Chemistry as first-year students and are 
[[vised to complete MTH 1 12 or MTH 1 14 and 
'lY 1 1 5 and 1 16 as early as possible. 
All intermediate courses require as a prerequi- 
e a semester of General Chemistry or an Ad- 
nced Placement score of 4 or 5. 

)0 The World Around Us 

course dealing with the materials and the trans- 
rmations central to our daily lives. Principal 
pics: chemicals essential to our existence; chem- 
ry and the arts; chemistry and the environment. 
) prerequisite. Not open to students with Ad- 
nced Placement or previous college credit in 
lemistry. Three hours of lecture, discussion, and 
>monstrations. {N} 4 credits 
izabeth Jamieson, Spring 2003 
vid Bickar, Spring 2004 
ffered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

08 Environmental Chemistry 

i introduction to environmental chemistry, apply- 
g chemical concepts to topics ^uch as acid rain, 
e greenhouse effect, the ozone layer, smog, 



pesticides, and the nitrogen cycle. Chemical con- 
cepts will be developed as needed. {N} 4 credits 
Shizuka Hsieh 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

111 Chemistry I: General Chemistry 

An introductory course dealing with atomic and 
molecular structure and properties, and with 
chemical reactions. The laboratory includes tech- 
niques of chemical synthesis and analysis. Enroll- 
ment limited to 60 per lecture section, 16 per lab 
section. {N} 5 credits 
Maureen Fagan, Robert Linck, Elizabeth 
Jamieson, Virginia White, Fall 2002 
Members of the Department, Fall 2003 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

118 Advanced General Chemistry 

This course is designed for students with a very 
strong background in chemistry. The elementary- 
theories of stoichiometry, atomic structure, bond- 
ing, structure, energetics and reactions will be 
quickly reviewed. The major portions of the 
course will involve a detailed analysis of atomic 
theory and bonding from an orbital concept, an 
examination of the concepts behind thermody- 
namic arguments in chemical systems, and an 



124 



Chemisti 



investigation of chemical reactions and kinetics. 
Examples will include concepts from materials 
science (solid state chemistry, polymers), and the 
chemistry of the atmosphere. Project based labo- 
ratory. The course is designed to prepare students 
for CHM 222/223 as well as replace both CHM 
1 1 1 and CHM 224. A student who passes 1 18 can- 
not take either 1 1 1 or 224. Enrollment limited to 
18. {N} 5 credits 
Robert Linck Maria Bickar 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

222 Chemistry II: Organic Chemistry 

An introduction to the theory and practice of or- 
ganic chemistry. Structure, nomenclature, and 
physical and chemical properties of organic com- 
pounds with an emphasis on alkanes, alkyl ha- 
lides, alkenes, alkynes, and cycloalkanes. Spectro- 
scopic methods of analysis focusing on infrared 
and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. 
Prerequisite: 111. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab 
section. {N} 5 credits 
Kevin Shea, Robert Linck Lale Burk, 
Spring 2003 

Members of the Department, Spring 2004 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

223 Chemistry III: Organic Chemistry 

The chemistry of alcohols, ethers, amines, alde- 
hydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and functional 
derivatives of carboxylic acids, aromatic com- 
pounds and multifunctional compounds. Intro- 
duction to retrosynthetic analysis and multistep 
synthetic planning. Prerequisite: 222 and success- 
ful completion of the 222 lab. Enrollment limited 
to 16 per lab section. {N} 5 credits 
Kevin Shea, Lale Burk Fall 2002 
Members of the Department, Fall 2003 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

224 Chemistry IV: Bonding, Structure, 
and Energetics 

An introduction to electronic structure, chemical 
kinetics and mechanisms, and thermodynamics. 
Introductory quantum mechanics opens the way to 
molecular orbital theory and coordination chem- 
istry of transition metals. Topics in chemical ther- 
modynamics include equilibria for acids and 
bases, analyses of entropy and free energy, and 
electrochemistry. Prerequisite: 223 or permission 



of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 18 per lat 
section. {N} 5 credits 

Cristina Suarez, Virginia White, Spring 2003 
Members of the Department, Spring 2004 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

226 Synthesis 

Synthetic techniques and experimental design in 
the context of multistep synthesis. The literature i 
chemistry, methods of purification and character- 
ization. Recommended especially for sophomore 
Prerequisite: 223. {N} 3 credits 
Maureen Fagan, Rebecca Thomas, Spring 2003 
David Bickar, Rebecca Thomas, Spring 2004 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

321 Organic Synthesis 

An examination of modern methods of organic 
synthesis and approaches to the synthesis of com 
plex organic compounds with a focus on the cur- 
rent literature. Prerequisite: 223. Offered in alter 
nate years. {N} 4 credits 
Kevin Shea 
Offered Spring 2003 

328 Bio-Organic Chemistry 

The function, biosynthesis, and structure elucida 
tion of the molecules of nature with emphasis on 
terpenoids from plant essential oils, steroids, alk 
loids, nature's pigments, molecular messengers, 
and defense chemicals. Prerequisite: 223. Offere 
in alternate years. {N} 3 credits 
Lale Burk 
Offered Spring 2004 

331 Physical Chemistry I 

Quantum chemistry: the electronic structure of 
atoms and molecules, with applications in spec- 
troscopy. An introduction to statistical mechanic 
links the quantum world to macroscopic prope: 
ties. Prerequisites: 224 and MTH 1 12 or MTH ; 
114. MTH 212 or PHY 210, and PHY 115 are 
strongly recommended. {N} 4 credits 
Shizuka Hsieh 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

332 Physical Chemistry II 

Thermodynamics and kinetics: will the content >f 
this flask react, and if so, how fast? Properties 1 it 
govern the chemical and physical behavior of 



emistry 



125 



icroscopic collections of atoms and molecules 

ases, liquids, solids and mixtures of the above) . 

■requisite: 331- {N} 5 credits 

ieQueeney, Spring 2003 

istina Suarez, Spring 2004 

fered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

15 Physical Chemistry of Biochemical 
(Stems 

:ourse emphasizing physical chemistry of solu- 
ns. Topics covered include chemical thermody- 
mics, solution equilibria, enzyme kinetics, and 
i >chemical transport processes. The laboratory 
!;uses on experimental applications of physical- 
emical principles to systems of biochemical 
iportance. Prerequisites: 224 or permission of 
E instructor, and MTH 112. {N} 4 credits 
istina Suarez 
fered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

17 Materials Chemistry 

■is course provides an introduction to the inter- 
pplinary field of materials from a chemist's 
I'wpoint. Students will learn fundamentals of 
slid state chemistry as well as techniques used to 
! lthesize and characterize materials (including 
i/stalline and amorphous solids as well as thin 
Ins). These concepts will be applied to current 
|)ics in materials chemistry, culminating in a 
I al paper and oral presentation on a topic of 
*ch student's choice. Prerequisite: CHM 224 or 
(uivalent or permission of the instructor. Offered 
i alternate years. {N} 4 credits 
deQueeney 
> fered Spring 2003 



347 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

A laboratory-oriented course involving spectro- 
scopic, chromatographic, and electrochemical 
methods for the quantitation, identification, and 
separation of species. Critical evaluation of data 
and error analysis. Prerequisite: 224 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. {N/M} 5 credits 
Kate Queeney, Virginia White, Fall 2002 
Robert Linck, Virginia White, Fall 2003 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

357 Selected Topics in Biochemistry 

Topic: Pharmacology and Drug Design 
An introduction to the principles and methodology 
of pharmacology, toxicology, and drug design. The 
pharmacology of several drugs will be examined 
in detail, and computational software used to ex- 
amine drug binding and to assist in designing a 
new or modified drug. Some of the ethical and 
legal factors relating to drug design, manufacture, 
and use will also be considered. Prerequisite: BCH 
352, or permission of the instructor. Offered in 
alternate years. {N} 3 credits 
David Bickar 
Offered Fall 2002 

363 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

Topics in inorganic chemistry. Application of 
group theory to coordination compounds, mo- 
lecular orbital theory of main group compounds, 
and organometallic compounds. Prerequisite: 
331. {N} 4 credits 
Robert Linck, Spring 2003 
Elizabeth Jamieson, Spring 2004 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 



18 Molecular Spectroscopy 

' is course is designed to provide an understand- 
fe of mathematical formulations, electronic ele- 
cts and experimentally determined parameters 
lated to the study of molecular systems. We will 
:us on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance as the spec- 
)scopic technique of choice in chemistry and 
3logy. Prerequisites: A knowledge of NMR spec- 
i)scopy at the basic level covered in CHM 222 
d 223. Offered in alternate years. {N} 4 credits 
•istina Suarez 
fered Fall 2003 



395 Advanced Chemistry 

A course in winch chemical systems, without re- 
gard to boundaries of subdisciplines, are treated 
by and unified with an orbital model. Topics in- 
clude HMO analysis, perturbation theory, aroma- 
ticity, hypervalence, frontier orbitals, fragment 
analysis, Walsh's rules, Jahn-Teller phenomena, 
cycloaddition, clusters, solid state, and reactivity. 
Prerequisite: 331- Offered in alternate years. {N} 
4 credits 
Robert Linck 
Offered Spring 2004 



126 



Chemist 



Cross-listed and 
Interdepartmental Courses 

BCH 352 Biochemistry II: Biochemical Dy- 
namics 

Chemical dynamics in living systems. Enzyme 
mechanisms, metabolism and its regulation, en- 
ergy production and utilization. Prerequisites: BCH 
252 and CHM 224. Laboratory (BCH 353) must be 
taken concurrently by biochemistry majors; op- 
tional for others. {N} 3 credits 
David Bickar, Elizabeth Jamieson, Fall 2002 
Elizabeth Jamiesotu Fall 2003 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

BCH 353 Biochemistry II Laboratory 

Investigations of biochemical systems using ex- 
perimental techniques in current biochemical 
research. Emphasis is on independent experimen- 
tal design and execution. BCH 352 is a prerequi- 
site or must be taken concurrently. {N} 2 credits 
Ye von i que Void He 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

400 Special Studies 

1 to 4 credits as assigned 

Offered both semesters each year 



The Major 



Advisers: Members of the Department. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Virginia White. 

Students planning graduate study in chemistry are 
advised to include PHY 115 and 116 and MTH 212 
or 2 1 1 in their programs of study. A major pro- 
gram that includes these courses, one semester of 
biochemistry and additional laboratory experience 
in the form of either (a) two semesters of re- 
search (400, 430. or 432). or (b) one semester 
of research and one elective course with labora- 
tory or (c) three elective courses with laboratory- 
meets the requirements of the American Chemical 
Society for eligibility for professional standing. 



Required courses: 111, 222, 223, 224, 226, 33L 
332, 34 7 , 363, and a further 6 credits in chemis- 
try, above the 200 level. Four of the six credits m 
be counted from the research courses 400, 430, 
or 432, or from BCH 252, BCH 352, GEO 301. 
PHI 7 332, PHY 340, or PHY 348. Courses fulfillini 
the major requirements may not be taken with th 
S/L" option. 

The Minor 

Advisers: Members of the Department. 

The specified required courses constitute a four- 
semester introduction to chemistry. The semestei 
are sequential, giving a structured development c 
chemical concepts and a progressive presentatioi 
of chemical information. Completion of the mino 
with at least one additional course at the interme 
diate or advanced level affords the opportunity to 
explore a particular area in greater depth. 

Required courses: 23 credits in chemistry that 
must include 111, 222. 223, and 224. Special 
Studies 400 normally may not be used to meet th 
requirements of the minor. Courses fulfilling the 
minor requirement may not be taken with the S/l 
option. 

Honors 

Director: Kate Queeney. 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

432d Thesis 

12 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

.An individual investigation pursued throughout 
senior year. 

Requirements: the same as those for the major. 
with the addition of a thesis and an oral examirj 
tion in the area of the thesis. 



127 



lassical Languages and Literatures 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are 


generally appointed for a limited term. 


rofessors 


Associate Professors 


stina Winston Gregory, Ph.D. 


t 1 Nancy J. Shumate, Ph.D 


Thalia Alexandra Pandiri, Ph.D. (Classical 


Scott A. Bradbury, Ph.D, Chair 


Languages and Literatures and Comparative 




Literature) 


Visiting Assistant Professor 




Jessamyn Lewis, Ph.D. 




Lecturer 




Maureen Ryan, Ph.D. 


ajors are offered in Greek, Latin, classics, and 


GRK 213 Homer, Iliad or Odyssey 


assical studies. Qualified students in these ma- 


Prerequisite: 212 or permission of the instructor. 


rs have the opportunity of a semester's study at 


{L/F} 4 credits 


e Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in 


Jessamyn Lewis 


)me. 


Offered Spring 2003 


Students planning to major in classics are ad- 




>ed to take relevant courses in other depart- 


GRK 310 Advanced Readings in Greek 


ents such as art, English, history, philosophy, 


Literature 


id modem foreign languages. 


Authors read in GRK 310 vary from year to year, 


Students who receive scores of 4 and 5 on the 


but they are generally chosen from a list including 


lvanced Placement test in Virgil may not apply 


Plato, Homer, Aristophanes, lyric poets, tragedi- 


at credit toward the degree if they complete LAT 


ans, historians and orators, depending on the in- 


3 for credit. 


terests and needs of the students. GRK 310 may be 


Credit is not granted for the first semester only 


repeated for credit, provided that the topic is not 


an introductory' language course. 


the same. Prerequisite: GRK 213 or permission of 




the instructor. {L/F} 



rreek 



RK lOOd Elementary Greek 

year-long course that will include both the fun- 

imentals of grammar and, in the second semes- 

r, selected readings. May not be taken S/U. {F} 

jCredits 

ott Bradbury 

ill year course; Offered each year 

jKK 212 Attic Prose and Drama 

erequisite: lOOd. {L/F} 4 credits 
stina Gregory 
Pfered Fall 2002 



Topic: Euripides and Thucydides: Athens 

Destroys Itself 

A study of how a contemporary tragedian and a 

contemporary historian viewed Athens' loss of its 

empire in the Peloponnesian War. Prerequisite: 

GRK 213 or permission of the instructor. {L/F} 

4 credits 

Just in a Gregoiy 

Offered Fall 2002 

GRK 404 Special Studies 

Admission by permission of the department, for 
majors and honors students who have had four 
advanced courses in Greek. 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 



128 



Classical Languages and Literatim 



Graduate 



GRK 580 Studies in Greek Literature 

This will ordinarily be an enriched version of the 
300-level course currently offered. 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 

Adviser for Graduate Study: Justina Gregory. 

See also REL 287: Greek Religious Texts. 



Latin 



LAT lOOd Elementary Latin 

Fundamentals of grammar, with selected readings 

from Latin authors in the second semester. {F} 

8 credits 

Maureen Ryan, Jessamyn Lewis 

Full year course; Offered each year 

LAT 212 Introduction to Latin Prose and 
Poetry 

Practice and improvement of reading skills 
through the study of a selection of texts in prose 
and verse. Systematic review of fundamentals of 
grammar. Prerequisite: LAT lOOd, or the equiva- 
lent. {L/F} 4 credits 
Maureen Ryan 
Offered Fall 2002 

LAT 213 Introduction to \l\xg\VsAeneid 

Prerequisite: 212 or permission of the instructor. 
{L/F} 4 credits 
Scott Bradbury 
Offered Spring 2003 

LAT 330 Advanced Readings in Latin 
Literature 

Authors read in LAT 330 vary from year to year, 
but they are generally chosen from a list including 
epic and lyric poets, historians, orators, comedi- 
ans and novelists, depending on the interests and 
needs of students. LAT 330 may be repeated for 
credit, provided that the topic is not the same. 
Prerequisite: Two courses at the 200-level or per- 
mission of the instructor. {L/F} 4 credits 



Roman Letters 

Selected readings from Roman epistolary litera- 
ture, including works by Cicero, Pliny, and Senec 
Attention to the development of epistolary theory 
and style; mechanics of exchange; private vs. pub 
He correspondence; and verse adaptations of the 
letter form. Prerequisite: 216 or permission of th 
instructor. {L/F} 
Maureen Ryan 
Offered Fall 2002 

The Poetry of Lucretius 

Selections from the Be Rerum Natura with atten- 
tion to the place of Lucretius in the literary and 
philosophical traditions. {L/F} 
Justina Gregory 
Offered Spring 2003 

LAT 404 Special Studies 

Admission by permission of the department, for 
majors and honors students who have had four 
advanced courses in Latin. 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 



Graduate 



LAT 580 Studies in Latin Literature 

This will ordinarily be an enriched version of the 
300-level courses currently offered. 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 

Adviser for Graduate Study: Scott Bradbury. 

Classics in Translation 

CLS 190 The Trojan War 

The Trojan War is the first conflict to be memor 
ized in Greco-Roman literature — "the war to st 
all wars." For Homer and the poets who came 
after him it raised such questions as: What justii> 
going to war? What is the cost of combat and th< 
price of glory? How does war affect men, wome 
and children, winners and losers? We will look 
first at the "real" Troy of the archaeological 
record, then focus on imaginary Troy as repre- 
sented by Homer, Aeschylus, Euripides, Virgil, 
Ovid and Seneca. Wl {L/A} 4 credits 
Justina Gregory 
Offered Spring 2003 



lassical Languages and Literatures 



129 



LS 227 Classical Mythology 

he principal myths as they appear in Greek and 
oman literature, seen against the background of 
icient culture and religion. Focus on creation 
tyths. the structure and function of the Olympian 
antheon, the Troy cycle and artistic paradigms of 
ie hero. Some attention to modern retellings and 
Ustic representations of ancient myth. May not 
e taken S/U. {L/A} 4 credits 
:ott Bradbury 
ffered Fall 2002 

LS 235 Life and Literature in Ancient Rome 

study of the literature of Ancient Rome from its 
gendary beginnings to the triumph of Christian- 
,-. Emphasis on how literary culture intersects 
ith its social and historical context. Topics will 
elude: popular entertainment; literature as pro- 
banda; Roman virtues — and vices; the Romans 
love. {L} 4 credits 
aureen Ryan 
ffered Spring 2003 

"he Major in Greek, Latin, 
r Classics 

dvisers: Members of the Department. 

dviser for Study Abroad: Scott Bradbury. 

asis: in Greek, lOOd; in Latin, lOOd or 111; in 
assies, Greek lOOd and Latin lOOd or 111. 

equipments: in Greek, eight four-credit courses 
the language in addition to the basis; in Latin, 
ght four-credit courses in the language in addi- 
pn to the basis; in classics, eight four-credit 
purses in the languages in addition to the basis 
id including not fewer than two in each lan- 
fiage. 



The Major in Classical 
Studies 

Advisers: Members of the Department. 

Basis: GRK lOOd or LAT lOOd or 1 1 1 (or the 
equivalent) . Competence in both Greek and Latin 
is strongly recommended. 

Requirements: nine semester courses in addition 
to the basis. Four chosen from GRK (200-level or 
above) or LAT (200-level or above) ; at least two 
from classics in translation (CLS); and at least two 
appropriate courses in archaeology (ARC) , art 
history (ARH) , education (EDC) , government 
(GOV), ancient history (HST), philosophy (PHI), 
and/or religion (REL), chosen in accordance with 
the interests of the student and in consultation 
with the adviser. With the approval of the adviser, 
courses in other departments and programs may 
count toward the major. 

The Minor in Greek 

Advisers: Members of the Department. 

Requirements: six four-credit courses, of which at 
least four must be courses in the Greek language 
and at least three must be at or above the 200 
(intermediate) level. The remaining courses may 
be chosen from Greek history, Greek art, ancient 
philosophy, ancient political theory, ancient reli- 
gion, or classics in translation. At least one course 
must be chosen from this category. 

The Minor in Latin 

Advisers: Members of the Department. 

Requirements: six four-credit courses, of which at 
least four must be courses in the Latin language 
and at least three must be at or above the 200 
(intermediate) level. The remaining courses may- 
be chosen from Roman history, Roman art, an- 
cient political theory; ancient religion, or classics 
in translation. At least one course must be chosen 
from this category. 



1 30 Classical Languages and Literatun 

The Minor in Classics 

Advisers: Members of the Department. 

Requirements: six four-credit courses in Greek 
or Latin languages and literatures at or above the 
level of 212, including not fewer than two in each 
language. One of these six courses may be re- 
placed by a course related to classical antiquity 
offered either within or outside the department, 
and taken with the department's prior approval. 

Honors in Greek, Latin, 
Classics, or Classical Studies 

Director: Scott Bradbury. 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

Requirements: the same as those for the major, 
with the addition of a thesis, to be written over the 
course of two semesters, and an examination in 
the general area of the thesis. 

Greek, Latin, or Classics 

Graduate 

590d Research and Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

590 Research and Thesis 

4 or 8 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 






131 



Comparative Literature 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



, :l Ann Rosalind Jones, Ph.D. (Comparative 
Literature) , Director Fall 

'ofessors 

Maria Banerjee, Ph.D. (Russian Language and 

Literature) 
izabeth Harries, Ph.D. (English Language and 

Literature and Comparative Literature) 
Hans Rudolf Vaget, Ph.D. (German Studies and 

Comparative Literature) 

Thalia Alexandra Pandiri, Ph.D. (Classical 

Languages and Literatures and Comparative 

Literature) 
nie Vanpee, Ph.D. (French Language and 

Literature) 
Craig R. Davis, Ph.D. (English Language and 

Literature) , Director, Spring 



Associate Professors 

Anna Botta, Ph.D. (Italian Language and Literature 

and Comparative Literature) 
**i,*2 Re y es L^2 ar0) ph.D. (Spanish and 

Portuguese) 
Luc Gilleman, Ph.D. (English Language and 

Literature) 
Paula Varsano, Ph.D. (East Asian Languages and 

Literatures) 

Assistant Professors 

Ambreen Hai, Ph.D. (English Language and 

Literature) 
Sabina Knight, Ph.D. (East Asian Languages and 

Literatures) 
Katwiwa Mule, Ph.D. (Comparative Literature and 

Afro-American Studies) 



isiting Professors Lecturers 

any Berger, Jr., Kennedy Professor in Renaissance Margaret Bruzelius, Ph.D. (Comparative 

Studies Literature) 

jala ni Dhomhnaill, Neilson Professor in James Hicks, Ph.D. (English and Comparative 

Comparative Literature Literature) 



comparative study of literature in two languages, 
ie of which may be English. 

LT 291 Western Classics in Translation, 
om Homer to Dante 

LT 292 Western Classics in Translation, 
om Chretien de Troyes to Tolstoy 

:erequisite: 291. 

>ee p. 379.) An interdepartmental course, GLT 
) 1 is a requirement for the major. Students inter- 
ned in Comparative Literature should take it as 
irly as possible. First-year students eligible for 
ivanced placement in English by virtue of an AP 



score of 4 or 5 and first-year students with an SAT 
or English achievement score of 710 are encour- 
aged to register for GLT 291 . 

Comparative literature courses are not open to 
first-year students (except with the permission of 
the instructor). After the first year all 200-level 
courses are open to all students unless otherwise 
specified. Courses at the 300 level require at least 
one 200-level literature course, or permission of 
the instructor. 

In all Comparative Literature courses, readings 
and discussion are in English, but students are 
encouraged to read works in the original language 
whenever they are able. 



132 



Comparative Literatui 



Genre 



234 The Adventure Novel: No Place for a 
Woman? 

This course explores the link between landscape, 
plot and gender: how is the adventure landscape 
organized? Who lives where within it? What bound- 
aries mark safe and unsafe places? Beginning with 
essays on cartography by Denis Wood, we'll read 
three classic 19th-century boys' books (Scott, 
Stevenson, Verne) , then adventure fictions with 
female protagonists by E.M. Forster, Ursula Le 
Guin, Peter Dickinson, Astrid Lundren and others, 
to explore the ways in which this genre has em- 
braced and resisted female heroes. {L} 4 credits 
Margaret Bruzelius 
Offered Spring 2003 

EAL 235 How Poems Mean In China and the 
West 

"Words do not convey meaning'' — a dictum as 
valid for Confucians as it was for Taoists and Bud- 
dhists. How, then, did poetry maintain its status as 
the most respected form of artistic expression in 
China for at least three thousand years? Through a 
comparative study of poetic theory and practice in 
traditional Chinese and European literatures, stu- 
dents will hone their ability to read poetry across 
cultures by considering the following questions: 
What are the myths of poetic creation and how do 
they reflect and influence the reading, writing and 
criticism of poetry 7 over time? How do these cul- 
tures construct the link between words and mean- 
ing? What constitutes a "good" poem in East and 
West, and do those qualities survive translation? 
(E) {L} 4 credits 
Paula Varsano 
Offered Spring 2003 

236 War Stories 

An inquiry into representations of war in the late 
20th century, this course will focus primarily on 
two armed conflicts, ihe guerra sucia in Argentina 
and the recent war in Bosnia and Herzegovina. We 
will examine a variety of media: photography cin- 
ema, theater, poetry, drama, and narrative, as well 
as testimonials and documentaries. Our discus- 
sions will respond to readings grounded in theory 
in addition to context. In addition to asking ques- 
tions such as "what happened?" and "why?,'" we 
will treat historical representation, even history 



itself, as a text, asking questions such as "who is 
speaking?," "who is the audience?," and "what ar 
the rules for such discourse?" {L} 4 credits 
James Hicks 
Offered Spring 2003 

255 Studies in the Nineteenth-Century Shorl 
Story 

How did the modern short story emerge — why, 
where, when? What is its relation to other forms c 
short fiction — the Italian novella or the German 
novelle, or the fairy tale? Why are they often so 
elaborately framed, with their kernel presented 
as a kind of oral performance: a story told by one 
character to another? Why do they so often rely oi 
the fantastic and the unlikely — and how, by the 
end of the century, did the story come to concen- 
trate instead on the mundane and the ordinary? 
What, in short, makes a tale worth telling? Read- 
ings in Goethe, Hoffman, Hawthorne, Gogol, 
Turgenev, Maupassant, Verga, Kipling, Chekhov, 
Jewett, and others. {L} 4 credits 
Michael Gorra 
Offered Spring 2003 

267 African Women's Drama 

This course will examine how African women 
playwrights use drama to confront the realities o 
women's lives in contemporary Africa. What is th 
specificity of the vision unveiled in African 
women's drama? How do the playwrights use 
drama to mock rigid power structures and con- 
front crisis, instability and cultural expression ir 
postcolonial Africa? How and for what purposes 
do they interweave the various aspects of perfor- 
mance in African oral traditions with elements c, 
European drama? Readings, some translated fro 
French, Swahili and other African languages, w i 
include Ama Ata Aidoo's An oua, Osonye Tess 
Omvueme's Tell It to Women: An Epic Drama j 
Women, and Penina Mlama's Nguzo Mama 
(Mother Pillar). (E) {L} 4 credits 
Katwiwa Mule 
Offered Fall 2002 



305 Studies in the Novel 

Topic: The Postmodern Novel: Open 

Encyclopedias 

Twentieth-century fictions began to present the 

selves as open encyclopedias — a contradictory 

genre, given that "encyclopedia" etymological! 






bmparative Literature 



133 



jggests ail attempt to enclose all knowledge 
■thin a circle. Postmodernism, even more, sees 
le totality of what can be known as potential, 
)njectural and manifold; postmodern writers 
due skepticism and unresolvable heterogeneity. 
?t they still attempt to establish observable rela- 
onships between worldly codes and methods of 
nowledge. We'll read fictions by Borges, Calvino, 
elati, LeGuin, Perec, Pynchon and Queneau as 
samples of open encyclopedias, exhilarating voy- 
jes through a puzzling cosmos that includes 
'issing pieces. Theoretical texts by writers such as 
eleuze, Foucault, Guattari, Haraway and Virilio 
ill help us to map the preconditions of our 
3stmodemity. {L} 4 credits 
nna Botta 
ffered Fall 2002 

^riod/Movement 

LS 190 The Trojan War 

he Trojan War is the first conflict to be memorial- 
ed in Greco-Roman literature — "the war to start 
u wars." For Homer and the poets who came 
ter him it raised such questions as: What justifies 
jing to war? What is the cost of combat and the 
rice of glory? How does war affect men, women 
id children, winners and losers? We will look 
rst at the "real" Troy of the archaeological 
?cord, then focus on imaginary Troy as repre- 
?nted by Homer, Aeschylus, Euripides, Virgil, 
vid and Seneca. Wl {L/A} 4 credits 
istina Gregory 
ffered Spring 2003 

05 Twentieth-Century Literatures of Africa 

n introduction to the major genres and writers of 
lodern Africa. Novels, short stories, drama and 
pics from every region of Africa, focusing on the 
ay in which they draw upon traditional oral cul- 
lres, confront over a century of European colo- 
ialism on the continent, and represent contem- 
orary postcolonial realities. Texts, some written 
i English and others translated from French and 
ach African languages as Swahili and Songhay, 
ill include Achebe's Things Fall Apart, Ngugi's 
he River Between, Bessie Head's Maru, Mariama 
m So Long A Letter, Soyinka's Death and the 
"ing's Horseman, and The Epic ofAskia 



Mohammed, recounted by Nohou Malio. (E) {L} 
4 credits 
Katwiwa Mule 
Offered Fall 2002 

CLS 227 Classical Mythology 

The principal myths as they appear in Greek and 
Roman literature, seen against the background of 
ancient culture and religion. Focus on creation 
myths, the structure and function of the Olympian 
pantheon, the Troy cycle and artistic paradigms of 
the hero. Some attention to modern retellings and 
artistic representations of ancient myth. May not 
be taken S/U. {L/A} 4 credits 
Scott Bradbury 
Offered Fall 2002 

229 The Renaissance Gender Debate 

In "La Querelle des Femmes" medieval and Re- 
naissance writers (1350-1650) took on misogy- 
nist ideas from the ancient world and early Chris- 
tianity: woman as failed man, irrational animal, 
fallen Eve. Writers debated women's sexuality (in- 
satiable or purer than men's?) , marriage (the hell 
of nagging wives or the highest Christian state?), 
women's souls (nonexistent or subtler than 
men's?) , female education (a waste of time or a 
social necessity?) . Brief study of the social and 
cultural changes fuelling the polemic; analysis of 
the many literary forms it took, from Chaucer's 
Wife of Bath to Shakespeare's Taming of the 
Shrew, women scholars' dialogues, such as 
Moderata Foete's The Worth of Women, and pam- 
phlets from the popular press. Some attention to 
the battle of the sexes in the visual arts. Recom- 
mended: a previous course in classics, medieval 
or Renaissance studies or women's studies. {L} 
4 credits 
Annjones 
Offered Fall 2002 

230 Topics in Renaissance Culture 

Topic: Fictions of the Pose: Self Representation 
in Portraits, Poems and Plays 
Close study of performance and performance 
anxiety in pained portraits, lyric poems, and the 
Shakespearean soliloquy. Examples from three 
different cultural contexts: the Italian city state, the 
Dutch republic, and the English monarchy. We'll 
inquire into the possible causes of markers of 



134 



Comparative Literatui 



anxiety in particular acts of self-presentation: the 
demands made by different media and genres; the 
cultural constructions of gender, class, and occu- 
pation; the ways Renaissance communities with 
different histories, political constitutions, and so- 
cial formations shape the motives for self-presen- 
tation. How do conventional genre distinctions 
affect our sense of the relations established be- 
tween imaginary figures, poses, actions, events, 
and the virtual observers or readers constructed 
by those images and texts? 
Harry Berger 
Offered Fall 2002 

ENG 241 Postcolonial Literature 

An introduction to Anglophone fiction, nonfiction, 
poetry, drama and film from Africa, the Caribbean 
and South Asia in the aftermath of the British em- 
pire. Central concerns: literary-as-political re- 
sponses to histories of colonial dominance; the 
ambivalent relation to English linguistic, literary 
and cultural legacies; the agency of literature in 
the construction of national identity and the revi- 
sion of history; revaluations of hybridity; redefini- 
tions of race, gender and sexuality; global 
diasporas and U.S. imperialism. Readings include: 
Achebe, Soyinka, Aidoo, Naipaul, Walcott, Cliff, 
Rushdie, Kureishi, Arundhati Roy, some theoretical 
essays. Recommended background: A CLT or ENG 
course at the 200-level, ENG 265 or HST 295. {L} 
4 credits 
Ambreen Hai 
Offered Fall 2002 

259 Realism 

Analysis of 19th-century works in relation to the 
rise of the middle class, the centrality of the family 
and the authority of the father. Emphasis on con- 
ventional Realist narration of adultery, broken 
marriage and women's atonement through death 
in novels by Balzac, Fontane and Tolstoy; attention 
to gaps and tensions in such texts, which destabi- 
lize both the family as a social institution and the 
novel as form. Study of 20th-century Realism will 
focus on the relations between literature and so- 
cial change (Gorki's The Mother and Brecht's 
stage adaptation) and on founding narratives by 
writers beyond Europe, including Jacques 
Roumain, Alejo Carpentier and Jorge Amado. 
{L} 4 credits 



Gertraud Gutzmann 
Offered Spring 2003 

361 Composing Knowledge in the 
Renaissance 

In the Renaissance, the composition of knowl- 
edge — the ways it was written and shaped — took 
a wide variety- of forms. We will examine Renais- 
sance texts that sought out, defined and attemptec 
to convey knowledge (poems, fictions, treatises, 
essays, maps), the persona created by writers 
emerging in this quest (theologians, mystics, hu- 
manists, astrologers, physicians, poets) and the 
conceptions of knowledge that informed their 
work (divinity, authoritative prior texts, esoterica, 
scientific observation) . Readings will include 
Christine de Pizan, Montaigne, Teresa of Avila, 
Nostradamus, Ficino, and Descartes. {L} 4 credits 
Nicolas Russell (French) 
Offered Spring 2003 

ENG 391 Modern South Asian Writers 

A study of selected texts in the checkered traditioi 
of South Asian literature in English, from the earl] 
poetry of Sarojini Naidu to the recent surge of 
Indian and diasporic writers and film-makers, 
such as Arundhati Roy and Hanif Kureishi. Topics 
include: the (post) colonial fashioning of identitie 
the interventions of women in nationalist dis- 
course; the crafting of a new idiom in English; the 
choices of genre and form (fiction, poetry, mem- 
oir, film); the problems of memory, historiogra- 
phy, trauma; diaspora and the making of "home. 
Writers may include: Anand, Narayan, Rao, 
Markandaya, Naipaul, Desai, Rushdie, Suleri, 
Ghosh, Kureishi, Mukherjee, Lahiri. Supplemen- 
tary readings in postcolonial theory and criticisn 
[3d] {L} 4 credits 
Ambreen Hai 
Offered Spring 2003 



Special Topics 



201 Literary Anti-Semitism 

How can we tell whether a literary work is anti- 
Semitically coded? What are the religious, socia 
cultural factors that shape imaginings of 
Jewishness? How does the Holocaust affect the 
way we look at constructions of the Jew today? 



omparative Literature 



135 



selection of seminal theoretical texts; examples 
lostly from literature but also from opera and 
inema. Shakespeare, Marlow, Cervantes, G.E. 
essing, Grimm Brothers, Balzac, Dickens, 
/agner, Zola, T. Mann, V. Harlan; S. Friedlander; 
I. Gelber, S. Gilman, G. Langmuir, Y.H. 
erushalmi. {L/H} 4 credits 
'ansR. Vaget 
ffered Spring 2003 

NG 207 The Technology of Reading and 
/riting 

n introductory exploration of the physical forms 
lat knowledge and communication have taken in 
le West, from ancient oral cultures to modern 
rint-literate culture. Our main interest will be in 
iscovering how what is said and thought in a cul- 
lre reflects its available kinds of literacy and me- 
ia of communication. Topics to include poetry 
nd memory in oral cultures; the invention of writ- 
lg; the invention of prose; literature and science 
i a script culture; the coming of printing; chang- 
ig concepts of publication, authorship, and origi- 
ality; movements toward standardization in lan- 
uage; political implications of different kinds and 
>vels of literacy. {L} 4 credits 
ric Reeves 
ffered Spring 2003 

18 Jewish Literature of Catastrophe 

his course explores Jewish literary responses to 
ational catastrophe from the destruction of an- 
ient Jerusalem to the Holocaust and its aftermath. 
»oes Holocaust literature build upon existing ar- 
hetypes from Jewish literature or establish itself 
s an entirely new literary genre? How do culture, 
inguage, and context influence the tenor of re- 
ponses to the destruction of European Jewry? 
tudy of works in various languages (particularly 
iebrew and Yiddish) and a variety of genres 
memoirs, ghetto diaries, partisan poetry, liturgy, 
ovels, comic strips) and of films from different 
ations. {L} 4 credits 
istin Cammy 
•ffered Fall 2002 

120 Colloquium 

opic: Imagining Language 

ve will think about the links between words and 

liings as philosophers and artists have imagined 



them. Reading largely pre-twentieth-century theo- 
ries of language by Plato, St. Augustine, Locke, 
Condillac, Freud and others, we will pair each of 
these thinkers with twentieth-century artists (po- 
ets, book makers, prose writers) who meditate in 
their work on the same questions of language. 
Short exercises (anagrams, rebuses, alphabet po- 
ems, portmanteau words) will be an integral part 
of the course. {L} 4 credits 
Margaret Bruzelius 
Offered Fall 2002 

GER 227 Brave New World: Women and the 
Experience of Exile 

The displacement of populations through war and 
ethnic strife has been a constant of world history, 
past and present. One of the examples of forced 
migration, with significant impact on American life 
and culture, is that of the Nazi period (1933-45) 
in Germany and Austria. This course will explore 
the exile experience of women from these lands 
(in the majority, German and Austrian Jews) : their 
endurance and resistance during the Nazi period, 
their central role in the survival of their families, 
and the effects of exile on their artistic work. 
Readings will include letters, diaries, memoirs, 
films, autobiographies, poems and fiction by writ- 
ers, artists, publishers, political activists and phi- 
losophers such as Hannah Arendt, Helen Wolff, 
Toni Sender, Anna Seghers, Erika Mann, Marlene 
Dietrich. The course will also include women writ- 
ers from other countries forced into exile for po- 
litical reasons (Eva Hoffman, Nawal el Saadawi, 
Marina Tsvetayeva). Conducted in English. Knowl- 
edge of German not required. {L/H} 4 credits 
Gertraud Gutzmann 
Offered Fall 2002 

240 Childhood in Literatures of Africa and 
the African Diaspora 

Childhood, intimately tied to social, political and 
cultural histories, to questions of self and national 
identity, entails specific crises in Africa and the 
African Diaspora, focusing on loss of language, 
exile, and memory. How does the enforced acqui- 
sition of a colonizer's language affect children 
as they attempt to master the codes of an alien 
tongue and culture? How do narratives told 
from the point of view of children represent 
and deal with such alienation, and what are the 



136 



Comparative Literatun 



relationships between recollections of childhood 
and published autobiography? Texts will include 
Camara Lave 's The African Child, Tahar Ben- 
Jalloun's The Sand Child, Julia Alvarez's How the 
Garcia Girls Lost their Accents, Toni Morrison's 
The Bluest Eye. {L} 4 credits 
Katwiwa Mule 
Offered Spring 2003 

EAL 261 Major Themes in Literature: East- 
West Perspectives 

{L} 4 credits 

Gendered Fate 

Is fate indifferent along lines of gender? What (and 
whose) interests are served by appeals to destiny? 
Close readings of women's narratives of desire, 
courtship, sexuality, prostitution and rape will 
explore how belief in inevitability 7 mystifies the 
gender-based oppression of social practices and 
institutions. Are love, marriage and mothering 
biological imperatives? What are love, seduction 
and desire if not freely chosen? Or is freely chosen 
love merely a Western ideal? How might women 
write to overcome fatalistic discourses that shape 
the construction of female subjectivity and agency? 
Works by Maya Angelou, Simone de Beauvoir, 
Hayashi Fumiko. Hong Ying, Nadine Gordimer, 
Toni Morrison, and Wang Anyi. All readings in 
English translation. 
Sabina Knight 
Offered Fail 2002 

268 Latina and Latin American Women 
Writers 

This course examines the last twenty years of 
Latina writing in this country while tracing the 
Latin American roots of many of the writers. Con- 
structions of ethnic identity, gender, Latinidad, 
"race,"' class, sexuality, and political conscious- 
ness are analyzed in tight of the writers' coming 
to feminism. Texts by Esmeralda Santiago, Gloria 
Anzaldiia, Sandra Cisneros, Judith Ortiz Cofer, 
Denise Chavez, Demetria Martinez, and many oth- 
ers are included in readings that range from po- 
etry and fiction to essay and theatre. Knowledge of 
Spanish is not required, but will be useful. First- 
year students must have the permission of the in- 
structor. {L} 4 credits 
Nancy Sternbacb 
Offered Spring 2003 



274 The Garden: Paradise and Battlefield 

Ever since Genesis, the garden has been depicted 
not only as a paradise, a refuge and a women's 
place, but also as a jungle that challenges defini- 
tions of the self and of that self's place in the 
world. How have shared notions about the relatioi 
of gardens to their inhabitants changed from one 
culture and historical period to another? Some 
attention to the theory and history of landscape 
gardening. Texts by Mme. de Lafayette, Goethe, 
Austen, Balzac, Zoia, Chekhov, Colette, D.H. 
Lawrence, and Alice Walker. {L} 4 credits 
Ann Leone 
Offered Spring 2003 

278 Madness in Women's Novels of Africa 
and the Caribbean 

The representation of madness in novels written ii 
English and French by women from Africa and the 
Caribbean. Beginning with an introduction to 
theories of madness, we will look specifically at 
how the category of madness functions in these 
novels, connoting on the one hand exoticism and 
marginality, and on the other a language of resis- 
tance. Emphasis on close formal analysis, with 
particular attention to how such narratives articu- 
late or obscure boundaries between madness ant 
reason, and how gender figures in these bound- 
aries. Essays by Edouard Glissant and Franz Fano: 
works by such authors as Ken Bugul. Tsitsi 
Dangarembga, Bessie Head. Jean Rhys, Manse 
Conde, and Myriam Warner- Vieyra. {L} 4 credits 
Dawn Fulton (French) 
Offered Spring 2003 

299 Europe on the Move: Recent Narratives 
of Immigration 

How have the dissolutions of the colonial empire 
and the Soviet Union redefined European identit 
In the new geopolitics of the European Commu- 
nity, have borders moved toward the center of 
states and societies and created new transnation 
classes of inclusion and exclusion? The narrativr 
of the many immigrants who have recently move 
to and within Europe to restructure life stories, 
translate the self, and negotiate new subjectivity 
in the shifting landscape of a Europe undergoin 
profound changes in the process of renewing it 
self. We will focus on the political, social and et • 
cal issues raised by this emerging literature anc 






^mparative Literature 



137 



(amine how its stories call accepted notions of 
aropean identity and borders into question, 
eadings from a broad selection of genres, au- 
iors and languages: Lela Sebbar, Azouz Begag, 
lan Goytisolo, Milan Kundera, Pap Khouma, Julia 
risteva, Eva Hoffman, Slavenka Drakuli. Regular 
m screenings. {L} 4 credits 
nna Bottajanie Vanpee 
ffered Spring 2003 

52 The "Don Juan" Theme 

nee the Renaissance, Don Juan has been called a 
:oundrel, a hero, a homosexual, a quintessential 
acho, a rebel against stifling social and sexual 
ores, an emblem of Spain. This course explores 
on Juan and the meaning of the word 
lonjuanesque" in literature and film. It focuses 
l literature as a continuous rewriting of previous 
odels, on the role of literature in the creation of 
itional and gender identities and stereotypes, and 
l the seduction and conquest of non-Western 
erary traditions by the West. Written materials 
ill be chosen among the following authors: Tirso, 
oliere, Byron, Zorrilla, Kierkegaard, Sand, 
"erimee, Baudelaire, Valle-Inclan, Camus and 
erger. Films include Peter Sellars' relocation of 
ozart's "Don Giovanni" in Spanish Harlem and 
mtemporary versions of male and female Don 
lan figures by Bergman, Godard, Valim, Saura, 
ediero and Suarez, as well as popular Spanish 
id Hollywood films. (E) {L} Wl 4 credits 
eyes Ldzaro 
ffered Spring 2004 

67 Imagined Homes: Literary 
iterpretations of the National Question 

lis course will analyze the works of twentieth- 
bntury writers who belong to national or ethnic 
ommunities struggling to constitute, maintain, or 
sfend a national identity against a dominant cul- 
ire and language. We will read works by Irish 
poth from the Republic of Ireland and from Ul- 
ter), Basque, Catalan, Puerto Rican, and Palestin- 
(Ji authors whose attitudes toward their involve- 
lent in the national project differ greatly. Com- 
mon thematic concerns to be stressed are the de- 
letion of Home, the relationship with the domi- 
nant culture, violence, and the conflict between 
jpguage and traditions. We will pay special atten- 
on to the gender assumptions underlying national 



discourse, as well as to the reconsideration of 
traditional perceptions of the nation which the 
reality of diaspora required. {L/H} 4 credits 
Reyes Ldzaro andNuala ni Dhomhnaill 
Offered Fall 2002 

Critical Theory and Method 

293 Writings and Rewritings: Contexts, 
Migrations Theory 

Topic for 2003: Global Tempests 
A study of how literary texts written in a particular 
historical and cultural moment are revised and 
transformed in new geographies, ideological 
frameworks, and art forms. To clarify' these pro- 
cesses, introductory readings in literary theory will 
also be part of the course. Prerequisite: GLT 291. 
Topic for 2002: Shakespeare's Tempest in the 
drama, essays, fiction, poetry and film of the 
Americas, Africa and the Caribbean. {L} 4 credits 
Katwiwa Mule 
Offered Spring 2003 

300 Contemporary Literary Theory 

The interpretation of literary and other cultural 
texts by psychoanalytic, Marxist, structuralist and 
post-structuralist critics. Emphasis on the theory 
as well as the practice of these methods: their as- 
sumptions about writing and reading and about 
literature as a cultural formation. Readings in- 
clude Freud, Lacan, Barthes, Derrida and Fou- 
cault. Enrollment limited to 25. {L} 4 credits 
Janie Vanpee 
Offered Fall 2002 

340 Problems in Literary Theory 

A final seminar required of senior majors, de- 
signed to explore one broad issue (e.g., exile, 
Magical Realism worldwide, self-portraiture and 
gender) defined at the end of the Fall semester by 
the students themselves. Prerequisites: GLT 291 
and CLT 300, or permission of the instructor. {L} 
4 credits 

Elizabeth Harries 
Offered Spring 2003 

404 Special Studies 

Admission by permission of the instructor and 

director. 4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 



138 



Comparative Literatur 



The Major 



Before entering the major, the student must prove 
her proficiency by completing a course in the for- 
eign language or languages of her choice at the 
level of GER 225, GRK 212, ITL 250, LAT 212, RUS 
338, SPN 250 or SLL 260, or FRN 230, 253 or 
254. FRN 260 may be counted as one of the three 
advanced courses in literature required for the 
comparative literature major. If a student has not 
demonstrated her proficiency in courses at Smith 
College, it will be judged by the department con- 
cerned. 

Requirements: 13 semester courses as follows: 

1. three comparative literature courses, from any 
three categories of period or movement, genre, 
and special topic. Only courses with a primary 
or cross-listing in Comparative Literature count 
as comparative literature courses; 

2. three appropriately advanced courses, ap- 
proved by the major adviser, in each of the 
literatures of two languages, one of which may 
be English. If a student takes both terms of a 
year-long literary survey in a foreign language 
(e.g., FRN 253, 254), she may count the sec- 
ond term as an advanced literature course. No 
foreign literature course in which the reading 
is assigned in English translation may be 
counted toward the comparative literature 
major; 

3. GLT 291, CLT 293, CLT 300, CLT 340. (Note: 
GLT 291 is a prerequisite for 293 and 340 and 
should be taken as early as possible.); 

4. among the literature courses taken for the 
major, in the CLT program or in language and 
literature departments, one course must focus 
on texts from cultures beyond the European/ 
American mainstream: e.g., East Asian, African 
or Caribbean writing, or minority writing in 
any region. One course must focus on litera- 
ture written before 1800. (GLT 291 does not 
fulfill this requirement.) One course must in- 
clude substantial selections of poetry. Each 
student will consult with her adviser about how 
her courses fulfill these requirements. 



Honors 

Requirements: the same as those for the major, 
with the addition of a thesis (430d), to be written 
in both semesters of the senior year. The first dral 
will be due on the first day of the second semestei 
and will be commented on by both the adviser an 
the second reader. The final draft will be due on 
April 1, to be followed later in April by an oral 
presentation and discussion of the thesis. 

Director: Paula Varsano. 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; offered each year 

Director of Study Abroad: Ann Jones 



139 



Computer Science 



r 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



•rofessors 

lichael 0. Albertson, Ph.D., (Mathematics) 
)seph O'Rourke, Ph.D., Chair 

associate Professors 

lerrie Bergmann, Ph.D. 
►ominique F. Thiebaut, Ph.D. 
1 Ileana Streinu, Ph.D. 



Assistant Professors 

* 2 Judy Franklin, Ph.D. 
Nicholas Howe, Ph.D. 

Judith Cardell, Ph.D. (Clare Booth Luce Assistant 
Professor of Computing Engineering) 



our computer science courses have no prerequi- 
ites. These are CSC 102 (How The Internet 
/orks), CSC 104 (Issues in Artificial Intelligence), 
SC 1 1 1 (Computer Science I), and CSC 294 (In- 
•oduction to Computational Linguistics) . Students 
r ho contemplate a major in computer science 
lould consult with a major adviser early in their 
ollege career. 

02 How The Internet Works 

n introduction to the structure, design, and op- 
ration of the Internet, including the electronic 
nd physical structure of networks; how email and 
eb browsers work, domain names, mail and file 
'ansfer protocols, encoding and compression of 
oth text and graphics, http and HTML, the design 
fweb pages, and the operation of search engines, 
oth history and societal implications are ex- 
lored. Prerequisite: basic familiarity with word 
rocessing. Enrollment limited to 50 (25 per see- 
on). The course will meet for the first half of the 
iBmester only. {M} 2 credits 
)seph O'Rourke 
ffered both semesters each year 

04 Issues in Artificial Intelligence 

half-semester introduction to several current 
sues in the area of Artificial Intelligence: intelli- 
ent behavior vs. rational thought: the Turing Test 
nd game programs; 2) learning and discovery: 
embolic and numeric; 3) embodied intelligence: 



new directions robotics. Prerequisites: fluency 
with computers, including basic Web searching 
skills. Four years of high school mathematics rec- 
ommended. (E) {M} 2 credits 
Joseph O'Rourke 
Offered second half of Spring 2003 

105 Interactive Web Documents 

A half-semester introduction to the design and 
creation of interactive environments on the world 
wide web. Focus on three area: 1) Web site de- 
sign; 2) Javascript; 3) Embedded multimedia ob- 
jects. Enrollment limited to 25. Prerequisites: CSC 
102 or equivalent competency with HTML. (E) 
{M} 2 credits 
Nicholas Howe 

Offered second half of the semester, Fall 
2002 

111 Computer Science I 

Introduction to a block-structured high-level pro- 
gramming language. Will cover language syntax 
and use the language to teach program design, 
coding, debugging, testing, and documentation. 
Procedural and data abstraction are introduced. 
Enrollment limited to 40; 20 per lab section. {M} 
4 credits 

Merrie Bergmann, Fall 2002 
Judy Franklin, Spring 2003 
Offered both semesters each year 



140 



Computer Science 



112 Computer Science II 

Elementary data structures (linked lists, stacks, 
queues, trees) and algorithms (searching, sort- 
ing) are covered, including a study of recursion 
and the object-oriented programming paradigm. 
The language of instruction is C++. The program- 
ming goals of portability, efficiency and data ab- 
straction are emphasized. Prerequisite: 1 1 1 or 
equivalent. Enrollment limited to 30. {M} 4 credits 
Nicolas Howe, Fall 2002 
Dominique Thiebaut, Spring 2003 
Offered both semesters each year 

231 Microcomputers and Assembly 
Language 

An introduction to the architecture of 80x86 PCS, 
and to assembly language programming. Prerequi- 
site: 112 or permission of the instructor. {M} 
4 credits 

Dominique Thiebaut 
Offered Fall 2002 

240 Computer Graphics 

Covers two-dimensional line drawings and trans- 
formations, three-dimensional graphics, clipping 
and windowing, color raster graphics, hidden 
surface removal, animation, and fractals. Students 
will write programs for a variety of graphics de- 
vices; a programming-intensive course. Prerequi- 
sites: 112, MTH 2 1 1 or permission of the instruc- 
tor. {M} 4 credits 
Joseph O'Rourke 
Offered Spring 2003 

250 Foundations of Computer Science 

Automata and finite state machines, regular sets 
and regular languages; push-down automata and 
context-free languages; computability and Turing 
machines. Prerequisites: 111 and MTH 153. {M} 
4 credits 

Me trie Bergman n 
Offered Fall 2002 

252 Algorithms 

Covers algorithm design techniques ("divide-and- 
conquer," dynamic programming, "greedy" algo- 
rithms, etc.), analysis techniques (including big-0 
notation, recurrence relations), useful data struc- 
tures (including heaps, search trees, adjacency 
lists) , efficient algorithms for a variety of prob- 



lems, and NP-completeness. Prerequisites: 112, 
MTH 111, MTH 153. {M} 4 credits 
Joseph O'Rourke 
Offered Fall 2002 

262 Introduction to Operating Systems 

An introduction to the functions of an operating 
system and their underlying implementation. Top- 
ics include file systems, CPU and memory manage- 
ment, concurrent communicating processes, 
deadlock, and access and protection issues. Pro- 
gramming projects will implement and explore 
algorithms related to several of these topics. 
Prerequisite: 231. {M} 4 credits 
Nicholas Howe 
Offered Spring 2003 

270 Digital Circuits and Computer Systems 

This class introduces the operation of logic and 
sequential circuits. We explore basic logic gates 
(and, or, nand, nor), counters, flip-flops, decod- 
ers, and the more sophisticated circuits found in 
microprocessor systems. Students have the oppor- 
tunity to design and implement digital circuits 
during a weekly lab. Prerequisite: 231. Enrollmen 
limited to 12. {M} 4 credits 
Dominique Thiebaut 
Offered Spring 2003 

350 Seminar in Computer Networks 

This course introduces fundamental concepts in 
the design and implementation of computer com- 
munication networks, their protocols, and appli- 
cations. Topics to be covered include: layered 
network architecture, physical layer and data linl 
protocols, and transport protocols, routing protc 
cols and applications. Most case studies will be 
drawn from the Internet TCP/IP protocol suite. 
Prerequisite: 231. {M} 4 credits 
Merrie Bergman n 
Offered Spring 2003 

354 Seminar in Digital Sound and Music 
Processing 

Focuses on areas of sound/music manipulation 
that overlap significantly with computer science 
disciplines. Topics are digital manipulation of 
sound (file formats, compression, and software 
sound synthesis) ; formal models of machines ai 
languages to analyze and generate sound and m 



lomputer Science 



141 



ic; algorithms and techniques from artificial intel- Thg M 3,1 OV 

igence for music composition and music database ' 

etrieval; and hardware aspects such as time-de- 

>endence and synchronization requirements and 

ledicated hardware. This is a hands-on course in 

vhich music is actively generated via program- 

ning projects and includes a final installation or 

lemonstration. Prerequisites are 111, 112, and 

!50 or permission of the instructor. 4 credits 

my Franklin \ 

)ffered Spring 2003 2. 



Advisers: Merrie Bergmann, Judy Frankhn, 
Nicholas Howe, Joseph O'Rourke, Dominique 
Thiebaut. 

Requirements: At least 1 1 semester courses (44 
credits) including: 



(94 Introduction to Translators and Compiler 
)esign 

ncludes top-down and bottom-up parsing metri- 
cs, lexical analysis, code generation and optimi- 
ation techniques. Students will implement a corn- 
tiler for a simple high-level programming lan- 
;uage. Prerequisites: 231 and 250. Enrollment 
imitedto 15. {M} 4 credits 
udy Franklin 
)ffered Fall 2002 

Cross-listed and 
Interdepartmental Courses 

/ITH 270 Introduction to Numerical Methods 

/ITH 353 Advanced Topics in Discrete 
Applied Mathematics 

opic: Complexity Theory 
iood versus bad algorithms, easy versus intrac- 
able problems. The complexity classes P, NP and 
ji investigation of NP-Completeness. The algo- 
ithms will be drawn from number theory, linear 
lgebra, combinatorics and graph theory, and 
omputer science. Alternates with MTH 364a. Pre- 
equisites: 211, 212, 253 or permission of the 
nstructor. {M} 4 credits 
lichael Albertson 
)ffered Spring 2003 

^00 Special Studies 

: or majors, by arrangement with a computer sci- 
■nce faculty member. Variable credit as assigned 
)ffered both semesters each year 



111,112,231,250; 

a. One of MTH 111, MTH 112, MTH 114; 

b. MTH 153; 

c. One 200-level or higher math course, 
(MTH 125 may replace the requirements of 2a 
and 2b.) 

At least one of 252, 274, 280; 

At least one of 262, 270; 

At least one 300-level course; 

At least one additional CSC course beyond the 

100-level. 



The Minor 



Students may minor in Computer Science by fulfill- 
ing the requirements for one of the following con- 
centrations or by designing, with department ap- 
proval, their own sequence of six courses, which 
must include 1 1 1 and 1 12, and one 300-level 
course. 

1. Systems (six courses) 

Advisers: Dominique Thiebaut, Judy Franklin. 

This minor is appropriate for a student with a 
strong interest in computer systems and computer 
software. 

Required courses: 

1 1 1 Computer Science I 

112 Computer Science H 

220 Advanced Programming Techniques 

231 Microcomputers and Assembly Language 

262 Introduction to Operating Systems 

One of: 

330 Topics in Database Systems 

350 Seminar in Computer Networks 



142 



Computer Scienci 



2. Computer Science and Language 
(six courses) 

Adviser: Merrie Bergmann. 

The goal of this minor is to provide the student 
with an understanding of the use of language as a 
means of communication between human beings 
and computers. 

Required courses: 

1 1 1 Computer Science I 

112 Computer Science II 

250 Foundations of Computer Science 
Two of: 

280 Topics in Programming Languages 
290 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence 
294 Computational Linguistics 
One of: 

390 Seminar in Artificial Intelligence 
394 Introduction to Translators and Compiler 
Design 

3. Mathematical Foundations of 
Computer Science (six courses) 

Adviser: Michael Albertson. 



Honors 

Director: Joseph O'Rourke. 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 



431 Thesis 

8 credits 

Requirements: normally the requirements for the 
major, with a thesis in the senior year. The specific 
program will be designed with the approval of the 
director. 



Theoretical computer science and discrete math- 
ematics are inseparable. The unifying feature of 
this minor is the study of algorithms, from the 
points of view of both a mathematician and a com- 
puter scientist. The study includes proving the 
correctness of an algorithm, measuring its com- 
plexity, and developing the correspondence be- 
tween the formal mathematical structures and the 
abstract data structures of computer science. 

Required courses: 

1 1 1 Computer Science I 

112 Computer Science II 

250 Foundations of Computer Science 
252 Algorithms 

MTH 253 Combinatorics and Graph Theory 
MTH 353 Advanced Topics in Discrete Applied 
Mathematics 



143 



Dance 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 


rofessor 


Constance Vans Hill, Ph.D. (Five College Visiting 


jsan Kay Waltner, M.S., Five College Chair 


Associate Professor, Hampshire College) 




Kenneth Lipitz (Lecturer, University of 


ssociate Professors 


Massachusetts) 


! Yvonne Daniel, Ph.D. (Dance and Afro- 


Daphne Lowell, M.F.A. (Professor, 


American Studies) 


Hampshire College) 


odger Blum, M.F.A., Chair 


Rebecca Nordstrom, M.F.A. (Professor, 



ssistant Professor 

ugusto Soledade, M.F.A. 

ecturer 

rip Sri Maeny Sumarsam 

ive College Lecturers 

illbob Brown, M.A. (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
m Coleman, M.F.A. (Professor, 

Mount Holyoke College) 
anjana Devi (Lecturer, University of 

Massachusetts, Fine Arts Center) 
harles Flachs., M.A. (Assistant Professor, Mount 

Holyoke College) 
ose Flachs (Assistant Professor, Mount Holyoke 

College) 
erese Freedman, B.A. (Professor, 

Mount Holyoke College) 



Hampshire College) 
Peggy Schwartz, M.A. (Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
Wendy Woodson, M.A. (Associate Professor, 

Amherst College) 

Principal Pianist/Lecturer 

Julius M. Robinson, B.S. 

Teaching Fellows 

Kiara D. Brown 
Megan Frazier 
Samantha Kenney 
Jacqueline Kinsman 
Cathy Nicoli 
Candice Salyers 
Christina Tsoules 
Thomas Vacanti 



he Five College Dance Department combines the 
rograms of Amherst College, Hampshire College, 
lount Holyoke College, Smith College, and the 
i Diversity of Massachusetts. The faculty operates 
s a consortium, coordinating curricula, perfor- 
mances, and services. The Five College Dance De- 
partment supports a variety of philosophical ap- 
; roaches to dance and provides an opportunity for 
tudents to experience a wide spectrum of perfor- 
lance styles and techniques. Course offerings are 



coordinated among the campuses to facilitate reg- 
istration, interchange, and student travel; students 
may take a dance course on any of the five cam- 
puses and receive credit at the home institution. 

Students should consult the Five College 
Course lists (specifying times, locations and new 
course updates) at both the Smith College Dance 
Office and the Five College Dance Department 
Office, located at Hampshire College. 



144 



Danci 



Theory Courses 



Preregistration for dance theory courses is 
strongly recommended. Enrollment in dance com- 
position courses is limited to 20 students, and 
priority is given to seniors and juniors. "P" indi- 
cates that permission of the instructor is required. 
"L" indicates that enrollment is limited. 

Dance Composition 

Introductory through advanced study of elements 
of dance composition, including phrasing, space, 
energy, motion, rhythm, musical forms, character 
development, and personal imagery- Course work 
emphasizes organizing and designing movement 
creatively and meaningfully in a variety of forms 
(solo, duet and group), and utilizing various de- 
vices and approaches, e.g. motif and development, 
theme and variation, text and spoken language, 
collage, structured improvisation, and others. 

All Dance Theory 7 Courses: L {A} 4 credits 

151 Elementary Dance Composition 

L {A} 4 credits 

A. Composition 

AC (Woodson), EC (Lowell) 



171 Dance in the 20th Century 

This course is designed to present an overview of 
dance as a performing art in the 20th century, 
focusing especially on major American stylistic 
traditions and artists. Through readings, video an( 
film viewing, guest performances, individual re- 
search projects, and class discussions, students 
will explore principles and traditions of 20th Cen- 
tury concert dance traditions, with special atten- 
tion to their historical and cultural contexts. Spe- 
cial topics may include European and American 
ballet, the modern dance movement, contempo- 
rary and avant-garde dance experimentation, Afri- 
can-American dance forms, jazz dance, and popu- 
lar culture dance traditions. L {A} Wl 4 credits 
Susan Waltner, MHC (Flachs) 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

241 Scientific Foundations of Dance 

An introduction to selected scientific aspects of 
dance, including anatomical identification and 
terminology, physiological principles, and condi- 
tioning/strengthening methodology. These con- 
cepts are discussed and explored experientially in 
relationship to the movement vocabularies of vari- 
ous dance styles. Enrollment limited to 20. {A} 
4 credits 

MHC (Freedman) 
Offered Fall 2002 



B. Composition 

To be announced 

252 Intermediate Dance Composition 

Prerequisite: 151. L. {A} 4 credits 

A. UM (Schwartz) 

B. Scripts and Scores 
AC (Woodson) 
Offered Spring 2003 

353 Advanced Dance Composition 

Prerequisite: 252 or permission of the instructor. 

L. {A} -i credits 

AC (Woodson). Fall 2002 

To be announced. Spring 2003 

Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 



342 Scientific Foundations of Dance II 

A continuation of the scientific aspects of dance, 
including anatomical identification and terminol- • 
ogy, physiological principles, and conditioning/ 
strengthening methodology. These concepts are j 
discussed and explored experientially in relation- 
ship to the movement vocabularies of various 
dance styles. Prerequisite: 241 or permission of ' 
the instructor. Required of all graduate students i 1 
Dance. L. {A} 4 credits 
UM (To be announced) 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

272 Dance and Culture 

Through a survey of world dance traditions from 
both artistic and anthropological perspectives, tl 
course introduces students to dance as a univerj 
human behavior, and to the many dimensions of 
its cultural practice — social, religious, political, 
and aesthetic. Course materials are designed to 



•aiice 



145 



rovide students with a foundation for the interdis- 
iplinary study of dance in society, and the tools 
ecessary for analyzing cross-cultural issues in 
ance; they include readings, video and film view- 
lg, research projects and dancing. (A prerequi- 
te for Dance 375, Anthropology of Dance). L. 
\) 4 credits 
o be announced 
ffered Fall 2003 



additional readings and research into broader 
issues of historical context, genre, and technical 
style. Course work may be developed through ex- 
isting repertory or through the creation of new 
work(s). Prerequisite: advanced technique or 
permission of the instructor. {A} 2 or 4 credits 
To be announced 

Offered Fall 2002 as a 4 credit course 
Offered Spring 2003 as a 2 credit course 



85 Laban Movement Analysis I 

aban Movement Analysis is a system used to de- 
:ribe and record quantitative and qualitative as- 
ects of human movement. Through study and 
hysical exploration of concepts and principles 
lvolved in body articulation, spatial organization, 
ynamic exertion of energy and modes of shape 
tiange, students will examine their own move- 
lent patterns and preferences. This creates the 
otential for expanding personal repertoire and 
eveloping skills in observation and analysis of the 
lovement of others. 
r C (Nordstrom) 
ffered Fall 2003 

87 Analysis of Music from a Dancer's 
erspective 

his course is the study of music from a dancer's 
erspective. Topics include musical notation, 
twthmic dictation, construction of rhythm, and 
lements of composition. Dancers choreograph to 
pecific compositional forms, develop both com- 
ninication between dancer and musician and 
iusic listening skills. Prerequisite: one year of 
ance technique (recommended for sophomore 
ear or later). Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 
credits 

IHC (Jones), UM (Ascenzo), Fall 2002 
dius Robinson < Spring 2003 

109 Advanced Repertory 

his course offers an in-depth exploration of aes- 
letic and interpretive issues in dance perfor- 
mance. Through experiments with improvisation, 
lusical phrasing, partnering, personal imagery 
nd other modes of developing and embodying 
movement material, dancers explore ways in 
rtuch a choreographer's vision is formed, altered, 
dapted, and finally presented in performance. In 
ts four credit version, this course also requires 



375 The Anthropology of Dance 

This course is a cross-cultural examination of 
dance in the history of anthropology. Comparative 
studies from Australia, Africa, Indonesia, Europe, 
the circum-polar regions, and the Americas are 
used as examples of the importance of dance in 
societies, past and present. Research methods are 
examined and practiced in short-term projects. 
Through dancing also, students are exposed to 
values that are embodied in dance movement. 
Prerequisite: 272. L. {A} 4 credits 
Yvonne Daniel 
Offered Spring 2004 

377 Advanced Studies in History and 
Aesthetics 

4 credits 

Black Traditions 

MHC (To be announced) 

Offered Fall 2002 

19th Century Dance 

This topic will focus on the characteristics and 
impact of dance in the Romantic Period. Lectures 
are framed from three points of view: the virtuoso 
dancer, the composer, and the performer, since 
there is an intimate interrelationship between mu- 
sic and dance of the period. Students will become 
familiar with 19th century ballets and the musical 
works made for and used in ballet choreogra- 
phies. The prominence of the female ballerina, the 
emergence of the male dancer, and the impact of 
both Fokine and Isadora Duncan are some of the 
topics that will be discussed and analyzed through 
lectures, listening, reading, assignments, and video 
reviews. Prerequisite: DAN 171 or DAN l~l. En- 
rollment limited to 25. (E) {A} 
Julius Robinson 
Offered Spring 2004 



146 



Dana 



Dance and Technology 

Instruction in the creation of computer-generated 
dance choreography and human animation. Move- 
ment and its designed and random relationships 
to time and space will be examined in a digital 
context. Lessons in digital sound editing, and dis- 
cussion centering on concerns with technology 7 in 
the performing arts and its role in reshaping our 
aesthetics in the 21st century will be included. 
L.{A} 

Rodger Blum 
Offered Fall 2002 

400 Special Studies 

For qualified juniors and seniors. A four-credit 
Special Studies is required of senior majors. Ad- 
mission by permission of the instructor and the 
Chair of the Department. Departmental permission 
forms required. {A} 1 to 4 credits 
Members of the Department 
Offered both semesters each year 

Production Courses 

200 Dance Production 

A laboratory course based on the preparation and 
performance of department productions. Students 
may elect to fulfill course requirements from a 
wide array of production related responsibilities, 
including performance, choreography, and stage 
crew. May be taken four times for credit, with a 
maximum of two credits per semester. Orientation 
meeting to be arranged. There will be a general 
meeting for the fall 2002 semester. Attendance is 
mandatory. Consult the department for date and 
time. {A} 1 credit 
Members of the Department 
Offered both semesters each year 



Studio Courses 



Students may repeat studio courses 2 times for 
credit. For a complete list of studio courses of- 
fered on the other four campuses, please consult 
the Five College Dance Department schedule avail- 
able from the Smith dance office. 

Studio courses receive two credits. Preregistra- 
tion for dance technique courses is strongly 



recommended. Enrollment is often limited to 25 
students, and priority is given to seniors and jun- 
iors. Normally, students must take these two-credil 
courses in addition to a full course load. Studio 
courses may also require outside reading, video 
and film viewings, and/or concert attendance. No 
more than 12 credits may be counted toward the 
degree. "P" indicates that permission of the in- 
structor is required. "L" indicates that enrollment 
is limited. Placement will be determined within thf 
first two weeks. 

Repetition of studio courses for credit: The 
Five College Dance Department faculty strongly 
recommends that students in the Five Colleges be 
allowed to take any one level of dance technique 
up to three times for credit, and more with the 
permission of the academic adviser. 






217 Contact Improvisation 

A duet form of movement improvisation. The tech- 
nique will focus on work with gravity, weight sup- 
port, balance, inner sensation and touch, to de- 
velop spontaneous fluidity of movement in relatioi 
to a partner. Prerequisite: at least one previous 
dance technique course or permission of the in- 
structor. Enrollment limited to 20. (E) {A} 
2 credits 

MHC (Wolfeahn), Megan Frazier 
Offered Fall 2002 






218 Floor Barre Movement Technique 

This course combines classical and modern prin 
cipals in a basic series performed on the floor. 
It is designed to help dance students achieve a 
more consistent technical ability through added 
strength, stretch, and development of fluid transi 
tion. Prerequisite: two semesters of ballet or mo( 
ern dance technique. Enrollment limited to 20. 
{A} 2 credits 
Rodger Blum 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

249 The Mindful Body: Resources for 
Performing and Visual Artists 

Development of the ability to make choices and 
find support for artistic technique and expressic 
in dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts, 
through basic anatomical and functional knowl- 
edge of the body from an experiential approach 



ance 



147 



rerequisite: One year of one of the following stu- 
io/performance courses: dance, art, music, Act- 
ig I in theatre, or permission of the instructors, 
ot open to first-year students. Enrollment limited 
> 12. Cannot be repeated for credit. {A} 2 credits 
usan Waltner 
ffered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

techniques 

IODERN 

ltroductory through advanced study of modern 
ance techniques. Central topics include: refining 
inesthetic perception, developing efficient align- 
lent, increasing strength and flexibility, broaden- 
lg the range of movement qualities, exploring 
ew vocabularies and phrasing styles, and encour- 
snng individual investigation and embodiment of 
lovement material. 

13 Modern Dance I 

. {A} 2 credits 

C, MHC, UM, To be announced, Fall 2002 
C, HC, MHC, To be announced, Spring 2003 
'ffered both semesters each year 

14 Modern Dance II 

or students who have taken Modern Dance I or 

le equivalent. L. {A} 2 credits 

C, To be announced 

•ffered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 

15 Modern Dance III 

rerequisite: 1 13 and a minimum of one year of 
lodern dance study. L. {A} 2 credits 
C, HC, MHC, To be announced 
Offered Fall 2002 

16 Modern Dance IV 

udition. Prerequisite: 215. L. {A} 2 credits 
C, HC, MHC, To be announced 
Offered Spring 2003 

117 Modern Dance V 

>y audition/permission only. Prerequisite: 216. 
and P. {A} 2 credits 
iugusto Soledade 
'1HC, To be announced 
)ffered Fall 2002 



318 Modern Dance VI 

Audition required. Prerequisite: 317. L and P. {A} 
2 credits 

Augusto Soledade 
MHC, To be announced 
Offered Spring 2003 

BALLET 

Introductory through advanced study of the prin- 
ciples and vocabularies of classical ballet. Class 
comprises three sections: Barre, Center and Alle- 
gro. Emphasis is placed on correct body align- 
ment, development of whole body movement, mu- 
sicality, and embodiment of performance style. 
Pointe work is included in class and rehearsals at 
the instructor's discretion. 

120 Ballet I 

L. {A} 2 credits 

MHC, UM, To be announced 

Offered both semesters each year 

121 Ballet II 

For students who have taken Ballet I or the equiva- 
lent. L. {A} 2 credits 
To be announced 
Offered both semesters each year 

222 Ballet III 

Prerequisite: 121a or b or permission of the in- 
structor. L. {A} 2 credits 
Rodger Blum 

MHC, UM, To be announced 
Offered Fall 2002 

223 Ballet IV 

L. {A} 2 credits 

Rodger Blum 

MHC, UM, To be announced 

Offered Spring 2003 

324 Ballet V 

By audition/permission only. L. {A} 2 credits 

Rodger Blum 

UM, To be announced 

Offered Fall 2002 



325 Ballet VI 

By audition/permission only. 
To be announced 
Offered Spring 2003 



L. {A} 2 credits 



148 



Danci 



Jazz 

Introductory through advanced jazz dance tech- 
nique, including the study of body isolations, 
movement analysis, syncopation and specific jazz 
dance traditions. Emphasis is placed on enhancing 
musical and rhythmic phrasing, efficient align- 
ment, performance clarity in complex movement 
combinations, and the refinement of performance 
style. 

130 Jazz I 

L. {A} 2 credits 

MHC, To be announced 

Offered both semesters each year 

131 Jazz II 

For students who have taken Jazz I or the equiva- 
lent. L. {A} 2 credits 
To be announced 
Offered both semesters each year 

232 Jazz III 

Further examination of jazz dance principles. L. 

{A} 2 credits 

UM, To be announced 

Offered Fall 2002 

233 Jazz IV 

Emphasis on extended movement phrases, com- 
plex musicality, and development of jazz dance 
styles. L. {A} 2 credits 
UM, To be announced 
Offered Spring 2003 

334 Jazz V 

Advanced principles of jazz dancing. L. By audi- 
tion/permission only. {A} 2 credits 
UM, To be announced 
Offered Fall 2002 

335 Jazz VI 

Advanced principles of jazz dancing. L. By audi- 
tion/permission only. {A} 2 credits 
UM, To be announced 
Offered Spring 2003 

136 Tap I 

Introduction to the basic tap dance steps with gen- 
eral concepts of dance technique. Performance of 



traditional tap step patterns and short combina- 
tions. Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 2 credits 
SC, To be announced, Fall 2002, Spring 2003 
MHC, To be announced, Fall 2002 

Cultural Dance Forms I and II 

Cultural Dance Forms presents differing dance 
traditions from specific geographical regions or 
distinct movement forms that are based on the 
fusion of two or more cultural histories. The form 
include social, concert, theatrical, and ritual 
dance and are framed in the cultural context of 
the identified dance form. These courses vary in 
levels of technique, beginning and intermediate 
(I), and intermediate and advanced (II) and focu 
accordingly on movement fundamentals, integra- 
tion of song and movement, basic through com- 
plex rhythms, perfection of style, ensemble and 
solo performance when applicable. Some classes 
include repertory performance and therefore vary 
in credits. 

142 West African Dance 

This course introduces African dance, music and 
song as a traditional mode of expression in vari- 
ous African countries. It emphasizes appreciation 
and respect for African culture and its profound 
influence on American culture and art. Enrollmer 
limited to 30. {A} 2 credits 
MHC, To be announced 
Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 



142 Comparative Caribbean Dance I 

This course is designed to give flexibility, strength 
and endurance training within Caribbean dance 
styles. It focuses on Katherine Dunham (African- 
Haitian) and Teresa Gonzalez (Cuban) technique 
and includes Haitian, Cuban and Brazilian tradi- 
tional dances. Enrollment limited to 30. {A} 
2 credits 
Yvonne Daniel 
Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 

142 Javanese Dance 

Instruction in the classical dance of Central Java 
The course begins with the basic movement 
vocabulary 7 and proceeds to the study of dance 
repertoires. At the end of the semester an inforr I 
recital will be arranged with the accompammen 



ance 



149 



[]iw gamelan music. Emphasis is on the female 
yle. Enrollment limited to 12. {A} 2 credits 
rip Sri Maeny Sumarsam 
ffered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 



philosophy of movement. The student studies 
selected aspects of human anatomy, physiology, 
bio-mechanics, and their relationships to various 
theories of technical studv. 



"he Major 



dvisers: Rodger Blum, Yvonne Daniel, Augusto 
)ledade, Susan Waltner. 

he dance major at Smith is offered through the 
ve College Dance Department and culminates in 
bachelor of arts degree from Smith College. It is 
esigned to give a student a broad view of dance in 
reparation for a professional career or further 
udy. Students are exposed to courses in dance 
istory and anthropology; creative and aesthetic 
udies, scientific aspects of dance, the language 
f movement (Labanotation and Laban Movement 
nalysis) , and dance technique and performance, 
or studio courses, no more than four courses in 
single idiom will be counted toward the major. 
it least two of these courses must be at the ad- 
lnced level and within the requirements of Em- 
hasislorll (see below).. 

istory Dance in the 20th Century (DAN171) and 
iance and Culture (DAN 272) serve as the intro- 
uction to the major. At the advanced level there is 
le Anthropological Basis of Dance (DAN 375) 
nd more specialized period courses or topics, 
hese courses all examine the dance itself and its 
ultural context. 

ireative and Aesthetic Studies (DAN 151, 

52, 353, and 377) This sequence of courses be- 
ins with the most basic study of dance composi- 
on: space, time, energy, and focuses on tools for 
nding and developing movement. The second 
nd third level courses develop the fundamentals 
f formal choreography and expand work in the 
lanipulation of spatial design, dynamics, phras- 
ig, rhythm, content, and accompaniment. The 
movement materials that a student explores are 
iot limited to any particular style. 

Jcientific Aspects of Dance (DAN 241, 342) 
these courses are designed to develop the 
tudent's personal working process and her 



Language of Movement (DAN 285) Courses in 
this area train students to observe, experience and 
notate qualitative aspects of movement (Laban 
Movement Analysis) and to quantitatively perceive 
and record movement (Labanotation). 

Music for Dancers (DAN 287) Sharpens under- 
standing of music fundamentals and makes these 
applicable to dance. 

Emphasis I: Technique and Performance 

A dancer's instrument is her body and it must be 
trained consistently; Students are encouraged to 
study several dance forms and styles. Students who 
will emphasize performance and choreography 
are expected to reach advanced level in one or 
more forms. Pubic performance, while optional 
and without additional credit, is encouraged to 
realize dance skills before an audience 

Requirements in Technique and Performance 
Emphasis: 

1. 171 and 272 

2. 241 

3. 285 or 287 

4. 151, 200 (2 credits), and 252 

5. Five courses are required in dance technique 
for the major. Students can explore up to four 
courses in a single form. At least two semesters 
must be at the advanced level. A single level of 
technique courses may be taken for credit up 
to three semesters. 

6. Two courses from the following: 309. 342, 
353, 375, 377, 400. 

7. DAN 400 (4 credits) must be taken in the se- 
nior year. 

Emphasis II: Theoretical Practices Dance stu- 
dents may prefer to concentrate on academic ar- 
eas instead of dance performance. These students 
are also encouraged to study several dance forms 
and shies and they are expected to reach interme- 
diate level in one or more forms. 



150 



Dam 



Requirements in Theoretical Practices of 
Dance: 

1. 171 and 272 

2. 241 

3. 285 or 287, or a 200 level course in another 
discipline 

4. 151, 200 (2 credits), and 375 

5. Five technique courses are required in the 
dance theory emphasis of the major. Dance 
Theory students should explore at least two 
courses in two technique forms. Students 
should reach intermediate level in at least one 
form. A single level of technique courses may 
be taken for credit up to three semesters. 

6. T\vo courses from the following: 309, 342, 
377, 400. 

7. DAN 400 (4 credits) must be taken in the se- 
nior vear. 



The Minor 



Advisers: Members of the Smith College Depart- 
ment of Dance. 

Students may fulfill the requirements for the minor 
in dance in either of the following concentrations: 

Minor in Dance with an Emphasis in 
Theatrical Forms 

Requirements: Three core courses: 151, 171, 
and 2 7 2. Three 2-credit studio courses; one in 
dance production: 200; and one other dance 
theory course chosen with the adviser, to fit the 
interests of the students. 

Minor in Dance with an Emphasis in 
Cultural Forms 

Requirements: Three core courses: 151, 272, 
and 3 "5. Three 2-credit studio courses in cultural 
dance forms; one course in dance production: 
200; and one other dance theory course chosen 
with the adviser, to fit the interests of the student. 



Studio Courses: Studio courses receive two crei 
its. Pre-registration for dance technique courses 
strongly recommended. Enrollment is often lim- 
ited to 25 students, and priority is given to junior 
and seniors. Normally students must take partial- 
credit courses in addition to a full-course load. N 
more than 12 credits may be counted toward the 
degree. "P" indicates that permission of the in- 
structor is required. "L" indicates that enrollmen 
is limited. Placement will be determined within tl 
first two weeks of classes. Within limits, students 
may repeat studio courses for credit. 

Studio Courses: 

142 Beginning/Intermediate Cultural Dance Forn 

A. West African 

B. Comparative Caribbean Dance 

C. Cuban 

D. Haitian 

E. Introduction to Flamenco 

F. Javanese 

G. Afro-Brazilian 
H. Middle Eastern 

243 Intermediate/Advanced Cultural Dance Form 

A. West African II 

B. Comparative Caribbean Dance n 

113 Modern Dance I 

114 Modern Dance II 

215 Modern Dance III 

216 Modern Dance IV 

317 Modern Dance V 

318 Modern Dance VI 

120 Ballet I 

121 Ballet II 

222 Ballet III 

223 Ballet IV 

324 Ballet V 

325 Ballet VI 

130 Jazz I 

131 Jazz II 

232 Jazz III 

233 Jazz IV 

334 Jazz V 

335 Jazz VI 

136 Tap I 

137 Tap II 



ance 



151 



lonors 

30d Thesis 

credits 

jII year course; Offered each year 

31 Thesis 

credits 

ffered each Fall 

lve College Courses 

udents should consult the Five College Dance 
epartment course list for Five College course 
ferings. Spring semester course hours will be 
tfed in the Five College Dance Department spring 
'hedule, available at the Smith College Depart- 
ent of Dance office and the Five College Dance 
epartment office. 

dviser: Susan Waltner. 



iraduate: M.F.A. Program 

dviser: Augusto Soledade. 

3 " indicates that permission of the instructor is 
squired. 



10 Theory and Practice of Dance IA 

udio work in dance technique, including mod- 

rn, ballet, tap, cultural dance, and jazz. Eight to 

hours of studio work and weekly seminars. P. 

credits 

ugusto Soledade 

ffered both semesters each year 

20 Theory and Practice of Dance MA 

rudio work in dance technique and weekly semi- 

ars. Prerequisite: 510. P. 5 credits 

ugusto Soledade 

'ffered both semesters each year 

21 Choreography as a Creative Process 

dvanced work in choreographic design and re- 
ited production design. Study of the creative pro- 
ess and how it is manifested in choreography. Pre- 
equisite: two semesters of choreography. 5 credits 
usan Waltner 
Offered Spring 2004 



540 History and Literature of Dance 

Emphasis will include: in-class discussion and 
study of dance history and dance research, current 
research methods in dance, the use of primary 
and secondary source material. Students will com- 
plete a dance history research paper on a topic of 
their choice. Prerequisite: two semesters of dance 
history. 5 credits 
Yvonne Daniel 
Offered Fall 2002 

553 Choreography and Music 

Exploration of the relationship between music and 
dance with attention to the form and content of 
both art forms. Prerequisites: three semesters of 
choreography familiarity with basic music theory, 
and permission of instructor. 5 credits 
To be announced 
Offered Spring 2003 

560 Scientific Principles in the Teaching 
of Dance 

This course is designed to assist graduate students 
as they teach dance technique. The principles of 
anatomy, injury prevention and rehabilitation, and 
nutrition are examined in relation to fundamentals 
of dance pedagogy; expressive dance aesthetics 
are examined formally within a context of current 
body science. Through analysis of body alignment, 
safe and efficient movement patterns, and proper 
nutritional needs, students learn methods that 
increase efficiency, clarity, strength and coordina- 
tion and that ultimately achieve desired aesthetic 
goals. Class work includes lectures, experiential 
application, and computer analyses to reinforce a 
rigorous understanding of the scientific principles 
and body mechanics that are observed within 
dance performance as well as in excellent teach- 
ing of dance. Prerequisite: DAN 24 1 or the equiva- 
lent. {A} 5 credits 
Rodger Blum, Susan Waltner 
Offered Fall 2003 

590 Research and Thesis 

Production project. 

5 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

591 Special Studies 
5 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 



152 Dai 

Other Five College Dance 
Department Courses 

DANCE 316 Contemplative Dance— HC (Lowell) 

Techniques (2 credits) 

UM DANCE 291 Seminar: Yoga, Breath, Flow, 

Presence, Performance (Schwartz) 

Technique and Theory- (4 credits at AC, HC, 

MHC and SC; 3 credits at UM) 

DANCE 153 Dance as an Art Form — 

MHC (Coleman) 

DANCE 261 Introduction to Dance — 

UM (Schwartz) 

HA 294 The Embodied Imagination (Lowell) 

Theory (4 credits at AC, HC, MHC and SC; 

3 credits at UM) 

HA 153 Dance as an Art Form — HC (Nordstrom), 

MHC 

Contemporary Artists Issus — AC (Woodson) , MHC 

Art Criticism — MHC 

Technique (2 credits) 

Technique and Repertory 7 (4 credits at AC, HC, 

MHC, and SC; 3 credits at UM) 

UM DANCE 195R Classical Indian Dance I— 

UM (Devi) 

UM DANCE 295R Classical Indian Dance II— 

UM (Devi) 



153 



East Asian Languages and 
Literatures 

Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



>fessor 

Thomas Rohlich, Ph.D. 

sociate Professors 

Viaki Hirano Hubbard, Ph.D, Chair 

lla M. Varsano, Ph.D. 

sistant Professors 

irdre Sabina Knight, Ph.D. 
iberly Kono, Ph.D. 



Lecturers 

Megumi Oyama, M.A. 
Ling Zhao, M.A. 
Yoon-Suk Chung, Ph.D. 
Alice Kao, M.A. 

Assistant 

Suk Massey, M.A. 

Teaching Assistants 
Weijia Li, M.Ed. 
JinBae Hong, M.A. 



2 Department of East Asian Languages and Lit- 
itures offers a Major in East Asian Languages 
i Cultures with concentrations in China or Ja- 
1, and a Minor in East Asian Languages and 
mature with concentrations in China, Japan, or 
rea. Students planning on spending their junior 
ir abroad should consult the department con- 
•ning the list of courses to be credited toward 
i major or minor and must seek final approval 
the courses upon their return. 

ourses in English 

1 100 The Literary Traditions of East Asia: 
ina, Japan, and Korea 

introduction to classics of East Asian literature 
m pre-modern times to the present. This 
urse examines canon formation, traditional 
sthetics and the historical, religious and philo- 
phical groundings of the literary traditions. Texts 
be read include selections from major works of 
etry, prose, and drama principally from China 
d Japan, and, to a lesser degree, Korea. All read- 
$ are in English translation. Enrollment limited 



to 20. Preference given to entering first-year stu- 
dents. Wl {L} 4 credits 
Kimberly Kono, Fall 2002 
Sabina Knight, Fall 2003 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

EAL 231 The Culture of the Lyric in 
Traditional China 

This course surveys the masterworks of the Chi- 
nese lyric tradition from its oral beginnings in pre- 
Confucian times through the eve of the founding of 
the Republic of China. Through the careful reading 
of selected works including shaman's hymns, pro- 
test poetry; and excerpts from the great novels, 
students will inquire into how the spiritual, philo- 
sophical and political concerns dominating the 
poets' milieu shaped the lyric language through 
the ages. No knowledge of Chinese language or 
literature is required. (E) {L} 4 credits 
Paula Varsano 
Offered Fall 2002 

EAL 232 Modern Chinese Literature 

Selected readings in translation of twentieth-cen- 
tury Chinese literature from the late-Qing dynasty 



154 



East Asian Languages and Literatun 



to contemporary Taiwan and the People's Republic 
of China. This course will offer (1) a window on 
twentieth-century China (from the Sino-Japanese 
War of 1895 to the present) and (2) an introduc- 
tion to the study of literature: (a) why we read 
literature, (b) different approaches (e.g., how to 
do a close reading), and (c) literary movements. 
We will stress the socio-political context and ques- 
tions of political engagement, social justice, class, 
gender, race and human rights. All readings are in 
English translation and no background in China or 
Chinese is required. {L} 4 credits 
Sabina Knight 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

EAL 235 How Poems Mean In China and 
the West 

"Words do not convey meaning" — a dictum as 
valid for Confucians as it was for Taoists and Bud- 
dhists. How, then, did poetry maintain its status as 
the most respected form of artistic expression in 
China for at least three thousand years? Through a 
comparative study of poetic theory and practice in 
traditional Chinese and European literatures, stu- 
dents will hone their ability to read poetry across 
cultures by considering the following questions: 
What are the myths of poetic creation and how do 
they reflect and influence the reading, writing and 
criticism of poetry over time? How do these cul- 
tures construct the link between words and mean- 
ing? What constitutes a "good" poem in East and 
West, and do those qualities survive translation? 
(E) {L} 4 credits 
Paula Varsano 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

EAL 236 Modernity: East and West 

What can the project of modernity, particularly the 
Enlightenment concern for human rights, mean 
for Chinese writers and for us today? How can we 
understand current struggles for human rights in 
terms of the different directions modernity and its 
critique have taken in Europe, Japan and China? 
We will read selections from European and East 
Asian philosophers before examining the influx of 
Western theories of modernity and comparing 
histories of modern imperialism, ideas of national 
culture, and literature's function in nationalist 
movements. Close readings of 20th-century Chi- 
nese fiction and film will focus on questions of 



alienation and social responsibility. Writers such 
as Kant, Marx, Woolf, Soseki, Tanizaki, Lu Xun an 
Mo Yan. {L} 4 credits 
Sabina Knight 
Offered Fall 2003 

EAL 240 Japanese Language and Culture 

This course is designed to enhance students' 
knowledge and understanding of the Japanese 
language by relating linguistic, social, and histori 
cal aspects of Japanese culture as well as the Japs 
nese perception of the dynamic of human interac 
tions. Starting with a brief review of structural an 
cultural characteristics of the language, we will 
move on to examine predominant beliefs about 
the relationship between Japanese language and 
cultural or interpersonal perceptions, including 
politeness and gender. Basic knowledge of Japa- 
nese is desirable. All readings are in English tran 
lation. {S} 4 credits 
Maki Hubbard 
Offered Spring 2003 

EAL 241 Court Ladies, Wandering Monks, 
and Urban Rakes: Literature and Culture in 
Premodern Japan 

A study of Japanese literature and its cultural roo 
from the 8th to the 19th century. The course will 
focus on enduring works of the Japanese literary 
tradition, along with the social and cultural cond 
tions that gave birth to the literature. All reading* 
are in English translation. {L} 4 credits 
Thomas Rohlich 
Offered Fall 2003 

EAL 242 Modern Japanese Literature 

Selected readings in translation of Japanese liter 
ture from the Meiji period to the present. In the 
past 150 years Japan has undergone tremendou 
change: rapid industrialization, imperial and co. 
nial expansion, occupation following its defeat i 
the Pacific War, and emergence as a global eco- 
nomic power. The literature of modern Japan re 
fleets the complex aesthetic, cultural and politic 
effects of such changes. Through our discussior 
of these texts, we will also address theoretical 
questions about such concepts as identity, gend 
race, sexuality, nation, class, colonialism, mode 
ism and translation. Readings will include wort 
by Natsume Soseki, Higuchi Ichiyo, Tanizaki 






it Asian Languages and Literatures 



155 



l'ichiro, Enchi Fumiko, and 6e Kenzaburo. All 
idings are in English translation. {L} 4 credits 
nberly Kono 
fered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

L 243 Japanese Poetry in Cultural Context 

tudy of Japanese poetry from earliest times to 
modern era, focussing on the two major verse 
ms, the thirty-one-syllable waka and the seven- 
n-syllable haiku. The tradition of poetry in Ja- 
n reaches back over a thousand years, with its 
t appearance as sacred songs in national myths 
d histories. Relatively uncomplicated in form, 
>anese poetry has long been practiced by people 
all social classes and occupations: court nobles 
d ladies, wandering Buddhist monks, profes- 
nal haiku masters, and in modern times every- 
e from high school students to housewives and 
sinessmen. This course will examine the formal 
d social characteristics of Japanese poetry; with 
rticular attention to how it responded to chang- 
historical and cultural circumstances. Taught 
English, with no Japanese required. {L} 
redits 

omas Rohlich 
fered Spring 2004 

\L 244 Construction of Gender in Modern 
panese Women's Writing. 

is course will focus on the construction of gen- 
r in the writings of Japanese women from the 
id- 19th century until the present. How does the 
iistence of a "feminine literary tradition" in 
|emodern Japan influence the writing of women 
| ring the modern period? How do these texts 
fleet, resist, and reconfigure conventional repre- 
atations of gender? We will explore the possibili- 
s and limits of the articulation of feminine and 
ninist subjectivities, as well as investigate the 
oduction of such categories as race, class, and 
mality in relation to gender and each other, 
•adings will include short stories and novels by 
ch writers as Higuchi Ichiyo, Hayashi Fumiko, 
•no Taeko, Yoshimoto Banana and Yamada Amy. 
uglit in English, with no knowledge of Japanese 
quired. (E) {L} 4 credits 
tnberly Kono 
fered Fall 2002 



EAL 245 Writing the "Other" in Modern 
Japanese Literature 

A study of representations of "foreign" cultures in 
Japanese literary and cinematic production of 
Japan's modern period, from the mid 19th century 
until the present. How was (and is) Japan's iden- 
tity as a modern nation configured through repre- 
sentations of "others"? How are categories of race, 
gender, nationality, class and sexuality used in the 
construction of "otherness"? We will consider the 
development of modern Japanese national and 
individual identities as well as explore issues of 
travel, colonialism, immigration, and military oc- 
cupation. Assigned texts include literary works by 
Natsume Soseki, Tanizaki Jun'ichiro, Yosano Akiko 
and Hayashi Kyoto, and Lee Yangji as well as criti- 
cal articles by Edward Said, Mary Louise Pratt, and 
Lisa Lowe. All readings are in English translation. 
{L} 4 credits 
Kimberly Kono 
Offered Spring 2004 

EAL 261 Major Themes in Literature: East- 
West Perspectives 

{L} 4 credits 

Gendered Fate 

Is fate indifferent along lines of gender? What (and 
whose) interests are served by appeals to destiny? 
Close readings of women's narratives of desire, 
courtship, sexuality, prostitution and rape will 
explore how belief in inevitability mystifies the 
gender-based oppression of social practices and 
institutions. Are love, marriage and mothering 
biological imperatives? What are love, seduction 
and desire if not freely chosen? Or is freely chosen 
love merely a Western ideal? How might women 
write to overcome fatalistic discourses that shape 
the construction of female subjectivity* and agency? 
Works by Simone de Beauvoir, Hayashi Fumiko. 
Hong Ying, Nadine Gordimer, Toni Morrison, and 
Wang Anyi. All readings in English translation. 
Sabina Knight 
Offered Fall 2002 

EAL 360 Seminar: Topics in East Asian 
Languages and Literatures 

4 credits 



156 



East Asian Languages and Literatim 



The Tale of Genji and Its Legacy 
The seminar will begin with a reading and study of 
The Tale of the Genji, one of the greatest works of 
Japanese literature. We will look at the cultural 
and societal milieu of the author, as well as the 
textual features that mark it as an icon of Japanese 
culture today. We will also look at ways in which 
the Genji is represented in later texts — plays, 
parodies, and modern short stories and novels — 
as a way of examining both the question of influ- 
ence and the role that the Genji plays in the litera- 
ture of later generations. All readings are in En- 
glish translation. {L} 
Thomas Rohlich 
Offered Fall 2002 

Contemporary Chinese Women's Fiction 
Close readings of post-1976 short stories, novellas 
and novels by women in the People's Republic of 
China. How do these works contend with legacies 
of political trauma and the social consequences of 
economic restructuring? How do quests for self- 
realization or social recognition relate to specific 
ethical commitments and struggles for social 
change? How do stories about extramarital affairs, 
serial sexual relations or love between women 
reinforce or contest imperatives of political, cul- 
tural and sexual citizenship? Works by Chen Ran, 
Dai Homing, Hong Ying, Wang Anyi, Wei Hui and 
Zhang Jie. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
{L} 

Sabina Knight 
Offered Spring 2003 

Poetics of Travel and Metaphors of Space: 
Chinese Travel Literature from a Comparative 
Perspective 

Much of Chinese literature — traditional and mod- 
ern, poetic and narrative — is composed from the 
perspective of one who is, or has been, "on the 
road": whether as exile, pilgrim, soldier, pleasure 
traveler, or even shaman. Through a close reading 
of selected poems, diary entries, essays, and fic- 
tional writings selected from across the centuries, 
students will consider the philosophical, spiritual 
and political implications of how various writers 
define such notions as "place," "home," and "wil- 
derness." Our reading of Chinese literary texts will 
be supplemented by a range of selections from the 



Japanese and Western traditions. No knowledge c 
Chinese is required, and all readings will be in 
translation. However, qualified students will be 
provided with original texts and an opportunity tc 
discuss those texts on a regular basis. {L} 
Paula Varsano 
Offered Spring 2004 

East Asian Language 
Courses 

A language placement test is required prior to 
registration for students who have previously stuc 
ied the language. 

Chinese Language 

CHI 110 Chinese I (Intensive) 

An intensive introduction to spoken Mandarin an 
modern written Chinese, presenting basic ele- 
ments of grammar, sentence structures and activt 
mastery of the most commonly used Chinese chaj 
acters. Emphasis on development of oral/aural 
proficiency, pronunciation, and the acquisition of 
skills in reading and writing Chinese characters. 
{F} 5 credits 
Sections as follows: 
Sabina Knight Alice Kao, Fall 2002 
Paula Varsano, Ling Zhao, Fall 2003 
Offered each Fall 

CHI 111 Chinese I (Intensive) 

A continuation of 110. Prerequisite: CHI 110 or 
permission of the instructor. {F} 5 credits 
Paula Varsano, Ling Zhao, Spring 2003 
Sabina Knight, To be announced, Spring 2004 
Offered each Spring 

CHI 220 Chinese II (Intensive) 

Continued emphasis on the development of oral 
proficiency and functional literacy in modern 
Mandarin. Conversation and narrative practice, 
reading exercises, short composition assignmei , 
and work with audio-visual materials. Prerequi 
site: 1 1 1 or permission of the instructor. {F} 
5 credits 

LingZbao, Fall 2002 
Offered each Fall 



iaii Languages and Literatures 



157 



11 221 Chinese II (Intensive) 

zontinuation of 220. Prerequisite: CHI 220 or 
tanission of the instructor. {F} 5 credits 
'ce Kao, Spring 2003 
fered each Spring 

41 301 Chinese III 

lilding on the skills and vocabulary acquired in 
dnese II, students will learn to read simple es- 
ys on topics of common interest, and will de- 
lop the ability to understand, summarize and 
icuss social issues in contemporary China, 
'adings will be supplemented by audio-visual 
aterials. Prerequisite: 221 or permission of the 
structor. {F} 4 credits 
ice Kao, Fall 2002 
fered each Fall 

HI 302 Chinese III 

traduction to the use of authentic written and 
;ual documents commonly encountered in China 
day, with an emphasis on television news broad- 
sts and newspaper articles. Exercises in compo- 
ion as well as oral presentations will comple- 
ent daily practice in reading and listening com- 
ehension. Prerequisite: 301 or permission of the 
structor. {F} 4 credits 
ngZhao, Spring 2003 
ffered each Spring 

HI 310 Readings in Classical Chinese Prose 
id Poetry 

lis course introduces students to the language of 
una's ancient and medieval literary, philosophi- 
d and historical writings. Knowledge of Classical 
tinese also greatly enhances the appreciation of 
e Japanese classics, as well as the Chinese mod- 
n texts, from newspaper articles to contempo- 
iry music lyric, poetry, and fiction. Students will 
arn this particular art of reading through direct 
^counters with some of China's most beautiful 
id influential writings, including the Daodejing, 
e Confucian Analects, the Mencius, the selec- 
ts of Tang poetry. Prerequisites: CHI 221, JPN 
32, KOR 302 or permission of the instructor. {F} 
credits 

aula Varsano, /M 2002 
ffered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 



CHI 350 Advanced Readings in Chinese: 
Modern Literary Texts 

Development of advanced oral and reading profi- 
ciency through the study and discussion of se- 
lected modern Chinese literary texts. Students will 
explore literary expression in original works of 
fiction, including short stories, essays, novellas, 
and excerpts of novels. Prerequisite: 302 or per- 
mission of the instructor. {L/F} 4 credits 
Ling Zhao, Fall 2002 
Offered each Fall 

CHI 351 Advanced Readings in Chinese: 
Modern and Contemporary Texts 

In contrast with CHI 350, this course focuses on 
readings of political and social import. Through 
the in-depth study and discussion of essays drawn 
from a variety of sources, students will increase 
their understanding of modern and contemporary 
China. Prerequisite: 302 or permission of the in- 
structor. {L/F} 4 credits 
Alice Kao, Spring 2003 
Offered each Spring 

Japanese Language 

JPN 110 Japanese I (Intensive) 

An introduction to spoken and written Japanese. 
Emphasis on the development of basic oral profi- 
ciency, along with reading and writing skills. Stu- 
dents will acquire knowledge of basic grammatical 
patterns, strategies in daily communication, 
hiragana, katakana, and about 300 Kanji. De- 
signed for students with no background in Japa- 
nese. {F} 5 credits 
MakiHubbard,m2001 
Offered each Fall 

JPN 111 Japanese I (Intensive) 

A continuation of 1 10. Prerequisite: JPN 1 10 or 
permission of the instructor. {F} 5 credits 
Maki Hubbard. Kimberly Kono, Spring 2003 
Offered each Spring 

JPN 220 Japanese II (Intensive) 

Course focuses on further development of oral 
proficiency, along with reading and writing skills. 
Students will attain intermediate proficiency while 
deepening their understanding of the social and 
cultural context of the language. Prerequisite: 1 1 1 
or permission of the instructor. {F} 5 credits 



158 



East Asian Languages and Literatun 



Megumi Oyama. Fall 2002 
Offered each Fall 

JPN 221 Japanese II (Intensive) 

A continuation of 220. Prerequisite: JPN 220 or 
permission of the instructor. {F} 5 credits 
Megumi Oyama. Spring 2003 
Offered each Spring 

JPN 301 Japanese III 

Development of high intermediate proficiency in 
speech and reading through study of varied prose 
pieces and audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: 
221 or permission of the instructor. {F} -t credits 
Megumi Oyama, Fall 2002 
Offered each Fall 



KOR 220 Korean II (Intensive) 

This intensive course places equal emphasis on 
oral/aural proficiency, grammar, and reading anc 
writing skills. Various aspects of Korean society 
and culmre are presented with weekly visual mat 
rials. Basic Chinese characters are introduced. 
Prerequisite: 1 1 1 or permission of the instructor. 
{F} 5 credits 

Yoon-Suk Chung. Fall 2002 
Offered each Fall 

KOR 221 Korean II (Intensive) 

A continuation of 220. Prerequisite: 220 or per- 
mission of the instructor. {F} 5 credits 
Yoon-Suk Chung, Spring 2003 
Offered each Spring 



JPN 302 Japanese III 

A continuation of 301. Prerequisite: 301 or per- 
mission of the instructor. {F} 4 credits 
Megumi Oyama, Spring 2003 
Offered each Spring 

JPN 350 Contemporary Texts 

Study of selected contemporary texts including 
literature and journalism from print and elec- 
tronic media. Focus will be on developing reading 
and discussion skills in Japanese using original 
materials, and on understanding various aspects of 
modem Japan through its contemporary texts. 
Prerequisite: JPN 302 or permission of the instruc- 
tor. {F} -t credits 
Thomas Rohlich 
Offered Fall 2002 

Korean Language 

KOR 110 Korean I (Intensive) 

An intensive introduction to spoken and written 
Korean. Emphasis on oral proficiency with the 
acquisition of basic grammar, reading and writing 
skills. This course is designed for students with 
little or no background in Korean. {F} 5 credits 
Yoon-Suk Chung, Fall 2002 
Offered each Fall 

KOR 111 Korean I (Intensive) 

A continuation of 1 10. Prerequisite: 1 10 or per- 
mission of the instructor. {F} 5 credits 
Yoon-Suk Chung, Spring 2003 
Offered each Spring 



KOR 301 Korean III 

Continued development of speaking, listening, 
reading, and writing, with more advanced gram- 
matical points and vocabulary. Korean proverbs 
and intermediate Chinese characters are intro- 
duced. Prerequisite: 221 or permission of the 
instructor. {F} 4 credits 
SukMassey, Fall 2002 
Offered each Fall 

KOR 302 Korean III 

A continuation of 301. Prerequisite: 301 or per- 
mission of the instructor. {F} 4 credits 
Suk Massey, Spring 2003 
Offered each Spring 

KOR 350 Advanced Studies in Korean 
Language and Society 

This course is designed to provide students with 
thorough grounding in advanced reading, writir 
and speaking skills in Korean to lay a firm fornu 
tion for the clear understanding of Korean con- 
temporary culmre. Selected current issues in K( 
rean society and culmre will be addressed, and 
wide range of print and non-print materials will 
covered Texts are all in Korean with advanced 
Chinese characters. Prerequisite: 302 or permi 
sion of the instructor. {F} 4 credits 
SukMassey, Fall 2002 
Offered each Fall 



KOR 351 Advanced Readings in Korean 
Language and Literature 

This course further develops advanced reading 



i 



;ian Languages and Literatures 



159 



pting and speaking skills through original liter- 
, texts in Korean. Students will read a wide se- 
ptan of the most representative modern Korean 
[?rary works (including short stories, novellas, 
>cerpts of novels, essays, poetry, and plays) by 
•11-known Korean writers. Class will be con- 
cted in Korean. Prerequisite: 302 or permission 
ithe instructor. {F} 4 credits 
on -Sit k Chung, Spring 2003 
fered each Spring 

iL 400 Special Studies 

r students engaged in independent projects or 
>earch in connection with Japanese, Chinese, or 
rean language and literature. 2 to 4 credits 
fered both semesters each year 

ie Major in East Asian Languages 
id Cultures 

erequisites 

e first year of Chinese (CHI 1 10 and 1 1 1) or 
3anese (JPN 1 10 and 1 1 1) is a prerequisite for 
mission to the major. A language placement test 
required prior to registration for students who 
ve previously studied the language. 

Jvisers: Members of the Department. 

iquirements: A total of 11 courses (46 credits), 
• more than five of which shall be taken in other 
stitutions, including the Five Colleges, Junior 
ar Abroad programs, or summer programs, 
jdents should consult their advisers prior to 
king such courses. S/U grading options are not 
lowed for courses counting toward the major, 
udents are expected to concentrate in Chinese or 
panese language. 

Basis: Three required courses (14 credits) 

a. EAL 100 (The Literary Tradition of East 
Asia: China, Japan and Korea [in English 
translation]) (1 course); 

b. Second-year language courses: JPN 220 
and 22l'or CHI 220 and 221 (2 courses); 

Third-year language courses (8 credits): JPN 
)1 and 302, or CHI 301 and 302 (2 courses), 
udents whose proficiency places them beyond 
ie third year should substitute advanced language 
r literature courses for this requirement. 



3. Six additional courses (24 credits), at least 3 
of which must be EAL courses on the literature or 
culture of the country of the student's concentra- 
tion. The three remaining courses may be chosen 
from other courses in the department, or, at the 
recommendation of the adviser, related courses in 
other departments. Courses in Junior Year Abroad 
Programs and Five College Programs may also be 
counted, with the approval of the adviser, within 
the limits specified above. Some courses that treat 
topics on more than one country (such as courses 
that focus on both China and Japan) may be eli- 
gible, but they must be approved by the adviser. 

One of the six courses should be a departmental 
seminar in the student's area of interest. In certain 
cases, particularly when a seminar in the student's 
areas of interest is not available, the student may 
enroll, with permission of the adviser and instruc- 
tor, in a colloquium or a 200-level course in which 
the student will write a seminar paper. 

Advanced Language Courses: 

CHI 3 1 Readings in Classical Chinese Prose 

and Poetry 
CHI 350 Advanced Readings in Chinese: 

Modern Literary Texts 
CHI 35 1 Advanced Readings in Chinese: 

Modern and Contemporary Texts 
JPN 350 Contemporary Texts 
KOR 350 Advanced Studies in Korean 

Language and Society 
KOR 351 Advanced Readings in Korean 

Language and Literature 



Courses 
EAL 231 

EAL 232 
EAL 233 

EAL 235 
EAL 236 
EAL 240 
EAL 241 



EAL 242 
EAL 243 
EAL 244 



taught in English: 

The Culture of the Lyric in Traditional 

China 

Modern Chinese Literature 

The Chinese Literary Tradition 

(Topic course) 

How Poems Mean in China and the West 

Modernity: East and West 

Japanese Language and Culture 

Court Ladies, Wandering Monks, and 

Urban Rakes: Literature and Culture in 

Premodern Japan 

Modern Japanese Literature 

Japanese Poetry in Cultural Context 

Construction of Gender in Modern 

Japanese Women's Writing 



160 



East Asian Languages and Literature 



EAL 245 Writing the "Other" in Modern 
Japanese Literature 

EAL 261 Major Themes in Literature: East- West 
Perspectives (topic course) 

EAL 360 Seminar: Topics in East Asian Lan- 
guages and Literatures (topic course) 



Honors 


LinL, 1W 


Director: Maki Hubbard 


EAL 231 


430d Thesis 

(8 credits) 


EAL 232 
EAL 233 


Full year course; Offered each year 


EAL 235 


431 Thesis 
8 credits 
Offered each Fall 


EAL 236 
EAL 240 
EAL 241 


Requirements: same as for the departmental 
major plus the thesis, normally written in both 
semesters of the senior year (430d) , with an oral 


EAL 242 
EAL 243 
EAL 244 



examination on the thesis. In special cases, the 
thesis may be written in the first semester of the 
senior year (431). 

The Minor in East Asian 
Languages and Literatures 

Advisers: Members of the Department. 

The course requirements are designed so that a 
student will concentrate on one of the East Asian 
languages, but will have the option of being ex- 
posed to the other courses in the department. 

Prerequisites: 

The first year of Chinese (CHI 1 10 and 1 1 1) , 
Japanese (JPN 1 10 and 1 1 1), or Korean (KOR 
1 10 and 1 1 1) is a prerequisite for admission. 

Requirements: 

A total of six courses (24 credits) in the follow- 
ing distribution, no more than three of which 
shall be taken in other institutions. Students 
should consult the department prior to taking 
courses in other institutions. 



1. Chinese II (CHI 220 and 221), Japanese II 
(JPN 220 and 221), or Korean II (KOR 220 
and 221). 

2. Four courses, at least two of which must be 
EAL courses, chosen from the following: 



The Literary Traditions of East Asia: 

China, Japan, and Korea 

The Culture of the Lyric in Traditional 

China 

Modern Chinese Literature 

The Chinese Literary Tradition 

(topic course) 

How Poems Mean in China and the We 

Modernity: East and West 

Japanese Language and Culture 

Court Ladies, Wandering Monks, and 

Urban Rakes: Literature and Culture 

in Premodern Japan. 

Modern Japanese Literature 

Japanese Poetry in Cultural Context 

Construction of Gender in Modern 

Japanese Women's Writing 

Writing the "Other" in Modern 

Japanese Literature 

Major Themes in Literature 

(topic course) 

Seminar: Topics in East Asian 

Languages and Literatures 

Special Studies 

Chinese III 

Chinese III (A continuation of 301) 

Readings in Classical Chinese Prose 

and Poetry 

Advanced Readings in Chinese: 

Modern Literary Texts 

Advanced Readings in Chinese: 

Modern and Contemporary Society 

Japanese III 

Japanese III (A continuation of 301) 

Contemporary Texts 

Korean III 

Korean III (A continuation of 301) 

Advanced Studies in Korean 

Language and Society 

Advanced Readings in Korean 

Language and Literature 



EAL 245 

EAL 261 

EAL 360 

EAL 400 
CHI 301 
CHI 302 
CHI 310 

CHI 350 

CHI 351 

JPN 301 
JPN 302 
JPN 350 
KOR 301 
KOR 302 
KOR 350 

KOR 351 



161 



East Asian Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



st Asian Studies Advisory Committee 

Daniel K. Gardner. Professor of History 
•rylin Rhie, Professor of Art and of East Asian 

Studies 

Peter Gregory, Professor of Religion and of East 

Asian Studies 

nnis Yasutomo, Professor of Government, 

Director 

Robert Eskildsen, Assistant Professor of History 

zanne Zhang-Gottschang, Assistant Professor of 

East Asian Studies and Anthropology 
ula Varsano, Associate Professor of East Asian 

Languages and Literatures 



Participating Faculty 

**'Steven M. Goldstein, Professor of Government 
Jamie Hubbard, Yehan Numata Lecturer in 

Buddhist Studies 
t ' Maki Hirano Hubbard, Associate Professor of 

East Asian Languages and Literatures 
Deirdre Sabina Knight, Assistant Professor of East 

Asian Languages and Literatures 
Kimberly Kono, Assistant Professor of East Asian 

Languages and Literatures 
**' Thomas Rohlich, Professor of East Asian 

Languages and Literatures 
Patrick Shorb, Instructor in History 



le Major 



e Major in East Asian Studies offers students an 
portunity to develop a coherent and compre- 
nsive understanding of the great civilizations of 
! Asia Pacific region. The study of East Asia 
wild be considered an integral part of a liberal 
s education. Through an interdisciplinary study 
these diverse cultures, students engage in a 
mparative study of their own societies and val- 
s. The Major also reflects the emergence of East 
ia politically, economically, and culturally onto 
i world scene especially during the last century 
d anticipates the continued importance of the 
£on in the future. It therefore helps prepare 
idents for post-graduation endeavors ranging 
>m graduate training to careers in both the pub- 
and private sectors dealing with East Asia. 

equirements for the Major 

isis Courses: 

i An East Asian Language: The second year of an 
; East Asian language, which can be fulfilled by 
Chinese 220d, Japanese 220d, or Korean 220d 
or higher level courses. Extensive language 



study is encouraged, but only two courses at 
the second-year level or higher will count to- 
ward the Major. Students with native or near- 
native fluency in an East Asian language must 
take a second East Asian language. Native and 
near-native fluency is defined as competence 
in the language above the fourth-year level. 

2) Survey Courses 

a) One survey course on the pre-modern civi- 
lization of an East Asian country: HST 211, 
HST212,orHST220 

b) One survey course on modern East Asia: 
HST 221, ANT 252, or ANT 253 

Note: Basis courses must cover more than one 
East Asian country 

Electives (6 courses) 

1) Six elective courses, which shall normally be 
determined in consultation with the adviser 
from the list of approved courses, 
a) Four of the elective courses shall constitute 
an area of concentration, which can be an 
emphasis on the civilization of one country 
(China, Japan, or Korea) or a thematic 
concentration (for example, the Confucian 



162 



East Asian Studi 



tradition, the Buddhist legacy, gender, im- 
perialism, thought and art, political 
economy, international relations, etc.) 

b) Electives must include courses in both the 
Humanities and Social Sciences 

c) Electives must include courses on more 
than one East Asian country 

d) One of the elective courses must be a Smith 
seminar 

e) At least half of course credits toward the 
Major must be taken at Smith. 

2) Smith courses not included on the approved 
list may count toward the Major under the 
following conditions: 

a) The course has a substantial East Asian 
component suitable for a comparative study 
of East Asia 

b) The student obtains the approval of the East 
Asian Studies Advisory Committee 

c) No more than one such course shall be 
applied toward the Major. 

3) A student may honor in East Asian Studies (EAS 
430d). Honors requires a 3-0 GPA overall and 
3.3 GPA in the Major. The Honors thesis may 
substitute for the seminar requirement. 

4) Junior Year Abroad programs are encouraged at 
College approved institutions in East Asia. EAS 
recommends the Associated Kyoto Program for 
Japan, ACC for China, and Ewha Women's Uni- 
versity for Korea. Courses taken at JY\ pro- 
grams, as well as courses taken away from 
Smith at other institutions, may count toward 
the major under the following conditions: 

a) The courses are reviewed and approved by 
the East Asian Studies Advisory 7 Committee 
upon completion. 

b) Courses taken away from Smith must not 
total more than half of the credits counted 
toward the Major. 

Advisers: Robert Eskildsen, Daniel K. Gardner, 
Peter Gregory, Marylin Rhie. Dennis Yasutomo, 
Paula Varsano, Suzanne Zhang-Gottschang. 

EAS 218 (C) Thought and Art in China 
{H/A} 4 credits 

Daniel Gardner Marylin Rhie (Art and East 
Asian Studies) 



Topic: Medieval Thought and Art 
A survey of medieval Chinese thought and its ex- 
pression in the visual arts during the Tang and 
Sung dynasties ("th-13th c). Open to first-year 
students by permission of the instructors only. 
{H/A} 4 credits 

Daniel Gardner Marylin Rhie (Art and East 
Asian Studies) 
Offered Spring 2003 

EAS 270 Colloquium in East Asian Studies 

Topic: Art of Korea. Architecture, sculpture, 
painting and ceramic art of Korea from 
Neolithic times to the 18th century. 
{H/A} 4 credits 

Marylyn Rhie, (Art and East Asian Studies) 
Offered Fall 2002 

EAS 375 Seminar: Japan-United States 
Relations 

.Analysis of political, economic, cultural, and raci 
roots of U.S.-Japan relations from the 19th centu 
to the present. Emphasis on current mutual per- 
ceptions and their potential impact on future bils 
eral relations. Enrollment limited to 20. {S} 
4 credits 

Dennis Yasutomo 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 






EAS 404 Special Studies 

4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

EAS 408d Special Studies 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

EAS 430d Honors Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

Basis Courses 

ANT 252 The City and the Countryside in 
China 

{S} -i credits 

Suzanne Zhang-Gottschang 

Offered Fall 2004 



ail Studies 



163 



IT 253 Introduction to East Asian Societies 


EAL242 


id Cultures 


EAL243 


• {S} 4 credits 


EAL244 


rcuuie Zhang-Gottschang 




lered Fall 2002 


EAL245 


IT 211 (L) The Emergence of China 


EAL251 


\ 4 credits 


EAL252 


niel Gardner 


EAL261 


: ered Fall 2002 






EAL360 


T 212 (L) China in Transformation, 




). 700—1900 


EAS270 


\ 4 credits 


EAS279 


niel Gardner 




ered Spring 2003 


HST218 




REL110 


T 220 (L) Japan from Ancient Times to the 


REL272 


th Century 


REL273 


} 4 credits 


REL279 


Serf Eskildsen 


REL280 


fered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 


REL282 



T221(L) Modern Japan 
\ 4 credits 

trick Shork Robert Eskildsen 
fered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

Dproved Courses in the 
umanities 



H 101 

H120 
H222 
H224 
L100 

L231 

L2M 
1233 

1235 

1236 
1240 
JL 241 



Buddhist Art 

Introduction to Art History: Asia 

The Art of China 

The Art of Japan 

The Literary Tradition of East Asia: 

China, Japan, and Korea 

The Culture of the Lyric in Traditional 

China 

Modern Chinese Literature 

The Literary Tradition: The Evolution of 

Chinese Fiction 

Mimesis, Metaphor, and Ineffability: 

How Poems Mean in China and the West 

Modernity: East and West 

Japanese Language and Culture 

Traditional Japanese Literature in 

Translation 



Modern Japanese Literamre 

Japanese Poetry in Cultural Context 

Construction of Gender in Modern 

Japanese Women's Writing 

Writing the 'Other'" in Modern Japanese 

Literature 

Modern Korean Literamre 

The Korean Literary Tradition 

Major Themes in Literamre: East-West 

Perspectives 

Seminar: Topics in East Asian Languages 

and Literatures 

Colloquium in East Asian Studies 

Colloquium: The Art and Culture of 

Tibet 

Thought and Art in China 

Politics of Enlightenment 

Buddhist Thought 

Colloquium in East Asian Religions 

Colloquium in Buddhist Studies 

Japanese Buddhism 

Violence and Non-Violence in Religious 

Traditions of South Asia. 



Approved Courses in the 
Social Sciences 



ANT 251 
ANT 252 
ANT 253 

ANT 342 
EAS279 

EAS375 
GOV 228 
GOV 230 
GOV 251 

GOV 344 

GOV 348 

HST211 
HST212 
HST213 



HST218 



Women and Modernity in East Asia 
The City and the Countryside in China 
Introduction to East Asian Societies and 
Culture 

Seminar: Topics in Anthropology 
Colloquium: The Art and Culture of 
Tibet 

Seminar: Japan-United States Relations 
The Government and Politics of Japan 
The Government and Politics of China 
Foreign Poliq of Japan 
Seminar on Foreign Policy of the 
Chinese People's Republic 
Seminar in International Politics: 
Conflict and Cooperation in Asia 
The Emergence of China 
China in Transformation 
Aspects of East Asian History: Knowl- 
edge, Power, and the Arts in Imperial 
China 
Thought and Art in China 



164 East Asian Stu 

HST219 Modern Korea 

HST 220 Japan from Ancient Times to the 18th 

Century 
HST 221 Modern Japan 
HST 222 Aspects of Japanese History 
HST 292 The 19th Century Crisis in East Asia 



The Minor 



The interdepartmental Minor in East Asian Studies 
is a program of study designed to provide a coher- 
ent understanding of and basic competence in the 
civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea. It may be 
undertaken in order to broaden the scope of any 
major; to acquire, for comparative purposes, an 
Asian perspective within any of the humanistic and 
social-scientific disciplines; or as the basis of fu- 
ture graduate work and/or careers related to East 
Asia. 

Requirements: The minor will consist of a total of 
six courses, no more than three of which shall be 
taken at other institutions. Courses taken away 
from Smith require the approval of the East Asian 
Studies Advisory Committee. 

1) The second year of an East Asian language, 
which can be fulfilled by Chinese 220d, Japa- 
nese 220d, or Korean 220d, or higher level 
courses. Extensive language study is encour- 
aged, but only two courses at the second year 
level or higher will count toward the Minor. 
Students with native or near-native fluency in 
an East Asian language must take a second East 
Asian language. Native and near-native fluency 
is defined as competence in the language 
above the fourth year level. 

2) Four elective courses, which shall be deter- 
mined in consultation with the adviser nor- 
mally from the fist of approved courses. Elec- 
tive courses must be drawn from both the Hu- 
manities and Social Sciences. 

Advisers: Robert Eskildsen, Daniel K. Gardner, 
Peter Gregory, Marylin Rhie, Dennis Yasutomo, 
Paula Varsano, Suzanne Zhang-Gottschang. 









165 


I Economics 


Visiting faculty and some lecturers are 


generally appointed for a limited term. 


iofessors 


Associate Professors 


fcert T. Averitt, Ph.D. 


Thomas A. Riddeli, Ph.D. 


I'derick Leonard, Ph.D. 


Mahnaz Mahdavi, Ph.D. 


Irk Aldrich, Ph.D. 




[Andrew Zimbalist, Ph.D. 


Assistant Professors 


• Randall Bartlett, Ph.D. 


** 2 James Miller, Ph.D., J.D. 


1 ben Buchele, Ph.D. 


Lewis Davis, Ph.D. 


J Roger T. Kaufman, Ph.D. 


Ardith Spence, Ph.D. 


} Karen Pfeifer, Ph.D. 




r Elizabeth Savoca, Ph.D. 


Instructor 


F -* 1 Deborali Haas-Wilson, Ph.D. 


Roisin O'Sullivan, M.S. 


( arles P. Staelin, Ph.D. 




p Nola Reinhardt, Ph.D., Chair 


Lecturer 




Charles Johnson 




Senior Laboratory Instructor 




Molly Jahnige Robinson, M.A. 


1 st-year students who are considering a major in 


to some of the most pressing issues of our times, 


i department and who hope to spend their jun- 


including poverty and welfare reform, healthcare 


r year abroad are strongly advised to take 150 


costs and delivery, environmental damage and 


id 153 in the first year and to take additional 


restoration, economic growth, federal government 


(urses in economics in the sophomore year. 


budget debates, and the U.S. role in the interna- 


Iijors in economics are strongly advised to take 


tional economy. May not be counted toward the 


0. 253, and 190 as soon after the introductory 


major or minor in economics. Open only to junior 


< urses as possible. Students considering graduate 


and senior non-economics majors. {S} 4 credits 


Idy in economics are advised to master the ma- 


Mark Aldrich, Karen Pfeifer 


lial in ECO 227 and 280 as well as MTH 111, 


Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 



2. 211, 212, 225 and 243. 

. General Courses 



!3 Introduction to Economic Thinking 

' is course presents essential economic concepts 
lay English using a modicum of mathematics, 
d is intended for the concerned citizen-student 
to has never taken, and may never again take, a 
urse in economics. Applies economic reasoning 



150 Introductory Microeconomics 

How and how well do markets work? What should 
government do in a market economy? How do 
markets set prices, determine what will be pro- 
duced, and decide who will get the goods? We 
consider important economic issues including 
preserving the environment, free trade, taxation, 
(de) regulation, and poverty. {S} 4 credits 
Members of the Department 
Offered both semesters each year 



166 



Economi 



153 Introductory Macroeconomics 

An examination of current macroeconomic policy 
issues, including the short and long-run effects of 
budget deficits and surpluses, the determinants of 
economic growth, causes and effects of inflation, 
and the effects of high trade deficits. The course 
will focus on what, if any, government (monetary 
and fiscal) policies should be pursued in order to 
achieve low inflation, full employment, high eco- 
nomic growth, and rising real wages. {S} 4 credits 
Members of the Department 
Offered both semesters each year 

ACC 223 Financial Accounting 

The course, while using traditional accounting 
techniques and methodology, will focus on the 
needs of external users of financial information. 
The emphasis is on learning how to read, interpret 
and analyze financial information as a tool to 
guide investment decisions. Concepts rather than 
procedures are stressed and class time will be 
largely devoted to problem solutions and case 
discussions. A basic knowledge of arithmetic and 
a familiarity with a spreadsheet program is sug- 
gested. Cannot be used for credit towards the eco- 
nomics major and no more than four credits in 
accounting may be counted toward the degree. 
{S} 4 credits 
Charles Johnson 
Offered both semesters each year 

190 Introduction to Statistics for Economists 

The fundamental problems in summarizing, inter- 
preting, and analyzing empirical data. Attention to 
descriptive statistics and statistical inference. Top- 
ics include elementary sampling, probability, sam- 
pling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing 
and regression. Assignments include use of micro 
computers to analyze labor market survey data on 
the earnings and work experiences of men and 
women. Prerequisite: 150 and 153 recommended. 
{S/M} 4 credits 

Robert Buchele, Elizabeth Savoca, Molly 
Robinson (Social Sciences) 
Offered both semesters each year 

227 Mathematical Economics 

The use of mathematical tools to analyze eco- 
nomic problems, with emphasis on linear algebra 
and differential calculus. Applications particularly 



in comparative statics and optimization problem 
Prerequisites: MTH 111, 112, 211, ECO 253, 
and 250 or permission of the instructor. {S/M} 
4 credits 
Lewis Davis 
Offered Spring 2003 

Economic Theory 

200 Economic Game Theory 

An examination of how rational people cooperat 
and compete. Game theory explores situations ii 
which everyone's actions affect everyone else, an 
everyone knows this and takes it into account 
when determining their own actions. Business, 
military and dating strategies will be examined. 
No economics prerequisite. Prerequisite: at leas: 
one semester of high school or college calculus. 
(E) {S} 4 credits 
James Miller 
Offered Fall 2002 

250 Intermediate Microeconomics 

Focuses on the economic analysis of resource 
allocation in a market economy and on the eco- 
nomic impact of various government interven- 
tions, such as minimum wage laws, national hea 
insurance, and environmental regulations. Covei 
the theories of consumer choice and decision 
making by the firm. Examines the welfare impli( 
tions of a market economy, and of federal and 
state policies which influence market choices. 
Prerequisite: 150. {S} 4 credits 
James Miller, Deborah Haas-Wilson 
Offered both semesters each year 

253 Intermediate Macroeconomics 

A consideration of aggregative economic theory i 

a framework for analyzing the determination of i 

and changes in the level of national output. Pre i 

requisite: 153. {S} 4 credits 

Elizabeth Savoca, Roger Kaufman, Roisin 

0' Sullivan 

Offered both semesters each year 

280 Econometrics 

Applied regression analysis. The specification s 1 
estimation of economic models, hypothesis tes 
ing, statistical significance, interpretation of re 



Inomics 



16; 



is, policy implications. Emphasis on practical 

ilications using both cross-section and time- 

iesdata. Prerequisites: 150, 153. and 190, 

IMTH 111. {S/M} ^ credits 

iert Buchele 

ered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

3 Seminar: Free Market Economics 

• structure and institutions of a free market 
nomy; roles of government and philosophical 
iciples underlying the concept of a free market 
! nomy; macro- and micro-performance of a 
i market economy; political-economic ap- 
'ach toward perceived society-wide problems 
1 issues, such as abortion and drug and gun 
itrol, in a free market economy. Prerequisite: 
) or 253- {S} 4 credits 
derick Leonard 
ered Spring 2003, Fall 2003 

3 Seminar: Evolution of Modern 
croeconomics 

m Classical, through Keynesian to modern 
pfy and policy perspectives. Changes in the 
ior components of the macro-mode. Contribu- 
is to macroeconomics made by Keynes: funda- 
tital or superficial? Prerequisite: 253 {S} 
pedits 

derick Leonard 
ered Spring 2004 

le American Economy 

7 Law and Economics 

economic analysis of legal rules and cases, 
lies include contract law, accident law, criminal 
I the Coase theorem and the economics of liti- 
lon. Prerequisite: 250. {S} 4 credits 
ws Miller 
ered Fall 2002 

4 Environmental Economics 

fe causes of environmental degradation and the 

8 that markets can play in both causing and 
jflng pollution problems. The efficiency, equity, 
|l impact on economic growth of current and 
pposed future environmental legislation. Pre- 
huisite: 150. {S} 4 credits 

rkAldrich 
ered Fall 2002 



230 Urban Economics 

An introductory economic analysis of selected 
urban problems in the context of the city's position 
in the regional economy. Topics include housing. 
transportation, concentrations of poverty, and 
financing local government. Prerequisites: 150 
and 153. {S} 4 credits 
Randall Bartlett 
Offered Spring 2004 

243 Economics of the Public Sector 

An investigation into the economic role of the pub- 
lic sector; decision-making mechanisms and im- 
plications for resource allocation. Topics include 
market failure, government failure, and expendi- 
ture and tax analysis. Applications include policy 
issues such as budget deficits/surpluses, social 
security, welfare, military spending and business 
subsidies. Prerequisite: 250. {S} 4 credits 
Ardith Spence 
Offered Spring 2003, Fall 2003 

245 Economics of Corporate Finance 

An investigation of the economic foundations for 
investment, financing, and related decisions in the 
business corporation. Basic concerns and respon- 
sibilities of the financial manager, and the methods 
of analysis employed by them is emphasized. This 
course is designed to offer a balanced discussion 
of practical as well as theoretical developments in 
the field of financial economics. Prerequisites: 
190, 250, MTH 111. {S} 4 credits 
Mahnaz Mahdavi 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

275 Money and Banking 

American commercial banks and other financial 
institutions and their role in macroeconomic sta- 
bilization policy. Structure of the banking industry. 
The monetary theories of neo-Keynesians and 
monetarists. Problems in implementing monetary 
policy. Prerequisite: 253. {S} 4 credits 
Robert Averitt, Roisin 0' Sullivan 
Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2004 

285 American Economic History: 1870-1990 

Major topics include the economic results of Civil 
War for black Americans; the rise of giant industry 
and the growth of unionism; beginnings of eco- 
nomic regulation: internationalization of the 



168 



Econon 



economy; the Great Depression; the New Deal 
legacy; the post World War II boom and stagna- 
tion; Reaganomics. Prerequisites: 150 and 153. 
{H/S} 4 credits 
MarkAldrich 
Offered Fall 2003 

327 Seminar: Economic Methodology 

{S} 4 credits 

Inequality 

The causes and consequences of economic in- 
equality. The role of social class, IQ and educa- 
tion. Why is wealth and income inequality greater 
in the U.S. than in other advanced capitalist coun- 
tries, and why has it increased in the 1980s and 
'90s? Does the neoclassical assumption of exclu- 
sively self-interested "economic man" correctly 
model human behavior (do people care about 
"fairness")? Is there a "tradeoff" between equality 
and economic growth? 
Robert Buchele 
Offered Fall 2003 

331 Seminar: The Economics of Professional 
Sports 

This seminar will explore the economics of pro- 
fessional sports in the United States. Issues of anti- 
trust exemptions, regulation, salary level and 
structure, management, effect of mass media, 
relation to college sports and subordinate leagues 
will be treated. Prerequisites: 190 and 250. {S} 
4 credits 

Andrew Zimbalist 
Offered Spring 2003, Fall 2003, Spring 2004 

351 Seminar: The Economics of Education 

Why does college cost so much? What is the state 
of America's public schools, and what can be done 
to improve them? In this course we will study these 
questions and others related to the economics of 
primary, secondary, and higher education. We will 
develop models of educational choice (is school- 
ing an investment or a signal?) , analyze the role 
for government in the market for education 
(should it provide financial support for schools?), 
and study the implications of institutional policies, 
including preferential admissions, tenure and gov- 
ernance procedures, and endowment spending 
rules as they are practiced in America's universi- 



ties. Prerequisites: ECO 190 and 250. (E) {S} 

4 credits 

Ardith Spence 

Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2004 

International and 
Comparative Economics 

205 International Trade and Commercial 
Policy 

An examination of the trading relationships ami 
countries and of the flow of production factors 
throughout the world economy. Topics include 
theories of international trade, issues of commi 
cial policy and the rise of protectionism, multil; 
eral trade negotiations, preferential trade agree 
ments, the impact of multinational firms, and 
trade and economic development. Prerequisite 
250. {S} 4 credits 
Lewis Davis 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

206 International Finance 

An examination of international monetary theoi 
and institutions and their relevance to national 
international economic policy. Topics include 
mechanisms of adjustment in the balance of pa 
ments; macroeconomic and exchange-rate poli 
for internal and external balance; international 
movements of capital; and the history 7 of the int 
national monetary system: its past crises and ci 
rent prospects; issues of currency union and o 
mal currency area; and emerging markets. Pre : 
requisite: 253- {S} 4 credits 
Mahnaz Mahdavi 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 



208 European Economic Development 

Focus on the development of the European 
economy, 1914-present, and the economics ok 
emerging European Union. Background examt 
tion of the origins of "the European miracle" p 
the evolution of the industrial revolution in W< - 
era Europe since 1800. Attention to the role c 
women's labor, geopolitical factors, and the el 
pansion of international trade and capital invi • 
ment. Some comparison to Eastern Europe, J an 
and the Asian economies. Prerequisites: 150 d 
153 or permission of the instructor. {H/S} 



nomics 



169 



[edits 
en Pfeifer 
-red Fall 2003 



9 Comparative Economic Systems 

toy of leading types of economic systems; con- 
:rs contrasting roles of private and government 
.ors and variation in institutions. Analysis of 
sia and East Europe's current successes and 
blems, as compared with China, Japan, and 
ed capitalist economies such as Sweden, as 
. as with the U.S. and Western Europe. Corn- 
son of economic performance stressing distri- 
onal equity as well as allocative efficiency and 
nomic growth. Prerequisite: 150 and 153- {S} 
.edits 
?n Pfeifer 
?red Spring 2003 



301 Seminar: Economic Growth and World 
Development 

Why did per capita income suddenly start to rise in 
England 250 years ago? Why has growth persisted? 
Can poor countries ever catch up, and if so how? 
This course draws on the Classical, economic his- 
torical, Neoclassical and endogenous growth lit- 
eratures to address these questions as well as the 
relationships between economic growth and pov- 
erty, technological progress, capital accumulation, 
education, relative backwardness, population 
growth, income inequality, democracy, corruption, 
financial sector development, the rule of law, cul- 
tural heterogeneity, geography and natural re- 
source abundance. Prerequisites: ECO 250 or 253 
andMTHlll.(E) {S} 4 credits 
Lewis Davis 
Offered Spring 2004 



L Economic Development 

overview of major economic issues in the Third 

i-ld (Asia, Latin America, Africa, and the Middle 

:). Examines theory, institutions, and develop- 

lt policy. Topics include trade, industrial and 

cultural development, multinational invest- 

jit, employment and technology, women in de- 

•pment, fiscal policy, and international financial 

>.es (lending, balance of payments deficits, the 

it crisis). Prerequisites: 150 and 153- {S} 

edits 

7 Reinhardt 

brad Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

I Economies of the Middle East and 
th Africa 

economic survey of the region of the Middle 
| and North Africa. Topics include the eco- 
lic transformation wrought by colonialism and 
penetration by European capitalism, the con- 
ing importance of integration of the region 
\ the world market system, the variation among 
pent paths of economic development, and 
jr concomitant patterns of industrialization and 
■,irian and socioeconomic change. Prerequi- 
p 150 and 153- {S} 4 credits 
fn Pfeifer 
sred Fall 2002, Fall 2003 



306 Seminar: International Financial Markets 

The 1990s is proving to be the decade of interna- 
tional finance and the globalization of financial 
markets. Some selected topics that illuminate this 
new integrated world of international financial 
markets are: foreign exchange systems and mar- 
kets, international securities, international invest- 
ment and portfolio management. Prerequisites: 
206, 245, 190. Recommended 280. {S} 4 credits 
Mahnaz Mahdavi 
Offered Fall 2002 

310 Seminar: Comparative Labor Economics 

Topic: Labor Economics and Compensation 
Systems. 

Why do lawyers and doctors make so much more 
than college professors? Are corporate executives 
paid too much or too tittle? How 7 much of the 
male-female wage gap is due to discrimination? Is 
education an investment in human capital, a sig- 
nal, or a means of reproducing the class structure? 
How has trade with developing countries affected 
wages in the United States? In this seminar we 
shall apply and extend economic theory to analyze 
these and other questions in labor economics. 
Prerequisites: Eco 250 and 190 {S} 4 credits 
Roger Kaufman 
Offered Fall 2003 



170 



Econoi 



311 Seminar: Topics In Economic 
Development 

Topic Economic Development in Hast Asia. 
In recent decades, many East Asian economies 
have experienced remarkable economic growth. 
This seminar will explore the nature of these 
miracle economies Has economic growth been 
coupled with equity? What are the causes of the 
high grown rates and recent collapse and is 
growth sustainable? Topics include trade, finance, 
industrial policies, industrial relations, business 
organization, technological development, and in- 
ternational financial inflows. Prerequisites: 211, 
and 250 or 253- {S} 4 credits 
Sola Reinbardt 

Offered Spring 2003 

343 Seminar: The Economics of Global 
Climate Change 

Because global climate change has the potential to 
affect every person in even - country — with the 
possibility of catastrophic consequences — it is 
natural to ask why it is happening, and what can 
Of should be done about it. In this course, we will 
examine the sources of economic inefficiency 
causing climate change and study the tradeoffs 
associated with slowing the process. How do 
policy options to slow climate change compare 
with respect to efficiency criteria? How do they 
affect equity domestically, internationally, and 
intertemporally? In addressing these and other 
questions which inform the debate on climate 
change policy, we will also examine the impor- 
tance of political and strategic considerations, and 
the rate of technical change. Prerequisites: ECO 
190 and EGO 250. (E) {S} 4 credits 
Ardith Spence 
Offered Fall 2002 

404 Special Studies 

Admission by permission of the department, 
normally for majors who have had four semester 
courses in economics above the introductory level. 
4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 

408d Special Studies 

\dmission b\ permission of the department, nor- 
mally for majors and minors who have had four 
semester courses in economics above the intro- 
ductory level Students contemplating special 



studies should read the guidelines in the 
departments "Handbook for Prospective Majo 
8 credits 
Full year course; Offered each year 



The Major 



Advisers: Mark Aldrich, Robert Averitt. Randa 
Bartlett, Robert Buchele, Deborah Haas-Wilsoi 
Roger Kaufman, Frederick Leonard, Mahnaz 
Mahdavi, James Miller, Karen Pfeifer, Nola 
Reinhardt, Thomas Riddell, Elizabeth Savoca, 
Charles Staelin, Andrew Zimbalist. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Karen Pfeifer. 

Basis 150 and 153. 

Requirements: ECO 150 and 153 or their equn 
lent, ECO 190 (or MTH 245 and MTH 247 take 
together), ECO 250, ECO 253, and five other 
courses in economics. One of these five must t 
300 level course (or honors thesis) taken at Si 
that includes an economics research paper am 
oral presentation. 

A student who passes the economics placer 
exam for ECO 150 or ECO 153, or who passes 
AP examination in Microeconomics or Macroe 
nomics with a score of 4 or 5, may count this i 
the equivalent of ECO 150 or ECO 153, with 
course credit toward the major in economics. 
Students with AP or IB credit are urged to take 
placement exams to ensure correct placement 

Economics credit will be given for public 
policy courses when taught by a member of th< 
economics department. 

The S/U grading option is not allowed for 
courses counting toward the economics major 
exception mav be made in the case of 150 and 
153. 

Majors may spend the junior year abroad i 
they meet the college's requirements. 

Majors may participate in the Washington I 
nomic Policy semester at American University. 
Thomas Riddell for more information. 

Majors may also participate in the Semeste 
Washington Program and the Washington Sum 
Internship Program administered by the Depa 
ment of Government and described under the 1 
ernment major. 






omics 



171 



The Minor 

Advisers: Same as for the major. 

Requirements: six courses in economics. Three of 
hese courses must include the basis (150 and 
I S3) and either 250 or 253- Crediting procedures 
ire the same as for the major. 



rfonors 

>lrector: Elizabeth Savoca. 



I30d Thesis 

5 credits 

-ult year course; Offered each year 

431 Thesis 

3 credits 

Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

Requirements: A thesis and 8 semester courses 
deluding 150, 153, 190, 250, 253, and three 
: )ther economics courses. 

Students may elect either a year-long thesis 
bourse (430d) or a fall semester course (431). 
The thesis for the year-long course must be sub- 
knitted to the director by April 15. The thesis for 
( the one-semester course must be submitted by the 
first day of classes of the following semester. 

Examination: honors students must take an 
oral examination on the material in their theses. 



172 



Education and Child Study I 

Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

Alan L. Marvelli, Ed.D. 

Sue J. M. Freeman, Ph.D., Chair 

Alan \. Rudnitsky, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 

t 2 Rosetta Marantz Cohen, Ed.D. 

Assistant Professors 

Susan M. Etheredge, Ed.D. 
*- Sam Intrator, Ph.D. 
Lucy Mule, Ph.D. 

Lecturers 

Cathy HoferReid, Ph.D. 
Cathy Weisman Topal, M.A.T. 
Janice Gatty, Ed.D. 



Tutor Supervisor 

Marilyn London, M.A. 

Teaching Fellows 

Joanna W. Frankel, B.A. 
Danielle Hall, B.A. 
Amy E. Lieb, B.A. 
Teodora I Nedialkova, A.B. 
Jennifer M. Torres, A.B. 
Lisa M. Walbridge, B.A. 

Advisory Committee 

Michael A. Cosgriff, M.Ed. 
Gwen Agna, M.Ed. 
Carol Gregory, M.A. 
Johanna M. McKenna, M.A. 
Thomas E. Petray, Jr., M.Ed. 



Students who, irrespective of major, desire to 
comply with the varying requirements of different 
states for certificates to teach in public schools are 
urged to consult the department as early as pos- 
sible during their college career. 

340 Historical and Philosophical Perspec- 
tives and the Educative Process 

A colloquium integrating foundations, the learning 

process, and curriculum. Open only to senior 

majors. {S} 4 credits 

Sue Freeman 

Offered Spring 2003, Fall 2003 

Historical and Philosophical 
Foundations 

110 Introduction to American Education 

Changes and current issues in American education 
are examined from historical, philosophical, psy- 



chological, and socio-political perspectives. In- 
cludes directed observation in school settings. Noi 
open to students who have had two or more 
courses in the department. {S} 4 credits 
Lucy Mule 
Offered Fall 2002 

222 Philosophy of Education 

The Western conception of the educated person. 
A close examination of the works of Rousseau, 
Montessori, Dewey, Whitehead, and other modern 
philosophers of education. {S} 4 credits 
Rosetta Cohen 
Offered Fall 2002 

236 American Education 

Evolution of American educational thought and 
institutions; the development of American educa- 
tion related to the growth of the nation and the 
changing social order. {S} 4 credits 
To be announced 
Offered Spring 2003 



[)n and Child Studv 



173 



12 Growing Up American: Adolescents and 
Mr Educational Institutions 
I institutional educational contexts through 
l ch our adolescents move can powerfully Mu- 
le the growth and development of our youth, 
jig a cross-disciplinary approach, this course 
I examine those educational institutions central 
lidolescent Me: schools, classrooms, school 
I racurriculars, arts-based organizations, athletic 

1 igrams, community youth organizations, faith- 
r ed organizations, and cyber-communities. 

«c issues will be investigated. First, what theo- 
cal and socio-cultural perspectives shape these 
icational institutions? Second, how do these 
titutions serve or fail the diverse needs of 
erican youth? Lastly, how and under what con- 
ons do these educational institutions matter to 
uh? This course includes a service learning 
nmitment and several evening movie slots. En- 
lment limited to 35. {S} 4 credits 
m Intrator 
fered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

2 Perspectives on American Education 

quired of all candidates for the M.A., the Ed.M., 
d the M.A.T. degrees. 4 credits 
isetta Cohen 
fered Spring 2003 

etiological and Cultural 
oundations 

)0 Education in the City 

e course explores how the challenges facing 
tiools in America's cities are entwined with so- 
il, economic and political conditions present 
thin the urban environment. Our essential ques- 
»n asks how have urban educators and policy 
ikers attempted to provide a quality 7 educational 
perience for youth when issues associated with 
eir social environment often present significant 
•stacks to teaching and learning? Using relevant 
cial theory to guide our analyses, we'll investi- 
te school reform efforts at the macro-level by 
oking at policy-driven initiatives such as high 
ikes testing, vouchers, and privatization and at 
e local level by exploring the work of teachers, 
rents, youth workers and reformers. There will 
i fieldwork opportunities available for students. 



Enrollment limited to 35. {S} 4 credits 
Sam Intrator 
Offered Fall 2002 

210 Literacy in Cross-Cultural Perspective 

The nature of literacy and its significance for both 
societies and individuals: key topics include cul- 
tural variations in its forms and uses, the pro- 
cesses and institutions by which it is transmitted 
across generations, and its role in development 
and education. This comparative and socio-cul- 
tural approach will be used to address current 
debates over such issues as the cognitive conse- 
quences of literacy, the determinants of success 
and failure in acquiring it, and its relationship to 
patterns of power and inequality in contemporary 
society. Prerequisite: 235 or permission of the 
instructor. {S} 4 credits 
Lucy Mule 
Offered Spring 2003 

232 The American High School 

A study of the American secondary 7 school as a 
changing social institution. An analysis of the his- 
tory and sociology of the high school, modern 
high school reform and contemporary problems 
of secondary education. Directed classroom ob- 
servation. Not open to first-year students. {S} 
4 credits 
Rosetta Cohen 
Offered Fall 2002 

237 Comparative Education 

This course will look at education from a com- 
parative perspective, using mainly the cultural 
approach to examine educational systems and 
practices in Asia, Africa, Europe, and the United 
States. We will recognize schools as cultural sites 
and explore how schools and education are re- 
searched using ethnographic methodology and 
anthropological theory. We will take a comparative 
look at how some cultural processes occur in the 
hidden curriculum, classroom practices, institu- 
tional processes, language and communication, 
and power relations in schools as well as the effect 
of schools on students and teachers' cultures. {S} 
4 credits 
Lucy Mule 
Offered Fall 2002 



174 



Education and Child Stu 



343 Multicultural Education 

An examination of the multicultural approach, its 
roots in social protest movements and role in edu- 
cational reform. The course aims to develop an 
understanding of the key concepts, developments 
and controversies in the field of multicultural edu- 
cation; cultivate sensitivity to the experiences of 
diverse people in American society; explore alter- 
native approaches for working with diverse stu- 
dents and their families; and develop a sound 
philosophical and pedagogical rationale for a 
multicultural education. Enrollment limited to 35. 
Research and field work required. {S} 4 credits 
Lucy Mule 
Offered Spring 2003 

Learners and the Learning 
Process 

235 Child and Adolescent Growth and 
Development 

A study of theories of growth and development of 
children from birth through adolescence; basic 
considerations of theoretical application to the 
educative process and child study. Directed obser- 
vations in a variety of child-care and educational 
settings. Enrollment limited to 55. {S} 4 credits 
Janice Gatty 
Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 

238 Educational Psychology 

This course combines perspectives on cognition 
and learning to examine the teaching-learning 
process in educational settings. In addition to cog- 
nitive factors the course will incorporate contex- 
tual factors such as classroom structure, teacher 
belief systems, peer relationships, and educational 
policy. Consideration of the teaching-learning pro- 
cess will highlight subject matter instruction and 
assessment. Prerequisite: a genuine interest in 
better understanding teaching and learning. En- 
rollment limited to 55. {S/N} 4 credits 
Alan Rudnitsky 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

249 Children Who Cannot Hear 

Educational, social, scientific, and diagnostic con- 
sideration. Examination of various causes and 
treatments of hearing losses; historical and con- 



temporary issues in the education of deaf childn 

{S} 4 credits 

Alan Marvelli 

Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

510 Human Development and Education 

This course examines basic approaches to the 
study of human development, drawing on theore 
cal perspectives and empirical studies. Students 
study the complex ways that individual and socio 
cultural elements interact in the formation of 
mind, body, and spirit from infancy through ado 
lescence. Bridging theory and practice in the fiel 
of human development and education is the pri- 
mary focus of this course. 4 credits 
Susan Etheredge 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

Curriculum and Instructioi 

231 Foundations and Issues of Early 
Childhood Education 

The purpose of this course is to explore and ex- 
amine the basic principles and curricular and 
instructional practices in early childhood educa- 
tion. Students begin this examination by taking a 
close look at the young child through readings a 
discussion, classroom observations, and a pre- 
practicum in an early childhood setting. The 
course also traces the historical and intellectual 
roots of early childhood education. This will lea 
students to consider, compare, and contrast a 
variety of programs and models in early childhc 
education. {S} 4 credits 
Susan Etheredge 
Offered Fall 2002 

333 Information Technology and Learning 

This course examines the design, use, and effec 
of educational technology. Particular attention i 
paid to how computers can be used to best stnr 
ture, present and influence learner interaction 
with information. To consider these questions, 
students will learn a variety of applications. Th(, 
will include the use of and design for the Work 
Wide Web, multimedia authoring, semantic netj 
working, and the logo computer language. Whi 
the course requires extensive work with compi 
ers, it is intended for beginners with an interes i 



3n and Child Study 



175 



thing and learning. Permission of the instructor 

■quired. {S} 4 credits 

I Rudnitsky 

ered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

3 Children Learning to Read 

is course examines teaching and learning issues 
Ited to the reading process in the preschool 
I elementary classroom. Students develop a 
Dretical knowledge base for the teaching of 
ding to guide their instructional decisions and 
'dices in the classroom setting. Understanding 
at constitutes a balanced reading program for 
:hildren is a goal of the course. Students spend 
additional hour each week engaged in class- 
m observations, study group discussions, and 
dwork. Prerequisite: EDC 238. Open to juniors 
I seniors only with permission. {S} 4 credits 
an Etheredge 
ered Spring 2003 



336 Seminar in American Education 
Topic: Qualitative Research in Education 

In this seminar we will explore the fundamental 
precepts of qualitative educational research and 
examine the myriad ways that teaching and learn- 
ing are represented across culture, history, and 
media. We will study fiction, poetry, visual art, 
research reports, film, and personal narrative and 
use a range of research methodologies, artistic 
media, technologies, and literary forms to create 
our own representations of the learning process. 
The goal of this course is to provide opportunity to 
broaden the forms we employ in describing, inter- 
preting, and evaluating the educational world and, 
ultimately, to transform our inquiry into the devel- 
opment of a fuller and more nuanced understand- 
ing of learners, pedagogies, and educational pro- 
grams. 4 credits 
Sam Intrator 
Offered Fall 2002 



7 Individual Differences Among Learners 

mination of research on individual differences 

I their consideration in the teaching-learning 

'Cess. Research and field work required. Pre- 

uisites: 235 and 238 and permission of the 

;ructor. {S} 4 credits 

\ Freeman 

ered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

Learning Disabilities 

tical study of various methods of assessment 

1 treatment of learning disabilities. Opportunity 
vork with children with learning problems. {S} 
redits 

? Freeman 

ered Spring 2004 

5 The Teaching of Visual Art 

thods and materials for teaching visual arts in 
elementary classroom. Designed for education 
jors with no previous visual arts experience. A 
icticum involving classroom teaching is re- 
red. Admission by permission of the instructor. 
X A} 4 credits 
thy Topal 
fered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 



345d Preschool and Elementary Curriculum 
and Methods 

A study of the curriculum and the application of 
the principles of teaching in the preschool and 
elementary school.. Two class hours and a 
practicum involving directed classroom teaching. 
Prerequisite: three courses in the department 
taken previously, including 235a or b, grade of B- 
or better in education courses. Admission by per- 
mission of the department. Preregistration meet- 
ing scheduled in April. {S} 12 credits 
Susan Etheredge (Fall), Alan Rudnitsky (Spring) 
Full year course; Offered each year 

346 Reflective Practice in Secondary 
Schools and Clinical Internship in Teaching 

Student teaching in secondary schools. Full-time 

practicum. Required prerequisite: EDC 232. Open 

to seniors only. {S} 8 credits 

To be announced 

Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 

352 Methods of Secondary Instruction 

Theories of pedagogy in secondary teaching, in- 
cluding lesson and unit planning, classroom man- 
agement. A concurrent course to EDC 3^6. Open 
only to students enrolled in EDC 346. 4 credits 
Glenn Ellis (Fall), Lucy Mule (Spring) 
Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 



176 



Education and Child Sti 



ENG 490 Teaching Literature 

Discussion of poetry, short stories, short novels, 
essays and drama with particular emphasis on the 
ways in which one might teach them. Consider- 
ation of the uses of writing and the leading of dis- 
cussion classes. MAT students and Seniors only. 
{L} 4 credits 
Sam Scheer 
Offered Spring 2003 

HST 490 Teaching History 

Discussion of primary sources and ways of using 
and interpreting them in high school history 
courses. The first half of the semester will be de- 
voted to developing a course unit on a specific 
topic. The second half will consider additional 
types of source materials from a range of times 
and places in human history. Seminar: enrollment 
limited to 15. {S} 4 credits 
To be announced 
Offered Spring 2003 

SPN 481 Teaching of Spanish 

This course is designed for the advanced student 
or major who wishes to consider a career in 
teaching Spanish. It is an intensive methods course 
which includes theories of second language acqui- 
sition, syllabus design and preparation, criteria for 
textbook selection, interactive pedagogical exer- 
cises within the classroom setting, use of authentic 
materials, multimedia teaching resources, gram- 
matical presentations, and dramatic enactments of 
teaching situations. This course is ideal for stu- 
dents seeking certification in the teaching of Span- 
ish. Prerequisite: one Spanish course at the 300 
level. {F} 4 credits 

548 Student Diversity and Classroom 
Teaching 

An examination of difference, including cognitive 
and affective development, race, ethnicity, sex, 
class, and their consideration in teaching and 
learning. Also, special needs and the 
multilanguage classroom as factors in classroom 
teaching and student learning. Research and field 
work required. {S} 4 credits 
Sue Freeman 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 



554 Cognition and Instructional Design 

A course focusing on the latest developments in 
cognitive science and the potential impact of the 
developments on classroom instruction. Open ti 
seniors by permission of the instructor. 4 credit 
Alan Rudnitsky 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

FRN 559 The Teaching of French 

Practical exercises in foreign language teaching 
supported by exposure to past and current theo 
ries of second language acquisition. Topics in- 
clude: teaching for cultural understanding; plan 
ning instruction for the development of speakin 
listening, writing and reading skills; how to esta 
lish objectives; how to present, personalize, anc 
review material; the accuracy issue; formats for 
proficiency-oriented classroom testing. Open to 
students preparing for teacher certification. {F} 
4 credits 

Smith College and Clark 
School for the Deaf 
Graduate Teacher Educatic 
Program 

Foundations of Education of the D< 

564 Perspectives on the Education, 
Guidance and Culture of the Deaf 

History of the education of the deaf. Educations 
vocational and social issues affecting deaf child 
and adults in our society. 2 credits 
Alan Marvelli 
Offered Fall 2002 

568 Psychology of Exceptional Children 

Growth and development of children, significa i 

of early experiences. Personality development I 

its relation to problems of formal learning for 4 

hearing children and the deaf and hard of hea J 

2 credits 

Yvonne Mullen 

Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 



' 



ation and Child Study 



177 



Ipeech Science and Audiology 

65 Hearing, Speech and Deafness 

credits 

misAltman 

•ffered Summer 2002, Summer 2003 

art I. Nature of Sound 
natomy and physiology of hearing. Processes of 
uditory perception. Anatomy, physiology and 
caustics of speech. TYpes, causes and consc- 
iences of hearing impairment. Characteristics of 
le speech of deaf children. 

art II. Nature of Communication 

peech as a code for language. Speech perception 
nd the effects of sensorineural hearing loss. Audi- 
)ry training and lip-reading instruction. Use of 
earing in the development of speech-production 
kills. 



Language and Communication 

561 Developing Auditory/Oral 
Communications in Deaf Children 

A detailed analysis of speech production covering 
phonetic transcription and developing and im- 
proving speech readiness, voice quality, speech 
breathing, articulation, rhythm, phrasing, accent 
and fluency. Demonstration plus extensive speech 
lab and classroom teaching experiences. 6 credits 
Dianejudd 

562 Developing Language Skills in Deaf 
Children 

Principles and techniques used in development of 
language with deaf children. Study of linguistics 
and psycholinguistics. Consideration is given to 
traditional and modern approaches to language 
development. 4 credits 
Pamela Paskowitz 



•66 Audiometry, Hearing Aids and Auditory 
raining 

ound perception in hearing, hard of hearing and 
eaf individuals. Methods and equipment for test- 
rig and developing sound perception skills. 
! credits 
(ollisAltman 
(ffered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

•73 Audiometry, Acoustics and the Role 
•f the Teacher 

.. Auditory feedback loop, from speech produc- 
'on to perception. B. Cochlear Implants: Intro- 
duction—History of cochlear implant develop- 
ment. Biological implications. Candidacy. Ethical 
ssues. Surgical preparation. Hardware, program- 
ming, troubleshooting. Habitation and classroom 
pplication— signal processing, speech percep- 
ion, speech production, language, evaluation. 
p. Communication Access Assistive Devices. 
'). Audiograms, amplification, classroom acous- 
'ics, IEP's— putting it all together. Prerequisites: 
^C 565 and 566. Limited to candidates for the 
4.E.D. degree. (E) 2 credits 
iollisAltman, Danial Salvucci (Clarke School 
idjunct faculty) 
)ffered Spring 2003 



567 English Language Acquisition and 
Deafness 

A psycholinguistic account of English language 
acquisition of hearing and deaf children. Both 
theory- and empirical research are stressed, and 
links are made to contemporary developments in 
language assessment and intervention. 4 credits 
Peter A. de Villiers 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

Curriculum and Instruction 

563 Elementary School Curriculum, Methods 
and Media for the Deaf 

Principles and methods of the teaching of reading; 
classroom procedures for the presentation of 
other school subjects. Uses of texts and reference 
materials, plus summer sessions devoted to media 
development and utilization, microcomputer op- 
erations and word processing. 4 credits 
Members of the Faculty 

Student Teaching 

569 Observation and Student Teaching 

A minimum of 400 hours of observation and stu- 
dent teaching of deaf children in educational levels 
from preschool through eighth grade, in self-con- 
tained residential and day settings, plus integrated 
day classes. 8 credits 
Members of the Faculty 



178 



Education and Child Stud) 



Education of the Deaf 

571 Introduction to Signing and Deaf Culture 

Development of basic receptive and expressive 
skills in American Sign Language and finger- 
spelling. Considerations of issues related to deaf- 
ness and deaf culture. Participation in activities of 
the deaf community. 4 credits 
Ruth P. Moore 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

572 The Deaf Child: 0-5 Years 

The effects of deafness on the development of chil- 
dren and their families during the first five years of 
life. Topics such as auditory, cognitive, language, 
speech, social and emotional development in deaf 
infants and young children are discussed. Parent 
counseling issues such as emotional reactions to 
deafness, interpretation of test results and making 
educational choices are also presented. 4 credits 
Janice Gutty 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 



Special Studies 

400 Special Studies 

1 to 4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 



The Major 



Requirements: 10 semester courses selected in 
consultation with the major adviser: usually these 
will consist of one course in the Historical and 
Philosophical Foundations (EDC 110 cannot be 
used to fulfill this requirement) ; one course in the 
Sociological and Cultural Foundations; two 
courses in The Learning Process; one course in 
Curriculum and Instruction; EDC 345d; two addi- 
tional courses, one of which must be an advanced 
course; EDC 340 taken during the senior year. 

Students may elect to major without practice 
teaching experience by fulfilling an alternative 
course of study developed in consultation with the 
major adviser and with approval of the depart- 
ment. 



Adviser for Study Abroad: Sue Freeman. 

Director of Teacher Education: Alan Marvelli. 

Teacher/Lecturers — Elementary and Early 
Childhood Program 

Tiphareth Ananda, B.A. 

Penny Block, Ed.M. 

Gina Bordoni-Cowley, M.Ed. 

Elizabeth Cooney, A.B. 

Michelle S. Dilts, Ed.M. 

Katherine First, M.Ed. 

Marie A. Frank, M.Ed. 

Martha N. Guzowski, Ed.M. 

Rita F. Harris, B.S. 

Elisabeth Grams Haxby, Ed.M. 

Janice Henderson, Ed.M. 

Roberta E. Murphy, M.Ed. 

Lara Ramsey, Ed.M. 

Janice Marie Szymaszek, Ed.M. 

Gary A. Thayer, B.A. 

Barry J. Wadsworth, Jr., M.A.T. 

Thomas M. Weiner, M.Ed. 



The Minor 






Required courses: EDC 235, Child and Adolescent 
Growth and Development; EDC 238, Educational 
Psychology. 

Areas of concentration: four courses from an ares 
of concentration. Courses accompanied by an (e) 
on the following list are electives. The specific 
courses taken by a student are worked out with ai 
faculty adviser. 

a. Special Needs 

Adviser: Sue Freeman. 

EDC 239 Counseling Theory and Education (e) 
EDC 248 Individuals with Disabilities 
EDC 249 Children Who Cannot Hear (e) 
EDC 347 Individual Differences Among Learner 

(e) 
EDC 350 Learning Disabilities (e) 



Advisers: Members of the Department. 






Ltion and Child Studv 



179 



Child Development/Early 
tiildhood 

Iviser: Susan Etheredge. 

1 231 Foundations and Issues of EarK 

Childhood Education 
>C 34 1 The Child in Modern Society (e) 
>C 3^5d Preschool and Elementary Curriculum 

and Methods (e) 
•C 347 Individual Differences Among Learners 

(e) 

Learning and Instruction 

Iviser: Alan Rudnitsky. 

E 232 Foundations of Secondary Education 

(e) 
•C 333 Information Technology and Learning 

(e) 
•C 338 Children Learning to Read (e) 
•C 3^5d Preschool and Elementary Curriculum 

and Methods (e) 
>C 356 Curriculum Principles and Design (e) 
C 5-40 Critical Thinking and Research in 

Education (e) 
554 Cognition and Instruction (e) 

Secondary Teaching 

Ivisers: Rosetta Cohen, Sam Intrator. 

>C 232 The American High School 

'C 342 Growing Up American 

>C 346 Reflective Practice in Secondary Schools 

»C 34" Individual Differences Among Learners 

(e) 
ie course from Historical and Philosophical 
undations or Sociological and Cultural 
undations 

Education Studies 

Iviser: Sam Intrator. 

lis minor does not require EDC 235 and EDC 

8. 

: courses from: 
>C221 Classical Education 
>C 2 2 2 Philosophy of Education 
>C 232 The American High School 



EDC 234 Modern Problems of Education 

EDC 236 American Education 

EDC 237 Comparative Education 

EDC 336 Seminar in American Education 

Student-Initiated Minor 

Requirement: EDC 235 and EDC 1W. the approval 
of a faculty adviser, and permission from the mem- 
bers of the department in the form of a majority 
vote. 



Honors 



Director: Rosetta Cohen. 

431 Thesis 

8 credits 

Offered first semester each year 

432d Thesis 

12 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

Requirements: those listed in the major; thesis 
(431, 432d) pursued either in the first semester of 
or throughout the senior year. 

An examination in the candidate's area of concen- 
tration. 



Graduate 



Advisers: Members of the Department. 

510 Human Development and Education 

540 Critical Thinking and Research in 
Education 

552 Perspectives on American Education 

554 Cognition and Instruction 

548 Student Diversity and Classroom 
Teaching 

567 English Language Acquisition and 
Deafness 

580 Advanced Studies 

Open to seniors by permission of the department. 

-t credits 

Members of the Department 



ISO 



Education and Child Stui 



Requirements for Programs 
Leading to Teacher 
Certification 

Secondary Teacher (9-12) in the 

following fields: 



English 


Mathematics 


History 


Biology 


Social Studies 


Chemistry 


French 


Earth Science 


Spanish 


General Science 


Physics 


Visual Art 



UNDERGRADUATE 

• meet course distribution requirements 
for Latin honors (with exception of foreign 
language) 

• major in the appropriate discipline 

• one course (or equivalent experience) 
in the use of information technology 

• complete the following courses in Education 
and ChUd Study: 

EDC 232 The American High School 
EDC 238 Educational Psychology 
EDC 3-i2 Growing l"p American 
EDC 347 Individual Differences Among 

Learners 
EDC 3-1:6 Reflective Practice in Secondary 

Schools 
EDC 352 Methods of Secondary Instruction 

GRADUATE 

• completion of Master of .Arts in Teaching de- 
gree 

• departmental assessment of subject matter 
preparation and background in the use of in- 
formation technology 

• complete the following courses in Education 
and Child Study: 

EDC 556 Learning in Classrooms 

(Summer Program) 
EDC 552 Perspectives on American Education 
EDC S48 Student Diversity and Classroom 

Teaching 
ED< 1 510 Human Development and Education 
or 

EDt ss-i Cognition and Instruction 
EDC 559 Clinical Internship in Teaching II 
Four ad\anced courses in the subject area 



Elementary Teacher (1-6) &Earlv 
Childhood' Teacher (N-3) 

UNDERGRADUATE 

• meet course distribution requirements for 
Latin honors (with exception of foreign 
language) 

• major in a liberal arts discipline 

• one course (or equivalent experience) that 
emphasizes the use of information technology 

• complete the following courses in Education 
and Child Study: 

EDC 235 Child and Adolescent Growth and 

Development 
EDC 238 Educational Psychology 
EDC 338 Children Learning to Read 
EDC 347 Individual Differences Among 

Learners 
EDC 345d Preschool and Elementary 
Curriculum and Methods 
one course in either historical and philosoph 
cal or sociological and cultural foundatioi 
of education (not EDC 110) 
one course in the area of early childhood edi 
cation (for Earlv Childhood Teacher) 






GRADUATE 

• completion of Master of Education degree 

• departmental assessment of subject matter 
preparation and background in the use of in- 
formation technology 

• departmental assessment of subject matter 
knowledge in early childhood education (for 
Early Childhood Teacher) 

• completion the following courses in Educatk 
and Child Study: 

EDC 556 Learning in Classrooms (Summer 

Program) 

EDC 552 Perspectives on American Educati 
EDC 548 Student Diversity and Classroom 

Teaching 
EDC 510 Human Development and Educati 
EDC 554 Cognition and Instruction 
EDC 559 Clinical Internship in Teaching II 
Two elecuves — selected to address assessed 
needs in specific areas of competence 



181 



Engineering 






Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



>fessors 

menico Grasso, Ph.D., P.E., Chair 
Mh Haas, Ph.D. (Mathematics and 
Engineering) 

sociate Professors 

jana Mikic, Ph.D. 



Assistant Professors 

Susan Voss, Ph.D. 
Andrew Guswa, Ph.D. 
Donna Riley, Ph.D. 

Judith Cardell, Ph.D. (Clare Booth Luce Assistant 
Professor of Computing Engineering) 

Visiting Professor 

Glenn Ellis, Ph.D. 



-beral arts education involves the acquisition of 
jieral knowledge to develop the ability for rea- 
ped judgment and to prepare graduates to live 
! and rewarding lives. In a technologically rich 
, engineering must become an integral part of 
> liberal arts environment. Engineering, often 
arred to as the application of scientific and 
thematical principles in the service of humanity, 
he bridge that connects the basic sciences and 
ihemaucs to the humanities and social sci- 
•es. 

Designing the Future: An Introduction to 
gineering 

froduction to engineering practice through par- 
ipation in a semester-long team-based design 
oject. Students will develop a sound understand- 

1 of the engineering design process, including 
foblem definition, background research, identifi- 
sion of design criteria, development of metrics 

1 methods for evaluating alternative designs, 
^totype development, and proof of concept test- 
i . Working in teams, students will present their 
as frequently through oral and written reports, 
iding assignments, in-class discussions, and 
1 al field trips will challenge students to critically 
iilyze contemporary issues related to the interac- 
i of technology' and society. {N} 4 credits 
yanaMikic, Donna Riley, Susan Voss 
: ered Fall semester each year 



101 Structures and the Built Environment 

This course, designed for a general audience, ex- 
amines the development of large structures (tow- 
ers, bridges, domes) throughout history with em- 
phasis on the past 200 years. Following the evolu- 
tion of ideas and materials, it introduces students 
to the interpretation of significant works from 
scientific, social, and symbolic perspectives. Ex- 
amples include the Brooklyn Bridge, the Eiffel 
Tower, and the Big Dig. {N} 4 credits 
Andrew Guswa 
Offered Fall semester each year 

MTH 204 Differential Equations and 
Numerical Methods in Engineering 

An introduction to the computational tools used 
to solve mathematical and engineering problems 
such as error analysis, root finding, linear equa- 
tions, optimization, ordinary and partial differen- 
tial equations. Prerequisites: MTH 112 or MTH 
1 14 or permission of the instructor. {M} 4 credits 
Pan Atela 
Offered Spring 2003 

210 Engineering, the Environment, and 
Sustainability 

This course provides a quantitative introduction 
to the description and solution of environmental 
quality problems. Beginning with a holistic over- 
view of engineering principles that are generally 



182 



Engineering 



applicable to defining natural and anthropogenic 
environmental perturbations, the course subse- 
quently explores specific applications in various 
media (water, air, soil), hazardous waste manage- 
ment, resource utilization, risk management, glo- 
bal climate change and sustainable development. 
Course content has a substantial focus on quantita- 
tive analysis. Prerequisites (or corequisites) : MTH 
1 1 1 and 1 12, or MTH 114, CHM 111, or permis- 
sion of the instructor. {N} 4 credits 
Do men i co Grasso 
Offered Spring semester each year 

220 Engineering Circuit Theory 

Analog and digital circuits are the building blocks 
of computers, medical technologies, and all things 
electrical. This course introduces both the funda- 
mental principles necessary to understand how 
circuits work and mathematical tools that have 
widespread applications in areas throughout engi- 
neering and science. Topics include: Kirchhoff's 
laws, Thevenin and Norton equivalents, superposi- 
tion, responses of first-order and second-order 
networks, time-domain and frequency-domain 
analyses, frequency-selective networks. Prerequi- 
sites (or corequisites): PHY 116 and PHY 210 (or 
equivalents) or permission of the instructor. {N} 
4 credits 
Susan Voss 
Offered Fall semester each year 

MTH 227 Topics in Modern Mathematics 
Optimization Methods of Operations 
Research 

Topic: Optimization methods of Operations 
Research 

Operations Research applies mathematics to prob- 
lems of management and engineering. This course 
will cover the formulation and solution of linear 
programming problems, including sensitivity 
analysis and duality. Applications include such 
models as resource allocation and production 
planning. Network theory and probabilistic meth- 
ods will be introduced briefly. Prerequistites: MTH 
2 1 1 OR junior standing in engineering OR permis- 
sion of the instructor. {M} 4 credits 
Ruth Haas 
Offered Fall 2002 



230 Engineering and Public Policy 

This course employs a number of quantitative 
tools for decision making about engineering and 
technology, and a systems analytical approach to 
policy development. Students will learn how to 
appropriately apply these tools, how the federal 
government makes decisions about science and 
technology, and the role of values and ethical judg 
ments in such decisions. Tools covered in the 
course include: systems analysis, time value of 
money, life cycle analysis, risk assessment, deci- 
sion analysis, back-of-the-envelope calculations, 
and cost-benefit analysis. Case studies are drawn 
from peace and global security, environment, en- 1 
ergy, information technology, biotechnology, and 
poverty and development. Prerequisite (or co- 
requisite) : a course in science or engineering, or 1 
a course in American government or public polk 
or permission of the instructor. {S/M} 4 credits ' 
Donna Riley 
Offered Spring 2003 

260 Chemical Engineering Principles 

This course provides an introduction to funda- 
mental principles that govern the design and 
analysis of chemical processes. The conversion ■ 
mass and energy will serve as the basis for the 
analysis of steady-state and transient behavior of 
reactive and non-reactive systems. Specific topic 
covered will include a review of basic thermody 
namics, behavior of ideal and real gases, phase 
equilibria, and an application of these principle 
to the concept of industrial ecology. Prerequisiti 
MTH 112, CHM 111. {N} 4 credits 
Domenico Grasso 
Offered Fall 2002 

270 Continuum Mechanics I 

This is the first course in a two-semester sequeii: 
designed to introduce students to fundamental 
theoretical principles and analysis of mechanic f 
continuous media, including solids and fluids. ; 
Concepts and topics to be covered in this coun 
include conservation laws, static and dynamic 
behavior of rigid bodies, analysis of machines :l 
frames, internal forces, centroids, moment of if 
tia, vibrations and an introduction to stress an< 
strain. Prerequisite: PHY 115, MTH 112 (or th 
equivalent) or permission of the instructor. {N 



ngineering 



183 



1 credits 

ilenn li His 

)ffered Fall semester each year 

•71 Continuum Mechanics II 

'his is the second course in a two-semester se- 
luence designed to introduce students to funda- 
nental theoretical principles and analysis of me- 
hanics of continuous media, including solids and 
bids. Concepts and topics to be covered in this 
ourse include intensive and extensive 
lermophysical properties of fluids, control-vol- 
me and differential expressions for conservation 
I mass, momentum, and energy, dimensional 
jialysis, and an introduction to additional topics 
uch as viscous and open-channel flows. Prerequi- 
ite: EGR 2~0. {N} 4 credits 
ndrew Guswa 
tffered Spring semester each year 

72 The Science and Mechanics of Materials 

his course introduces students to the fundamen- 
ts of materials science and the mechanics of 
laterials. Structural behavior will be analyzed, 
long with the material and geometric contribu- 
ons to this behavior. Lecture topics will be 
omplemented with hands-on laboratory exped- 
ients. Topics include stress and strain, deforma- 
ns and deflections, crystalline and amorphous 
laterials. defects, thermal behavior of materials, 
letals. ceramics, polymers, and materials selec- 
on. Prerequistes: EGR 2"0 and CHM 1 1 1 , or the 
■quivalent. {N} 4 credits 
'orjana Mikic 
Offered Spring semester each year 

!90 Engineering Thermodynamics and Heat 
ransfer 

iodern civilization relies profoundly on efficient 
•roduction. management, and consumption of 
:nergy Thermodynamics is the science of energy 
reformations involving work, heat, and the 
Toperties of matter. Engineers rely on thermody- 
amics to assess the feasibility of their designs in a 
,ide variety of fields including chemical process- 
tig, pollution control and abatement, power gen- 
ration, materials science, engine design, con- 
struction, refrigeration, and microchip processing. 
ourse topics include: first and second laws of 
tiermodynamics. power cycles, combustion and 



refrigeration, phase equilibria, ideal and non-ideal 
mixtures, conductive, convective, and radiative 
heat transfer. Prerequisites (or co-requisites): 
CHM 1 1 1 and PHY 2 10 (or the equivalents) or 
permission of the instructor. {N} 4 credits 
Donna Riley 
Offered Fall semester each year 

312 Physiocochemical Processes in the 
Atmosphere 

Air pollution is a problem of local, regional and 
global scale that requires an understanding of the 
sources of pollutants in the atmosphere, their fate 
and transport, and their effects on humans and the 
environment. This course provides the technical 
background for understanding and addressing air 
pollution in both engineering and policy terms, 
with an emphasis on engineering controls. Prereq- 
uisites: CHM 111, PHY 210 and EGR 210 (or 
equivalents) or EGR 260 or permission of the in- 
structor. 4 credits 
Donna Riley 
Offered Fall 2002 

315 Ecohydrology 

This course focuses on the study of how hydrology 
affects ecosystems with an eye to understanding 
the impacts of human modification of the natural 
hydrologic cycle. Material will include the concep- 
tual understanding of hydrologic processes and 
their statistical and mathematical representation. 
Topics for the latter portion of the semester will be 
driven by student interest and may include nutrient 
transport, biogeochemical qcles, and evaluation 
of evapotranspiration models. Prerequisites: MTH 
1 12 or 1 14 and MTH 245 (or permission of the 
instructor) . 4 credits 
Andrew Guswa 
Offered Fall 2002 

320 Signals and Systems 

The concepts of linear system theory (e.g.. Signals 
and Systems) are fundamental to all areas of engi- 
neering, including the transmission of radio sig- 
nals, signal processing techniques (e.g.. medical 
imaging, speech recognition, etc.). and the design 
of feedback systems (e.g., in automobiles, power 
plants, etc.). This course will introduce the basic 
concepts of linear system theory, including convo- 
lution, continuous and discrete time Fourier analv- 



184 



Engineering 



sis. Laplace and Z transforms, sampling, stability, 
feedback, control, and modulation. Examples will 
be utilized from electrical, mechanical, biomedi- 
cal, environmental and chemical engineering. 
Prerequisites: EGR 220 and PHY 210. {M} 
4 credits 
Susan loss 
Offered Spring semester each year 

340 Geotechnical Engineering 

An introduction to the engineering behavior of soil 
with design applications in civil and environmental 
engineering. Topics include the origin and nature 
of soil, hydraulic conductivity and seepage, volume 
changes, stress-strain behavior, and soil dynamics 
and earthquake engineering. Prerequisite: EGR 
2~2 or GEO 241. {N} 4 credits 
Glenn Ellis 
Offered Spring 2003 

346 Hydrosystems Engineering 

Through systems analysis and design projects, this 
course introduces students to the held of water 
resources engineering. Topics include data collec- 
tion and analysis, decision-making under uncer- 
tainty, the hydrologic cycle, hydropower, irriga- 
tion, flood control, water supply, engineering eco- 
nomics, and water law. Prerequisites: MTH 1 12 or 
1 14. EGR 271, and MTH 245 (or permission of 
the instructor) . 4 credits 
Andrew Gustva 
Offered Spring 2003 

360 Chemical & Environmental Reaction 
Engineering 

A quantitative review of physical, chemical and 
biological fundamentals sets the stage for the 
analysis and prediction of rates of chemical and 
biochemical conversion in homogeneous, hetero- 
geneous and catalytic systems. Topics will include 
mathematical models to describe elementary and 
non-elementary reactions, microbial growth, 
product inhibition, molecular diffusion, and hy- 
drodynamic dispersion, and reactor efficiency 
Prerequisite: EGR 260, or permission of the in- 
structor. {N/M} 4 credits 
Do me ni co Grasso 
Offered Fall 2003 



363 Mass Transfer and Separations 
Processes 

This course covers mass transport phenomena 
and unit operations for separation processes, with 
applications in both chemical and environmental 
engineering. Topics covered in the course include: 
mechanical separations, distillation, gas absorp- 
tion, liquid extraction, leaching, adsorption, and 
membrane separations. Prerequisites: EGR 260 
and either EGR 271 or EGR 290, or permission of 
the instructor. 4 credits 
Donna Riley 
Offered Spring 2003 

BIO 370 Topics in Microbiology 

Topic: Models, Assumptions and Reality in 
Microbial Biology 

An examination of the interface between existing 
models and representations of single species and 
community dynamics in microbial biology, and of 
the fit between these models and our increasing 
empirical knowledge in microbiology. The semi- 
nar will emphasize the quantitative underpinnings, 
simplifying assumptions and overall utility of mod- 
els of exponential and logistic growth, material 
and energy- flow, community dynamics, surface 
biofilms, plasmid and horizontal gene transfer and 
invasions, pathogenesis and resistance. Permissiot 
of the instructor required. {N} 4 credits 
Robert Dorit, Donwnico Grasso (Engineering) 
Offered Fall 2002 

372 Advanced Solid Mechanics and Failure 
Analysis 

Building on the fundamentals of solid mechanics 
and materials science introduced in EGR 272, ttuV 
course provides students with an advanced devel- 
opment of techniques in failure analysis, includin 
static failure theories, fatigue life prediction, and ! 
linear elastic fracture mechanics. These tech- 
niques are used in many aspects of mechanical 
design and the evaluation of structural integrity. f 
Prerequisites: EGR 270 and EGR 2~2 or equivalei 
statics and introductory solid mechanics. {N} 
4 credits 
Borjana Mikic 
Offered Fall 2002 



tgineenng 



185 



73 Skeletal Tissue Biomechanics 

lowledge of the mechanical and material behav- 
r of the skeletal system is important for under- 
inding how the human body functions, and how 
e biomechanical integrity of the tissues compris- 
l the skeletal system are established during de- 
lopment, maintained during adulthood, and 
stored following injury. This course will provide 
igorous approach to examining the mechanical 
havior of the skeletal tissues, including bone, 
idon, ligament, and cartilage. Engineering, basic 
ience. and clinical perspectives will be inte- 
ated to study applications in the field of Ortho- 
edic Biomechanics. Enrollment limited to 16. 
erequisites include EGR 272 and BIO 1 1 1, or 
amission of the instructor. {N} 4 credits 
\rjana Mikic 
fered Spring 2003 

10 Neuroengineering 

is course explores how electric potentials are 
nerated across the membranes of cells and how 
Us use these potentials to send messages. Spe- 
ic topics include: lumped- and distributed-pa- 
! meter models of cells, core conductor and cable 
)dels, action potentials, voltage clamp currents, 
|e Hodgkin-Huxley model, myelinated nerve fi- 
rs and salutatory conduction, ion channels, and 
ting currents. After thorough study of these cel- 
! ar processes, the class focuses on three specific 
::hnologies that take advantage of electrically- 
citable cells within the human body: the co- 
'lear implant, the pacemaker, and electrically- 
oked potentials (e.g., EKG). Prerequisites: MTH 
1 and 112 and EGR 220 or PHY 116 and BIO 
1 or 1 12 or permission of the instructor. 
/M} 4 credits 
fan Voss 
fered Spring 2003 

)0 Special Studies 

liable credit 1-4 as assigned 

LOd Engineering Design Clinic 

is two-semester course will synthesize and mar- 
al the students' previous coursework to address 
'eal engineering design problem. An initial set of 
:tures will prepare students for professional 
actice. Topics include: the engineering design 
ocess, engineering economics, project plan- 



ning/management, professional ethics, contracts 
and specifications, insurance liability, professional 
communication, engineering and society, human 
factors, life cycle analysis, intellectual property, 
safety and the environment. Students will work, in 
teams, on year-long design projects. Weekly design 
meetings progress reports. Final report, prototype 
development, and presentations will be required. 
Prerequisite: EGR 100 and Senior standing in En- 
gineering. 8 credits 
Domenico Grasso 
Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 

900d Engineering Design Clinic 

This two-semester course will synthesize and mar- 
shal the students' previous coursework to address 
a real engineering design problem. An initial set of 
lectures will prepare students for professional 
practice. Topics include: the engineering design 
process, engineering economics, project plan- 
ning/management, professional ethics, contracts 
and specifications, insurance liability, professional 
communication, engineering and society, human 
factors, life cycle analysis, intellectual property, 
safety and the environment. Students will work, in 
teams, on year-long design projects. Weekly design 
meetings progress reports. Final report, prototype 
development, and presentations will be required. 
Prerequisite: EGR 100 and Senior standing in En- 
gineering. 8 credits 
Domenico Grasso 
Offered Fall 2003, Spring 2004 



The Major 



Advisers: Members of the Department 

The value of more liberally educated engineers, 
who typically bring strong communication and 
abstract reasoning skills to their work, has re- 
cently been acknowledged by the national engi- 
neering accrediting board, which has moved to 
give greater weight to the liberal arts in designing 
auricular standards. Consequently, the Engineer- 
ing major is based on a rigorous plan of study 
integrated with the liberal arts. 

Smith offers an undergraduate curriculum 
leading to a degree in Engineering Science, the 
broad study of the theoretical scientific underpin- 



186 



Engineerii 



Dings that govern the practice of all engineering 
disciplines. The American Society for Engineering 
Education, identifying the critical need for broadly 
educated engineers, points out that the design of 
an engineering curriculum should "recognize 
the pitfalls of overspecialization in the face of 
an increasing demand for graduates who can 
demonstrate adaptability to rapidly changing tech- 
nologies and to increasingly complex multina- 
tional markets." 

An integral component of the Program is the 
continuous emphasis on the use of engineering 
science principles in design. This culminates in a 
final design project that incorporates broad-based 
societal aspects. Students are encouraged to pur- 
sue a corporate and/or research internship to 
supplement their classroom instruction. 

Engineers must be able to communicate effec- 
tively and work in team settings. Smith's highly- 
regarded writing intensive first year curriculum 
will ensure that engineering students begin their 
engineering curriculum with appropriate commu- 
nication skills that will be refined during the re- 
mainder of their studies. Virtually every engineer- 
ing course offered at Smith incorporates elements 
of team work and oral/written communication. 

Requirements of the major: 

Math: MTH 111 & 112 (or 114), PHY 210, MTH 
204, MTH 245 

Physics: PHY 115, PHY 116 (or PHY 214) 

Chemistry: CHM 1 1 1 or higher 

Computer Science: CSC 1 1 1 

Engineering Core: 100, 210, 220, 270, 271, 
ri, 290, 320, -tlO (8 credit Design Clinic) 

Technical Electives: Three related engineering 
courses (two of which must be 300 level or 
higher, a 4-credit independent study research 
project may constimte one of the courses) 



Students are required to demonstrate breadth in 
the liberal arts. This can be done by either fulfill- 
ing the Latin Honors distribution requirements oi 
by submitting to the Engineering Faculty, for con- 
sideration and approval, a cogent proposal outlir 
ing an alternative strategy for achieving this 
breadth. 

Students are strongly encouraged to take an 
additional course in the natural sciences (e.g., 
biology, geology) 

In addition to majoring in engineering at 
Smith, students may pursue engineering studies 
through two other options. The first is a 3-2 dua 
degree program with the Thayer School of Engi- 
neering at Dartmouth College where students 
spend three years at Smith and two years at 
Dartmouth. Students interested in this dual degre 
program should note that the curriculum, similai 
to Smith's own major in engineering, is very dial 
lenging and requires solid preparation in math 
and science during the first two years. Graduates 
of this program will receive an A.B. from Smith 
and a B.E. from Dartmouth. The second option is 
an Engineering minor (see below) . 



The Minor 






Advisers: Major advisers also serve as advisers fo 
the minor 

The requirements for the minor in engineering 
comprise a total of 6 courses. These courses mu 
include MTH 1 1 1 (or higher) , PHY 1 1 5 (or 
higher), EGR 100, and three EGR Electives (at at 
level). No more than one course designed prim; 
rily for non-majors may be included. 



187 



English Language and Literature 



Visiting faculty and some 


lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 








ofessors 




Luc Gilleman, Ph.D. 


rol Christ, Ph.D. 




Michael Thurston, Ph.D. 


1 Harold Lawrence Skulsky, Ph.D. 






! Dean Scott Flower, Ph.D. 




Assistant Professors 


lliam Allan Oram, Ph.D. 




Ambreen Hai, Ph.D. 


ferson Hunter, Ph.D. 




f Floyd Cheung, Ph.D. 


Douglas Lane Patey, Ph.D. 






arles Eric Reeves, Ph.D. 




Senior Lecturers 


zabeth Wanning Harries, Ph.D. (English 


Robert Ellis Hosmer, Jr., Ph.D. 


Language and Literature and Comparative 


** J Ann E. Boutelle, Ph.D. 


Literature) , Chair 






aron Cadman Seelig, Ph.D. 




Lecturers 


chael Gorra, Ph.D. 




Julio Alves, Ph.D. 


i:hard Millington, Ph.D. 




James Hicks, Ph.D. 


ira F. Crow, Ph.D. 




Debra L. Carney, M.F.A. 


Craig R. Davis, Ph.D. 




Holly Davis, M.A. 
Mary Koncel, M.F.A. 



zabeth Drew Professor 

buglas Bauer 

lace Hazard Conkling Writer-in-Residence 

I nri Cole 

sociate Professors 
I Patricia Lyn Skarda, Ph.D. 

Gillian Murray Kendall, Ph.D. 
1 * 2 Nancy Mason Bradbury; Ph.D. 

Cornelia Pearsall, Ph.D. 



Brian Turner, M.F.A. 
Ellen Dore Watson, M.F.A. 
Sara London, M.F.A. 
Samuel Scheer, M.Phil. 
Sherrill Harbison, Ph.D. 
Beth Kissileff, Ph.D. 
Michelle Hoover, M.F.A. 
Nancy Coiner, Ph.D. 

Mendenhall Fellow 

Nicole Aljoe, M.A. 



e purpose of the English major is to develop a 
i tical and historical understanding of the English 
liguage and of the literary traditions it has 
siped in Britain, in the Americas, and throughout 
I? world. During their study of literature at Smith, 
Iglish majors are also encouraged to take allied 
mrses in classics, other literatures, history, phi- 
liophy, religion, art, and theatre. Fuller descrip- 
i ns of each term's courses, faculty profiles, and 
«ier important information for majors and those 



interested in literary study can be found on the 
department's web page, accessible via the Smith 
College home page. 

To assist students in selecting appropriate 
courses, the department's offerings are arranged 
in Levels I-V, as indicated and explained below. 
Letters in square brackets after courses indicate 
which categorv of major requirement No. 3 each 
fulfills. 



188 



English Language and Literati] 



LEVEL I 

Courses numbered 100-199: Introductory 
Courses, open to all students. In English 1 18 and 
1 20, first year students have priority in the fall 
semester, and other students are welcome as 
space permits. For students in the class of '05 and 
after, English 199 is the required basis for the 
English major. 

First-Level Courses in 
Writing 

ENG 1 18 may be repeated, but only with a differ- 
ent instructor and with the permission of the di- 
rector. Students who received scores of 4 and 5 on 
the Advanced Placement tests in English Language 
and Literature and English Language and Compo- 
sition may receive 4 credits each, providing they 
do not take English 118. 

118 Colloquia in Writing 

In sections limited to 15 students each, this course 
primarily provides systematic instruction and 
practice in reading and writing academic prose, 
with emphasis on argumentation. The course also 
provides instruction and practice in conducting 
research and in public speaking. Bilingual stu- 
dents and non-native speakers are especially en- 
couraged to register for sections taught by Julio 
Alves. Priority will be given to incoming students in 
the fall-semester sections. 4 credits 
Director: Julio Alves 
Sections as listed below: 



opment of racial identity and related issues. Topi 
include ethnic identity, racism, naming and iden- 
tity, affirmative action, and the model minority 
myth. Wl 
Julio Alves 
Offered Fall 2002 



The Politics of Language 
Reading, thinking, and writing about the forces 
that govern and shape language. A series of ana- 
lytical essays will focus on issues such as politica 
correctness, obscenity, gender bias in language, 
and censorship. Wl 
Holly Davis 
Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 






Conflicts and Connections 

Writing analytical essays in response to works by 

international authors on such topics as rites of 

passage, work, education, race, feminism and 

social policies. Wl 

Mary Koncel, Debra Carney 

Offered Fall 2002 

American Identities 

Reading and writing analytic texts on identity pol 

tics. Topics include family relations, personal an 

group identity, oppression and violence, and act 

ism. Wl 

Julio Alves 

Offered Spring 2003 



First-Level Courses in 
Literature 






Writing, Identity, and Culture 
Practice in writing essays of observation, analysis, 
and argument. Readings cover a range of subjects 
from questions of personal identity to public is- 
sues of culture and politics. A strong focus on 
working with sources and developing research 
skills. Wl 
Brian Turner 
Offered Fall 2002 

Diversity, Community, and the Complexities of 

Difference 

Reading and writing analytic texts about the devel- 



100 Banned in the U.S.A. 

A one-credit lecture course that will introduce 

students to the interaction between literary text 

and contexts by presenting several cases of cen 

ship in American literary history. An introductk 

and invitation to some key texts and topics in 

American literature. Six lectures and several br 

written assignments. Graded Satisfactory/Unsat: 

factory only. (E) 1 credit 

Dean Flower, Richard Millington, Michael 

Thurston 

Offered Spring 2003 






English Language and Literature 



\M 



112 Reading Contemporary Poetry 

rhis course offers the opportunity to read contem- 
porary poetry and meet the poets who write it. 
Class sessions, led by the director of the Poetry 
Center, will alternate with readings by visiting po- 
ets. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only. {L} 
1 credit 

Ellen Dore Watson 
Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 

L20 Colloquia in Literature 

Each colloquium is conducted by means of di- 
rected discussion, with emphasis on close reading 
ind the writing of short analytical essays. Priority 
wll be given to incoming students in the fall-se- 
mester sections of the colloquia. Other students 
should consult the course director about possible 
Dpenings. Enrollment in each section limited to 
20. 4 credits 

Directors: Nora F Crow (Fall) ; Dean Flower, 
(Spring) 

Action 

\ study of the novel, novella, and short story, 
stressing the formal elements of fiction, with inten- 
sive analysis of works by such writers as Austen, 
Dickens, James, Faulkner, Joyce, Lawrence, and 
Woolf. {L} Wl 

Robert Hosmer, Michael Gorra, Sherrill 
Harbison, Beth Kissileff 
Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 

The Gothic in Literature 

terror, guilt, and the supernatural in novels, tales, 

and poems from the 18th to the 20th century. Au- 

hors include Walpole, Lewis, Austen, Coleridge, 

Man' Shelley, Byron, the Brontes, and James. {L} 

Wl 

\oraF. Crow 

Offered Fall 2002 

Mysteries and Investigations 
A study of fiction, plays, and poetry about the in- 
vestigation of mysteries, the ciphering and deci- 
phering of plots, the guilt of investigators, and 
dubious solutions. Fiction by Poe, Dickens, Doyle, 
Faulkner, and others. Plays by Sophocles, 
Shakespeare, and Stoppard. A film by Hitchcock 
and poetry by Dickinson, Robinson, Frost, and 
Bishop. {L} Wl 



Dean Flower 
Offered Fall 2002 

Reading and Writing Short Poems 
Reading of lyric poetry from the point of view of 
the poet. Selected poems from Donne to the 
present. Writing includes critical essays, imita- 
tions, and original poetry. {L} Wl 
Ann Boutelle 
Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 

Modern Drama 

Reading of a selection of modern and contempo- 
rary plays that investigate problems of language 
and identity. Playwrights to include Pinter, 
Stoppard, Churchill, Handke, Pomerance, Albee, 
Rabe, O'Neill, Beckett, Shaffer, Pirandello. {L} Wl 
Luc Gilleman 
Offered Fall 2002 

Shakespeare and Film 

A study of the way filmmakers edit, distort, clarify, 
and otherwise interpret Shakespeare's plays; the 
process of metamorphosing theatre into film, im- 
agery into image. Works to be studied include 
Henry V, Richard III, Romeo and Juliet, King 
Lear, Twelfth Night, The Winter's Tale. {L} Wl 
Jefferson Hunter 
Offered Fall 2002 

Reading the Landscape 
A study of the ways in which literature — mainly 
essays, poems, and narrative — has been used to 
understand and value the landscape. Attention to 
issues of landscape design, ecology; "wilderness," 
farming, and intervention. Emphasis on how writ- 
ers design and shape, rather than merely react to. 
their natural environments. Discussion of such 
figures as Henry David Thoreau, Rachel Carson. 
Wendell Berry, Mary Oliver, Robert Frost, Man 
Austin. Ann Zwinger, and Barry Lopez. Writing 
about landscapes and at least one field trip will 
be part of the experience. {L} Wl 4 credits 
Dean Flower 
Offered Spring 2003 

Comic Drama 

A study of landmarks in the evolution of the sec- 
ond most ancient form of drama, from its outra- 
geous beginnings in Aristophanes to its transfer- 



190 



English Language and Literature 



mations in Shakespeare and Ben Jonson and the 
Reformation comedians, to its dotty exaltation in 
Wilde, to the reformist optimism of Shaw, to the 
rendezvous of comedy with tragedy in the modern- 
ist theater of Beckett. What (if anything) is comic 
laughter inviting us to celebrate? Why does com- 
edy so often pit one kind of foxiness (magnani- 
mous) against another (nasty)? Does comedy live 
on optimism, or can it thrive even in the absence 
of hope? Is there such a thing as a comic under- 
standing of life? {L} Wl 
Harold Skulsky 
Offered Fall 2002 

Reading and Writing Short Stories 
Reading of short stories from the point of view of 
the would-be writer, with special attention to such 
problems as dialogue, narration, characterization, 
and style. Writing includes analysis, imitation or 
parody, and original stories. {L} Wl 
Sara London, Michelle Hoover 
Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 

Making Americans: Jewish Writing in the United 
States 

An exploration of Jewish writing in early 20th- 
century America, focusing on the "life story" as a 
preferred form of fiction for Jewish-American writ- 
ers. How do these texts address the problem of 
becoming American? Are there certain conven- 
tions that mark the "typical" life story? How do 
some of these texts play with or critique those 
conventions? We will also consider the dilemma of 
modernity in these works: how do they address 
the anxieties associated with modern life? {L} Wl 
Beth Kissileff 
Offered Fall 2002 

170 The English Language 

An introductory exploration of the English lan- 
guage, its history, current areas of change, and 
future. Related topics such as how dictionaries are 
made and the structure of the modern publishing 
industry. Students will learn about editing, proof- 
reading, and page layout; the course will also en- 
tail a comprehensive review of grammar and 
punctuation. [3e] {L} Wl 
Douglas Pater 
Offered Spring 2004 



199 Methods of Literary Study 

This course teaches the skills that enable us to 
read literature with understanding and pleasure. 
By studying examples from a variety of periods 
and places, students will learn how poetry, prose 
fiction, and drama work, how to interpret them, 
and how to make use of interpretations by others. 
English 199 seeks to produce perceptive readers 
well equipped to take on complex texts. Readings 
in different sections will vary, but all will involve 
active discussion and frequent writing. {L} Wl 
4 credits 

Elizabeth Harries, James Hicks, Michael 
Thurston, Fall 2002 

Michael Gorra, Jefferson Hunter, Richard 
Millington, Spring 2003 
Offered both semesters each year 

LEVEL II 

Courses numbered 200-249. Open to all sopho- 
mores, juniors, and seniors, and to qualified first- 
year students. These courses in particular are de- 
signed to interest non-majors as well as majors. 

200 The English Literary Tradition I 

A study of the English literary tradition from the 
Middle Ages through the eighteenth century. Rec- 
ommended for sophomores. Open to first-year 
students with SAT verbal score of 710 or higher 
and students with English AP score of 4 or 5 [3a] 
{L} Wl 4 credits 
Eric Reeves, Sharon Seelig 
Offered Fall 2002 

201 The English Literary Tradition II 

A study of the English literary tradition from the 

nineteenth century to modern times. {L} Wl 

4 credits 

Nora E Crow, Luc Gilleman 

Offered Spring 2003 

207 The Technology of Reading and Writing 

An introductory exploration of the physical forms 
that knowledge and communication have taken in 
the West, from ancient oral cultures to modern 
print-literate culture. Our main interest will be in 
discovering how what is said and thought in a cul- 
ture reflects its available kinds of literacy and me- 






Ilish Language and Literature 



191 



of communication. Topics to include poetry 
memory in oral cultures; the invention of writ- 
j the invention of prose; literature and science 
script culture; the coming of printing; chang- 
concepts of publication, authorship, and origi- 
ty; movements toward standardization in lan- 
ge; political implications of different kinds and 
•Is of literacy. [3e] {L} 4 credits 
• Reeves 
ered Spring 2003 

} Introduction to Shakespeare 

course will explore the characteristic con- 
ns and techniques of Shakespearean drama. 
■ will include histories, comedies, tragedies, 

romances; in 2002-03 they will be chosen 
n among Richard III, Romeo and Juliet, Much 
i About Nothing, Henry VAs You Like It, 
'ello. Measure for Measure, King Lear, Antony 
I Cleopatra, and The Winter's Tale. Film ver- 
is of most plays will be shown. This course 
■s not satisfy the English Department's major 
lor requirement. Prerequisite: one college- 
;1 English course or permission of the instruc- 

{L} 4 credits 

Ham Oram 

ered Spring 2003 

L American Literature before 1865 

udy of American writers as they seek to define 
)le for literature in their changing society, 
rks by Emerson, Thoreau, Fuller, Hawthorne, 
Iville, Stowe, Douglass, Whitman, Dickinson, 
1 others. [3c] {L} 4 credits 
hard Millington 
ered Fall 2002 

3 American Literature from 1865 to 1914 

arvey of American writing after the Civil War, 
phasizing the rise of vernacular style, the emer- 
ce of "realism" and "naturalism," and the 
isformation of Romantic mythology and con- 
tion. Emphasis on writers who criticize and 
id apart from their societies. Fiction by Mark 
lin, Henry James, Sarah Orne Jewett, Kate 
)pin, Theodore Dreiser, and Gertrude Stein; 
?try by Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and E.A. 
)inson. [3c] {L} 4 credits 
■hael Thurston 
ered Spring 2003 



235 Modern American Writing 

American writing in the first half of the twentieth 
century, with emphasis on modernism. Fiction by 
Gather, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Hurston, Faulkner; 
poetry by Frost, Stevens, Eliot, Pound, and Bishop. 
[3d] {L} 4 credits 
Dean Flower 
Offered Fall 2003 

237 Recent American Writing 

Study of selected novelists and short story writers 
since 1945 with emphasis on Welty, Nabokov, 
Morrison, Stone, Simpson, TYler, Jen, Smiley, and 
others. [3d] {L} 4 credits 
Dean Flower 
Offered Fall 2002 

239 American Journeys 

A study of American narratives, from a variety of 
ethnic traditions and historical eras, that explore 
the meanings of the forms of movement — immi- 
gration, migration, boundary crossing — so char- 
acteristic of American life. Emphasis on each 
author's treatment of the complex encounter be- 
tween new or marginalized Americans and an es- 
tablished American culture, and on definitions or 
interrogations of what it might mean to be or be- 
come "American." {L} 4 credits 
Richard Millington 
Offered Spring 2003 

241 Postcolonial Literature 

An introduction to Anglophone fiction, non-fiction, 
poetry, drama and film from Africa, the Caribbean 
and South Asia in the aftermath of the British em- 
pire. Central concerns: literary-as-political re- 
sponses to histories of colonial dominance; the 
ambivalent relation to English linguistic, literary 
and cultural legacies; the agency of literature in 
the construction of national identity and the revi- 
sion of history; revaluations of hybridity; redefini- 
tions of race, gender and sexuality; global 
diasporas and U.S. imperialism. Readings include: 
Achebe, Soyinka, Aidoo, Naipaul. Walcott, Cliff, 
Rushdie, Kureishi, Arundhati Roy, some theoretical 
essays. [3d] {L} 4 credits 
Ambreen Hai 
Offered Fall 2002 



192 



English Language and Literat 



244 The Novel Now 

Representative works of recent fiction, chosen 
from across the English-speaking world with an 
eye to suggesting the range, variety, and possibili- 
ties of the contemporary novel. Readings will vary 
from year to year, but likely suspects include 
Salman Rushdie, Nadine Gordimer, Philip Roth, 
J. M. Coetzee, Toni Morrison, Pat Barker, Michael 
Ondaatje, Alice Munro, Don DeLillo, Peter Carey, 
and Cormac McCarthy, along with a selection of 
younger figures. [3d] {L} 4 credits 
Michael Gorra 
To be offered 2003-04 

LEVEL III 

Courses numbered 250-299. Open to sopho- 
mores, juniors, and seniors; first-year students 
admitted only with the permission of the instruc- 
tor. Recommended background: at least one En- 
glish course above the 100 level, or as specified in 
the course description. 

252 Sixteenth-Century Literature 

Topic: Passion and Despair in the English 
Renaissance 

Ovidian, Platonic, Petrarchan and Romance tradi- 
tions of love as they are questioned and reformu- 
lated by Renaissance writers. Lyric and narrative 
poetry by Wyatt, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Sidney, 
Spenser, Lady Mary Wroth and others. {L} 
4 credits 
William Oram 
Offered Spring 2003 

253 (HST 236) (C) Authority and Legitimacy 
in the Age of More and Shakespeare 

An examination of the texts and historical context 
of Shakespeare's Richard II, IHenty TV, Henry V, 
Richard III md King lear, More's Utopia and The 
His tor)' of Richard III, and other significant works 
of the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries 
touching on the questions of order, authority, and 
legitimacy. Admission by permission of the instruc- 
tors. {L/H} -4 credits 

Howard Wen tier (History), William Oram 
(English Language and Literature) 
Offered Fall 2002 



255 Seventeenth-Century Poetry 

An exploration of the remarkable variety of seve 
teenth-century lyric poetry, which includes voici 
secular and sacred, witty and devout, bitter and 
sweet, male and female. Attention to poetic forn 
conventions, and imagery; to response and adaj 
tion of those forms. Particular emphasis on 
Donne, Jonson, Herbert, and Marvell, set in the 
context of their time and their contemporaries. 
[3a] {L} 4 credits 
Harold Skulsky 
To be offered Spring 2004 

259 Pope, Swift, and Their Circle 

Discussion of the major figures, Pope and Swift 
together with their contemporaries Defoe, Prioi 
Addison, and Gay. [3b] {L} 4 credits 
Nora F. Crow 
Offered Spring 2003 

261 The 18th-century Novel 

A study of novels written in England from Aphra 

Behn to Jane Austen and Mary Shelley (1688— 

1818). Emphasis on the novelists' narrative mo 

els and choices, with special attention to novels 

and about women. [3b] (L) 

Douglas Patey 

To be offered 2003-04 

263 Romantic Poetry and Prose 

Concentration on selected poems of the major 
Romantics (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byr 
Shelley, Keats), with prose writings by the poets 
themselves and by Austen and Mary Shelley. [3f 
{L} 4 credits 
Patricia Skarda 
Offered Fall 2002 

265 The Victorian Novel 

The English novel from Dickens and Thackeray 
Conrad. Emphasis on the genre's formal devek 
ment — narrative voice and perspective, the us< 
of plot, the representation of consciousness — 
with some attention to social-historical concer' 
[3c] {L} 4 credits 
Michael Gorra 
Offered Fall 2002 



> 



jiglish Language and Literature 



193 



69 Modern British Poetry 

,ventieth-century poetry in England and Ireland, 
mphasis on W.B. Yeats, IS. Eliot, W.H. Auden, 
hilip Larkin, and Seamus Heaney, with some at- 
•ntion to such poets as Thomas Hardy, Ezra 
ound, D.H. Lawrence, Elizabeth Jennings, Stevie 
iiith, Ted Hughes, and Tony Harrison. Prerequi- 
te: 200 or a college course in poetry or permis- 
on of the instructor. [3d] {L} 4 credits 
Hchael Thurston 
ffered Fall 2002 

71 Joyce 

sctures, with occasional discussion, on 
ubliners, Portrait of the Artist, Ulysses, and 
mnegans Wake (selections). [3d] {L} 4 credits 
fferson Hunter 
ffered Spring 2003 

72 Recent British Literature 

onsideration of selected fiction and non-fiction 
ritten during the last twenty-five years or so; at- 
■ntion to memoirs as well. Some drama, and per- 
aps a little poetry. Course will have an eclectic 
wading list: it will not be a survey. Works by writ- 
rs such as John Banville, Alan Bennett, Angela 
arter, Alec Guinness, Kazuo Ishiguro, John Le 
arre, Andrew Miller, Emma Tennant, and Muriel 
park likely included. Largely discussion, with few 
'ctures. [3d] {L} 4 credits 
obert Hosmer 
ffered Spring 2003 

81 Modern American Poetry 

survey of the mainstream of American poetry 

om 1914 to the present, including the work of 

hot, Frost, Stevens, Moore, Williams, Hart Crane, 

lillay, Bishop, Lowell, Clampitt, Ashbery, Merrill, 

nd O'Hara. The emphasis is on literary analysis. 

3d]{L} 

lichael Thurston 

o be offered 2003-04 

'.78 Writing Women 

opic: Asian American Women Writers 
he body of literature written by Asian American 
■omen over the past one hundred years has been 
ecognized as forming a coherent tradition. What 
onditions enabled its emergence? How have the 



qualities and concerns of this tradition been de- 
fined? What makes a text central or marginal to 
the tradition? Writers to be studied include Amy- 
Tan, Sui Sin Far, Joy Kogawa, Chitra Divakaruni, 
Marilyn Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Jessica 
Hagedorn. [3d] {L} 4 credits. 
Floyd Cheung 
To be offered 2003-04 

285 Introduction to Contemporary Literary 
Theory 

An introduction to major theoretical questions and 
debates shaping the course of literary studies to- 
day, regarding what literature is, how literature is 
(to be) read, how literature functions within cul- 
ture and society, how theory and literature may 
interact. Attention to theory and practice of such 
20th-century movements as the New Criticism, 
structuralism, poststructuralism, Marxism, psy- 
choanalysis, as well as to challenges from femi- 
nism, queer, race and cultural studies. Prerequi- 
site: a college course in literature or permission of 
the instructor. [3e] {L} 4 credits 
Ambreen Hai 
Offered Spring 2003 

Advanced Courses in Writing 

Only one course in writing may be taken in any 
one semester except by permission of the chair. 
Courses in writing above the 100 level may be 
repeated for credit only with the permission of the 
instructor and the chair. For all writing courses 
above the 100 level, no student will be admitted to 
a section until she has applied at the English office 
in Wright Hall 101, submitted appropriate ex- 
amples of her work, and received permission of 
the instructor. Deadlines will be posted. 

290 Advanced Essay Writing: Crafting 
Creative Nonfiction 

A writers' group designed to encourage proficient 
students to look at their own and others' essays as 
works of art. Expertise in mechanical matters to 
be assumed from the start. Admission by permis- 
sion of the instructor. [3e] {L} 4 credits 
Sara London 
Offered Fall 2002 



194 



English Language and Literatur 



292 Reading and Writing Autobiography 

In this workshop, we will explore, through read- 
ing and through writing, the presentation of self in 
autobiography. A major focus will be on the inter- 
weaving of voice, structure, style, and content. As 
we read the work of ourselves and of others, we 
will be searching for strategies, devices, rhythms, 
patterns, and approaches that we might adapt in 
future writings. The reading list will consist of 
writings by twentieth-century women. Admission 
by permission of the instructor. [3e] {L} 4 credits 
Ann Boutelle 
Offered Spring 2003 

295 Writing Poetry 

Admission by permission of the instructor. [3e] 

{L} 4 credits 

Henri Cole 

Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 

296 Writing Short Stories 

Admission by permission of the instructor. [3e] 

{L} 4 credits 

Douglas Bauer 

Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 



and time from the authors'own: the visionary land 
scapes of a bereaved dreamer and the legendary 
past of Arthurian Britain. Prior familiarity with Ok 
or Middle English, or Old Norse, is highly wel- 
come. {L} 4 credits 
Craig R. Davis 
Offered Spring 2003 

306 Shakespeare 

A Midsummer Night's Dream, As You Like It, 
I Henry IV, Measure for Measure, King Lear, 
Macbeth, Coriolanus, The Tempest. Enrollment 
in each section limited to 25. Not open to first-yea 
students. [3a] {L} 4 credits 
Eric Reeves, Harold Skulsky 
Offered Fall 2002 

307 Shakespeare 

Romeo and Juliet, Richard II, Hamlet, Twelfth 
Night, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, Antony am 
Cleopatra, The Winter's Tale. Enrollment in each 
section limited to 25. Not open to first-year stu- 
dents. [3a] {L} 4 credits 
Harold Skulsky, Sharon Seelig 
Offered Spring 2003 



LEVEL IV 



Courses numbered 300-350. These courses are 
intended primarily for juniors and seniors who 
have taken at least two literature courses above the 
100-level. Other interested students need the per- 
mission of the instructor. 

302 Chaucer 

His art and his social and literary background. 

Emphasis on the Canterbury Tales. Students 

should have had at least two semester courses 

in literature. Enrollment limited to 25. [3a] {L} 

4 credits 

Nancy Coiner, Craig R. Davis 

Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 

304 Studies in Medieval Literature 

A close reading and comparison of two late medi- 
eval authors outside the tradition of Chaucer: the 
poet of Pearl and 5"/> Gawain and the Green 
Knight and Sir Thomas Malory. We will explore 
the contemporary conflicts of value as these were 
projected into imaginary worlds different in space 



308 Milton 

The last major Renaissance humanist in his mul- 
tiple role as revolutionary libertarian, master of 
baroque style, educational theorist, and Attorney 
for the Defense of God. Enrollment limited to 25. 
[3a] {L} 4 credits 
Sharon Seelig, Harold Skulsky 
Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 

310 Early Modern Writers and the Art of 
Renaissance Self-Fashioning 

A consideration of a wide variety of texts by 17th- 
century women — diaries, letters, and memoirs; 
poems (sonnets, personal and religious lyrics); 
drama; and prose fiction — with some of the fol- 
lowing questions in mind: What self-conceptions 
or forms of self-representation shape these writ- 
ings? To what extent are these texts informed by 
external considerations or genres — by romance, 
religious autobiography, poetic or narrative con- 1 
ventions — or by expectations of an ending? Whati ( 
kinds of assumptions or preconceptions does the 
modern reader bring to these texts? [3a] {L} 
Sharon Seelig 
Offered Spring 2003 



iglish Language and Literature 



195 



JO Studies in 20th-century Literature: 
esthetics and Politics in Postwar Britain 

tisuc and critical concerns generated by the 

elfare State. Readings from critical and social 

eon, drama, fiction. Discussion of documentary 

id feature films. Weekly evening screenings re- 

lired. [3d] {L} 4 credits 

m Gilleman 

fered Spring 2003 

36 Mystery, Cinema, Narrativity 

study of the way popular mystery genres — 
oi ooir, murder mysteries, detective stories — 
e related to complex narrative experimentation 
modern fiction and film. Emphasis on invesuga- 
>n and its generic conventions, intertextuality, 
jrody and self-reference, and theories of narra- 
e. Discussion of such films as The Maltese Fa I - 
w, Vertigo, The Third Man, The Passenger, and 
rinatown, along with fiction by E.C. Bently, 
>e, Borges, Nabokov, and Robbe-Grillet. Recom- 
ended background: one advanced literature 
•urse and one film studies course. Screening fee. 
d] {L} 4 credits 
van Flower 
fered Spring 2003 

11 Advanced Verse Writing 

|iis course is for students who have successfully 
impleted ENG 295 or have reached a compa- 
ble level of achievement in their own work, as 
easured by (a) awareness of available poetic 
Irms and (b) familiarity with representative texts 
; contemporary English-language poetry. The 
iairse will extend the three-part process of read- 
,g, composition, and careful editing begun in 
iG 295, and will focus on identifying and clarify- 
ig the individual student's poetic voice, as it 
aerges from that student s biographical and in- 
llectual concerns. Requirements will include 
•eping a common-place book; weekly writing 
signments, toward a term-end portfolio; and at 
ast one substantial essay and in-class presenta- 
>n based on a collection of poems by a contem- 
>rary poet. Prerequisite 295 or permission of the 
structor. Enrollment limited to 15. {L} (E). 
credits 
fnri Cole 
: fered Spring 2002 



LEVEL V 



Seminars. Seminars are open only to juniors and 
seniors, and admission is by permission of the 

instructor. 

All students who wish to take a seminar must 
apply at the English department office by the last 
day of the pre-registration period. The instructor 
will select the students admitted from these 
applicants. 

353 Advanced Studies in Shakespeare 

Shakespearean Tragedy. An intensive study of the 

ways in which Shakespeare embodies and extends 

the tradition of tragic literature. Prerequisite: 306. 

30", or a course in Renaissance literature. [3a] 

{L} 

Eric Reeves 

Offered Spring 2003 

362 Seminar: Satire 

A consideration of theoretical problems (defini- 
tions of satire, responses to satire, satiric strate- 
gies) followed by a study of the development of 
satire from Horace and Juvenal through 
Shakespeare, Swift, Pope, Austen, and Byron to 
Waugli, West, and Vonnegut. Some attention given 
to differences between male and female satirists. 
[3b] {L} 4 credits 
Nora F Crow 
Offered Fall 2002 

368 Wilde and Shaw 

A study of the fives and works of Oscar Wilde and 
George Bernard Shaw with particular emphasis on 
their idea of theater in relationship to social and 
literary conventions. Works to be studied will in- 
clude films of the plays as well as texts. (E) {L} 
4 credits 
Carol Christ 
Offered Fall 2002 

374 Virginia Woolf 

A close study of representative texts from the rich 
variety of Woolf s work: novel, essay, biography, 
and short story. Preliminary, essential attention to 
the life, with particular concern for the Victorian/ 
Edwardian world of Woolf 's early years and the 
Bloomsbury Group. Works to be studied will in- 
clude Mrs. Dalloway. To the Lighthouse. Orlando. 



196 



English Language and Literatu 



The Waves, Between the Acts, A Room of One's 
Own, and Three Guineas, as well as essays drawn 
from The Common Reader and stories. Supple- 
mentary readings from biographies of Woolf and 
her own letters, journals, and diaries. [3d] {L} 
4 credits 
Robert Hosmer 
Offered Spring 2003 

376 Contemporary British Women Writers 

Consideration of a number of contemporary 
women writers, mostly British, some well-estab- 
lished, some not, who represent a variety of con- 
cerns and techniques. Emphasis on the pleasures 
of the text and significant ideas — political, spiri- 
tual, human, and esthetic. Efforts directed at ap- 
preciation of individuality and diversity as well as 
contributions to the development of fiction. Au- 
thors likely to include Anita Brookner, Angela 
Carter, Isabel Colegate, Eva Figes, Penelope 
Fitzgerald, Molly Keane, Penelope Lively, Edna 
O'Brien, Barbara Pym, Jean Rhys, Muriel Spark, 
and Jeanette Winterson; some supplementary criti- 
cal reading. [3d] {L} 
Robert Hosmer 
To be offered Spring 2004 

388 Contemporary Poetry 

An introduction to the varied worlds of contempo- 
rary American poetry and a close study of work by 
five contemporary poets, such as Lucille Clifton, 
Li-Young Lee, Sharon Olds, Mary Jo Salter, Charles 
Simic. Please note that the final choice of poets 
will depend upon the schedule of readings in the 
Valley. Out-of-class activities will include such 
events as visiting a small press and attending local 
poetry readings. Prerequisite: a poetry-intensive 
course. 4 credits 
Ann Boutelle 
Offered Fall 2002 

391 Modern South Asian Writers 

A study of selected texts in the checkered tradition 
of South Asian literature in English, from the early 
poetry of Sarojini Naidu to the recent surge of 
Indian and diasporic writers and film-makers, 
such as Arundhati Roy and Hanif Kureishi. Topics 
include: the (post) colonial fashioning of identities; 
the interventions of women in nationalist dis- 
course; the crafting of a new idiom in English; the 



choices of genre and form (fiction, poetry, mem- 
oir, film); the problems of memory, historiogra- 
phy, trauma; diaspora and the making of "home. 
Writers may include: Anand, Narayan, Rao, 
Markandaya, Naipaul, Desai, Rushdie, Suleri, 
Ghosh, Kureishi, Mukherjee, Lahiri. Supplemen- 
tary readings in postcolonial theory and criticisn 
[3d] {L} 4 credits 
Ambreen Hai 
Offered Spring 2003 

Cross-listed and 
Interdepartmental Courses 

AAS 113 Survey of Afro-American Literature 
1746-1900 

AAS 245 Colloquium: The Harlem 
Renaissance 

AAS 248 Colloquium: Gender in the Afro- 
American Literary Tradition 

AMS 350 Seminar: Writing About American 
Society 

AMS 351 Seminar: Writing About American 
Society 

ARH 292 The Art and History of the Book 

CLT 255 Studies in the Nineteenth-Century 
Short Story 

CLT 267 African Women's Drama 

CLT 205 Twentieth-Century Literatures of 
Africa 

CLT 240 Childhood in Literatures of Africa 
and the African Diaspora 

CLT 268 Latina and Latin American Wome 
Writers 



CLT 300 Contemporary Literary Theory 
FLS 241 Genre/Period: Screen Comedy 






fish Language and Literature 


197 


291 Western Classics in Translation, 


Requirements for students who will graduate 


n Homer to Dante 


in 2004 or sooner 


Interdepartmental and Extradepartmental 


1. 200 and 201 (formerly 200d); 


rse Offerings. 


2. Semester courses on two of three major fig- 




ures: Chaucer (216), Shakespeare (111 or 


292 Western Classics in Translation, 


223), and Milton (228): 


n Chretien de Troyes to Tolstoy 


3. Eight additional courses, including one semes- 


Interdepartmental and Extradepartmental 


ter course from four of the following five areas: 


rse Offerings. 


a. Medieval or Renaissance; 




b. British or .American from 1 660 to 1830; 


i 201 Negotiating the Borderlands: Text, 


c. British or .American from 1 830 to 1 9 1 4; 


i, Music 


d. British, American or Commonwealth since 
1914; 

e. Writing, History of the Language, or Critical 


i 301 Contemporary Latina Theatre 




Theory. 


E 261 Writing for the Theatre 






Requirements to take effect with the class of 


) Special Studies 


2005 


4 credits 


Twelve semester courses are required for the ma- 


jred both semesters each year 


jor, distributed as follows: 




1. 199; 


id Special Studies 


2. Two courses before 1832; 


•edits 


3. Semester courses on two of three major fig- 


year course; Offered each year 


ures: Chaucer (216), Shakespeare (222 or 




223), and Milton (228); 


) Teaching Literature 


4. A seminar (the course chosen to satisfy #4 may 



|:ussion of poetry, short stories, short novels, 
as and drama with particular emphasis on the 
s in which one might teach them. Consider- 
n of the uses of writing and the leading of dis- 
Ision classes. MAT students and Seniors only. 
i 4 credits 
melScheer 
3red Spring 2003 

ie Major 

risers: Members of the Department. 

riser for Study Abroad: Jefferson Hunter. 

re are many paths into the English major: first 
r students may choose to take ENG 120 fol- 
ed by 199, or, if qualified, thev mav choose to 
i GLT 291 292 or ENG 200, 201 as well as 199. 
ients planning to major in English normally 
ENG 199 in their first year. Each of these 
irses counts toward the major. 



not count toward #2 ) : 
5. Six additional courses. 

In all cases: I'p to two courses in film, a foreign 
or comparative literature, or dramatic literature 
offered through the theater department may count 
toward the major. Up to two advanced writing 
courses may count toward the major. Only one 
colloquium (120) may count toward the major. 
English 1 18 does not count. No course counting 
toward the major may be taken for an S/l grade. 

We strongly recommend that all students take at 
least one historical survey sequence: English 200, 
201 or English 231, 233 or General Literature 
291, 292. We recommend that students interested 
in graduate school in English literature or in high 
school English teaching take both the British (200. 
201) and the .American (231, 233) surveys. Those 
considering graduate school should be aware that 
most doctoral programs in English require a read- 
ing knowledge of two foreign languages. 



198 



English Language and 



The Minor 



Graduate 



Requirements for students who will graduate 
in 2004 or sooner: 

The minor in English consists of five courses: a 
two-semester basis (ENG 200, 201 or GLT 291. 
GLT 292 or ENG 231. 233) plus three other En- 
glish courses above the 100 level chosen in con- 
sultation with the minor adviser. 

Requirements to take effect with the class of 
2005: 

The minor in English consists of six courses: En- 
glish 199; a two-semester survey (ENG 200, 201 
or GLT 291,292 or ENG 231. 233); plus three ad- 
ditional English courses chosen in consultation 
with the minor adviser, two of which must be 
above the 100 level. 



580 Graduate Special Studies 

Independent study for graduate students. 

sion by permission of the Chair. 

4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

580d Graduate Special Studies 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 



Honors 



Director: Robert Hosmer (2002-03); 
Luc Gilleman (2002-04). 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 



Applicants to honors (which is done in addition to 
the requirements of the major) must have an aver- 
age of B+ or above in the courses they count to- 
ward the major, and an average of B or above in 
all other courses. During the senior year they will 
present a thesis, of which the first complete formal 
draft will be due on the first day of the second 
semester. After the readers of the thesis have pro- 
vided students with their evaluations of this draft, 
the student will have time to revise her work in 
response to their suggestions. The final completed 
version of the thesis will be due a week after 
spring vacation, to be followed during April by the 
student's oral presentation and discussion of her 
work. Students in honors will normally be given 
priority in seminars. 



199 



Environmental Science and Policy 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



rector 

H. Allen Curran, Professor of Geology 

ting Directors 

ginia Hayssen, Professor of Biological Sciences 

(Fall 2002) 
John Burk, Professor of Biological Sciences 

(Spring 2003) 

ogram Coordinator 

wn Greene Norchi 

Ivisers 

Elliot Fratkin, Associate Professor of 

Anthropology 

C. John Burk, Professor of Biological Sciences 
1 Virginia Hayssen, Professor of Biological 

Sciences 
omas S. Litwin, Adjunct Associate Professor of 

Biological Sciences and Director, Clark Science 

Center 

>bert B. Merritt, Professor of Biological Sciences 
teban Monserrate, Laboratory Instructor in 

Biological Sciences 



**' Paulette Peckol, Professor of Biological 

Sciences 
L. David Smith, Assistant Professor of Biological 

Sciences 
Stephen G. Tilley, Professor of Biological Sciences 
Shizuka Hsieh, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Robert G. Linck, Professor of Chemistry 
f 2 Katherine L. Queeney, Assistant Professor of 

Chemistry 
Mark Aldrich, Professor of Economics 
f Randall Bartlett, Professor of Economics 
Domenico Grasso, Professor and Chair of 

Engineering 
Donna Riley, Assisant Professor of Engineering 
Leslie King, Assistant Professor, (Environmental 

Science and Policy and Sociology) 
John B. Brady, Professor of Geology 
t 2 H. Robert Burger, Professor of Geology- 
Robert M. Newton, Professor of Geology 
Amy Larson Rhodes, Assistant Professor of Geology 
f ' Gregory White, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

Government 
David Newbury; Professor of History and of African 

Studies 



e environmental science and policy (ES&P) 
nor is designed for students with a serious inter- 
t in environmental issues and a commitment to 
ientifically-based problem solving and policy 
alysis. The minor consists of six courses chosen 
tli the guidance and approval of an ES&P minor 
iviser Interested students are urged to meet with 
p Director, Coordinator and/or an ES&P adviser 
rly in their academic planning. 

uquirements: six courses including one course 
)m each of the following groups: Chemistry, 
ology, Geology, and Environmental Policy, plus 



an elective in consultation with the minor adviser. 
The senior seminar, EVS 300, or the special stud- 
ies, EVS 400 (4-credit option), is also required. A 
course in statistics (e.g. MTH 245 or the equiva- 
lent) is recommended. Appropriate Smith courses 
not listed below, Five College courses, or courses 
taken at other insutuuons and through summer 
and/or semester-away programs may be counted 
for the minor with pre-approval of the adviser. 
Students must satisfy- the prerequisites for all 
courses included in their minor program. No 
more than three of the six courses may be taken at 
other insutuuons. 



200 



Environmental Science and Poli< 



EVS 300 Seminar in Environmental Science 
and Policy 

Examination of the impact of human populations 
on natural systems, the development of environ- 
mental problems, and the use of environmental 
science in policy creation. Case studies and a 
group project are used to explore the translation 
of scientific theory and research into public edu- 
cation and policy. Topics include: landscape ecol- 
ogy, natural system perturbation, conservation 
biology, sustainability, pollution, environmental 
health risk assessment, natural resource econom- 
ics, and the formulation of environmental regula- 
tions. Prerequisite: all courses completed or the 
concurrent for the Environmental Science and 
Policy minor or by permission of the instructor. 
{S/N} 4 credits 
L. David Smith 
Offered Spring 2003 

EVS 400 Special Studies 

1-4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

232 World Population 

This course will introduce students to environ- 
mental, economic, feminist, and nationalist per- 
spectives on population growth and decline. We 
will examine current populations trends and pro- 
cesses (fertility, mortality, and migration) and con- 
sider the social, political, economic, and environ- 
mental implications of those trends. The course 
will also provide an overview of various sources of 
demographic data as well as basic demographic 
methods. Cross-listed with Environmental Science 
and Policy. {S} 4 credits 
Leslie King 
Offered Fall 2002 

332 Environment and Society 

This seminar will explore the relationship between 
people and their natural environments. Using so- 
ciological theories, we will examine how environ- 
mental issues are constructed and how they are 
contested. In examining a series of particular envi- 
ronmental problems, we will consider how social, 
political and economic structures are related to 
environmental degradation. Cross-listed with Envi- 
ronmental Science and Policy. {S} 4 credits 
Leslie King 
Offered Fall 2002 



CHEMISTRY 

CHM 150 Environmental Chemistry 

GEO 301 Aqueous Geochemistry 7 

CHM 347 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

ECOLOGY 

BIO 258 Conservation Biology Colloquium 

BIO 260 Principles of Ecology 7 and lab 

BIO 264 Marine Ecology and lab 

BIO 356 Plant Ecology and lab 

BIO 364 Topics in Environmental Biology: 

Coral Reefs: Past, Present and Future 

GEOLOGY 

GEO 105 Natural Disasters 

GEO 108 Oceanography 

GEO 109 The Environment 

GEO 1 1 1 Introduction to Earth Processes 

and History 
GEO 121 Geology in the Field 
FYS 1 3 1 Environmental Issues on Campus 
GEO 309 Groundwater Geology 
GEO 3 1 1 Environmental Geophysics 
GEO 355 Geology Seminar: Coral Reefs: 

Past, Present and Future 






ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY 

ANT 230 Population and Environment in Africa 

ANT 236 Economy Ecology, and Society 

ANT 243 Colloquium in Political Ecology 7 

ECO 224 Environmental Economics 

GOV 254 Politics of the Global Environment 

GOV 306 Politics and the Environment 

PPL 230 Public Policy and Natural Resources \ 

PPL 260 Global Warming: Science and Policy 

PPL 303 Seminar in Public Policy of Marine an 
Coastal Resources 



Electives 



Elective courses can be chosen from courses lis 1 
for the Environmental Science and Policy minoi 
and outside the minor with consultation and ap 
proval of the minor adviser. Examples are: 
ANT 348 Seminar: Topics in Development 

Anthropology 
EGR 1 10 Fundamentals of Environmental 

Engineering 
EGR 230 Public Policy and Engineering 
EGR 315 Ecohydrologv 



, 



rironmental Science and Policy 201 

K 346 Hydrosystems Engineering 

R 360 Chemical and Environmental Reaction 

Engineering 
t 299 Ecology and History in Africa 
I 304 Colloquium in Applied Ethics: Science, 

Policy and Society 
L 207 Politics of Public Policy 
1 1 20 Public Policy Analysis 
C232 World Population 

ff-Campus Programs 

dents may elect to take two to three of their 
arses for the minor outside Smith College by 
•ticipation in an environmentally oriented, off- 
npus program. Relevant Smith approved pro- 
urns include, but are not limited to, Columbia 
iversity's Biosphere 2, Duke University's Organi- 
ion for Tropical Studies, SEA Semester, and The 
100I for Field Studies. Courses from other pro- 
ims may also be eligible for credit with approval 
m the minor adviser. 



202 



Ethics 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Advisers t 2 Myron Peretz Glazer, Professor of Sociology 

Thomas S. Derr, Professor of Religion and Biblical Elizabeth V. Spelman, Professor of Philosophy 
Literature, Director 



This minor will offer students the opportunity to 
draw together courses from different departments 
whose major focus is on ethics, and so to concen- 
trate a part of their liberal arts education on those 
questions of right and wrong that reside in nearly 
every field of inquiry. Background in the history 
and methods of ethical reasoning will be com- 
pleted by the study of normative and applied ethics 
in selected areas of interest. 

Requirements: PHI 222, and any four other 
courses selected from the following list, with the 
approval of the faculty adviser, to provide a par- 
ticular focus: 



ANT 344 Anthropology and Medical Ethics 

PHI 304 Colloquium in Applied Ethics 

REL250 Social Ethics I 

REL251 Social Ethics II 

REL 353 Seminar: Medical Ethics 

REL 354 Seminar: Business Ethics 

SOC203 Qualitative Methods 

With the approval of the faculty advisers, approp 
ate courses from other colleges may be substi- 
tuted. 






m 



Exercise and Sport Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



ssors 


Karen Klinger, B.A. 


Dnald Steven Siegel, Ed.D. 


Bonnie May, M.S. 


mes II. Johnson, Ph.D., Chair 


Deborah Neubauer 


ara Brehm-Curtis, Ed.D 


Phil Nielsen 




Lynn Oberbillig, M.B.A. 


>ciate Professor 


Suzanne Payne, M.Ed. 


;tine M. Shelton, M.S. 


Nansee Rothenberg 




Susan Shallcross 


ng Assistant Professor 


Kelli Steele, M.S. 


M. Stangl, Ph.D. 


David Stillman 




Ruth Taylor 


irers 


Lisa Thompson 


Bacon, M.A. 




Bierwert, B.S. 


Teaching Fellows 


ueline Blei, M.S. 


Donielle Albrecht 


ard Cesario 


Shannon Bryant 


i Coffey, M.A. 


Amanda Cuiffo 


5 Collins 


Alison D. Derrick 


lie Constantilos, RN, CPT 


Richard Moller 


>tine Davis, M.S. 


Lauren Rigney 


eeley 


Emma R. Sandberg 


?en Garde 


Philip Schmehl 


er Haskvitz 


Johanna Van der Hulst 


1 Johnson 





eory Courses 



Introduction to Exercise and Sport 
lies 

iverview of the disciplines that address physi- 
ictivity and sport. The course takes into ac- 
■it the general effects of physical activity and 

one studies and analyzes these experiences, 
rse content includes an examination of behav 
L sociocultural, biophysical experiences and 
essional possibilities. 4 credits 

Bacon. Jane Stangl 
>red Fall 2002 



107 Emergency Care 

The ultimate goal is to teach emergency medical 
care that will enable the student to a) recognize 
symptoms of illness and/or injuries; b) implement 
proper procedures; c) administer appropriate 
care; d) achieve and maintain proficiency in all 
skills; e) be responsible and behave in a profes- 
sional manner; f) become certified in Community 
First Aid and CPR. Enrollment limited to 14. 
2 credits 
Kelli Steele 
Offered Spring 2003 

130 Stress Management 

The physical and psychological components of 
stress, identification of personal stress response 



204 



Exercise and Sport Stud) 



patterns, and techniques for daily stress manage- 
ment. Enrollment limited to 20. 1 credit 
Barbara Brehm-Curtis 
Offered Spring 2003 

140 Health Behavior 

The influence of behavior on health and well-be- 
ing. Students will examine the way in which factors 
such as nutrition and dietary habits, stress percep- 
tion and response, and physical activity interact 
with the physiological processes of health, disease, 
and aging. {N} 4 credits 
Barbara Brehm-Curtis 
Offered Fall 2002 

150 Nutrition and Health 

An introduction to the science of human nutrition. 
We will study digestion, absorption, and transpor- 
tation of nutrients in the body, and the way nutri- 
ents are used to support growth and development 
and maintain health. We will also examine how 
personal dietary choices affect nutritive quality of 
the diet and health of an individual. The relation- 
ship between diet and health will be explored 
throughout this course. Special topics will include 
diet and physical fitness, weight control, vegetari- 
anism, and women's nutrition concerns. High 
school chemistry recommended but not required. 
{N} 4 credits 
Barbara Brehm-Curtis 
Offered Spring 2003 

175 Applied Exercise Science 

A experiential course designed to introduce stu- 
dents to applied exercise physiology and kinesiol- 
ogy. Such subjects as energy expenditure, energy 
systems, aerobic power, effort perception, applied 
anatomy, and training principles are studied using 
a system of lecture and laboratory' sessions. En- 
rollment limited to 20. (E) {N} 2 credits 
james Johnson and Esther Haskvitz 
Offered Fall 2002 

175j Applied Exercise Science 

Same description as 175 above. 
Esther Hash itz and Richard Moller 
Offered Interterm both years 



200 Sport: In Search of the American Drea 

A study of whether sport has served to promote 
inhibit ethnic/minority participation in the Amei 
can Dream. Biological and cultural factors will 
examined to ascertain the reasons for success h 
some groups and failure by others as high-level ' 
participants. The lives of major American sport 
figures will be studied in depth to determine th< 
costs assessed and rewards bestowed on those 
who battled racial, ethnic, and/or sexual oppre, 
sion in the athletic arena. {H/S} 4 credits 
Christine Shelton 
Offered Spring 2003 

IDP 208 Women's Medical Issues 

A study of topics and issues relating to women: 
health, including menstrual cycle, contraceptio 
sexually transmitted diseases, pregnancy, abort 
menopause, depression, eating disorders, nutr 
tion and cardiovascular disease. While the cou: 
focus will primarily be on the physiological as- 
pects of these topics, some social, ethical and 
litical implications will be considered includin 
the issues of violence and the media's represer 
tion of women. {N} 4 credits 
Leslie Jaffe (Health Sen ices) 
Offered Fall 2002 

215 Physiology of Exercise 

A study of body function during exercise. Emp 
sis is on the physiological responses and adap 
tions that accompany single and repeated bou 
physical activity. Additional emphasis is given t ; 
the exercising female, environmental effects, 
genie aids, training, and the therapeutic effect 
exercise. Prerequisite: BIO 104 or 111, or pel 
sion of the instructor. Smdents who successful 
complete this course receive credit toward the 
major in biology. {N} 4 credits 
Esther Haskvitz 
Offered Fall 2002 

220 Psychology of Sport 

An examination of sport from a psychological 5- 
spective. Topics include the role of stress. mo,a- 1 
tion, and personality in performance. Attentio, 
will also be given to perceptual, cognitive. an< 
behavioral strategies that may be used to enh; R 



xercise and Sport Studies 



205 



enlevement level. Prerequisite: PSY 1 1 1 {S} 

credits 

im Bacon 

ffered Spring 2003 

00 Seminar: Topics in Socio-Cultural Sport 
tudies 

opic.A Cultural Analysis of Sport 

1 this seminar, cultural studies concepts and criti- 
il theories will be employed to investigate sport 
id physical activity. In essence we will be explor- 
g the meaning of sport as a cultural form. The 
)urse will make extensive use of contemporary 
ledia and textual analysis, hence "reading" be- 
veen producers, texts and consumers. By paying 
tention to sport as culture, we will note its role 

i reproducing dominant cultural themes and 
leologies; further exploring how sport creates, 
>sists and/or potentially transforms social forces, 
rerequisite: ESS 100 or ESS 200 or permission of 
e instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. (E) 
I./H/S} 4 credits 
\neM. Stangl 
ffered Spring 2003 

00 Special Studies 

to 4 credits 

ffered both semesters each year 



'erformance Courses- 
Jredit 



^rformance courses are offered for credit in a 
ide variety of activities. Each class is designed to 
; ihance the student's physical skills, fitness, 
howledge of human movement, and understand- 
g of the role of physical activity in a healthy 
'estyle. Each course encompasses a combination 
instruction in technique, readings, lecture, and 
scussion. In general, each section involves an 
'erage of two scheduled hours per week. Stu- 
nts may count no more than four performance 
burse credits toward the degree. Courses with 
ultiple sections may be repeated for credit, but 
dividual course sections may not be repeated 
i credit. 



901 Aquatic Activities 

Beginning Swimming 

A course in the development of basic swimming 
skills and the conquering of fear of the water. Pri- 
ority will be given to establishing personal safety 
enhancing skills in the water. Persons enrolling in 
this course will learn about the basic principles of 
swimming in terms of buoyancy and propulsion. 
The primary performance goals are survival swim- 
ming skills and passage of the Smith College 
Swimming Test. A person who can swim at least 
one length of the pool is not eligible for this 
course. Limited to 12 novice or non-swimmers. 
1 credit 
Karen Klinger 
Offered both semesters 

Advanced Beginning Swimming 
This course will focus on the improvement of 
swimming skills. Performance goals include being 
able to swim all 4 strokes and the turns associated 
with those strokes at a level that surpasses initial 
performance by the end of the semester. Students 
are assessed at the beginning and end of the se- 
mester with the aid of video feedback. Prerequi- 
site: ability to swim at least one length of the pool. 
Enrollment limited to 14. 1 credit 
Craig Collins 
Offered both semesters 

Intermediate Swimming 

Theory and performance of swimming. Swimming 

techniques including strokes, turns, and survival 

methods. Enrollment limited to 18. 1 credit 

Craig Collins 

Offered Fall 2002 

Springboard Diving 

The understanding of the principles and develop- 
ment of diving skills necessary to perform at least 
10 different dives from five categories. Enrollment 
limited to eight. 1 credit 
Kim Bierwert 
Offered both semesters 

SCUBA Diving 

The use and care of equipment, safety, and the 
physiology and techniques of SCUBA diving. 
A series of open-water dives leading to NAUI 



206 



Exercise and Sport Studi 



certification is available. Prerequisite: satisfactory 
swimming skills and permission of the instructor. 
There is a fee. Enrollment limited to 17. 1 credit 
David Stillman 
Offered both semesters 

Swim Conditioning 

Swimming workouts to improve physical fitness. 
Stroke improvement, exercise program design, 
and a variety of aquatic training modalities will 
also be included. Intermediate swimming ability 
required. Enrollment limited to 20. 1 credit 
Craig Collins 
Offered Spring 2003 

Aqua-Aerobics 

This fun-filled class teaches the value of vertical 

exercise in the water while shattering the myth that 

it is primarily for senior citizens or people with 

injuries. All exercises are choreographed to music 

that is upbeat and motivating. Designed to have fun 

and educate, this class is a great way to start your 

day. Enrollment limited to 20. 1 credit 

Craig Collins 

Offered both semesters 

905 Water Safety 



Kim Bierwert 
Offered Spring 2003 

910 Badminton 

The development of badminton skills, principles, 
evolution, strokes, and strategy. Enrollment limit* 
to 16. Course will meet first 7 weeks of the seme: 
ter. 1 credit 
Phil Nielsen 
Offered Spring 2003 

910j Badminton 

A repetition of 910. Enrollment limited to 16. 
1 credit 
Phil Nielsen 
Offered Interterm 

920 Fencing 

Fencing I 

The basic techniques of attack and defense, foot- 
work, rules, equipment, strategies, and techniqui 
involved in foil fencing. A brief historical back- 
ground of the tradition and origins of fencing. 
Enrollment limited to 16 per section. 1 credit 
Jacqueline Blei 
Offered both semesters 



Lifeguard Training 

American Red Cross Certification in Lifeguard 
Training and Basic First Aid and CPR for the Pro- 
fessional Rescuer. The Waterfront Lifeguard Mod- 
ule will also be taught if time permits. Prerequi- 
sites: 500 yard swim using crawl, breast and side 
strokes; retrieval of 10 lb. brick from 7 ft. depth; 
and treading water for two minutes using legs only. 
Enrollment limited to 12. 2 credits 
To be announced 
Offered both semesters 

Water Safety Instructor 
Instruction in techniques, theory, and teaching 
methods of swimming to prepare participants to 
teach swimming. American Red Cross certification 
upon successful completion of the course. Prereq- 
uisites: Rescue and safety skills, and swimming 
skills (crawl stroke, elementary backstroke, side- 
stroke, breaststroke, survival stroke, and surface 
dive) at ARC Level VI proficiency. Enrollment lim- 
ited to 15. 2 credits 



Fencing II 

A review of footwork, simple attacks and lateral 
parries progressing to compound attacks and 
strategies. Circular Parries, Riposte and In-Direc 
Riposte will be included in the defense. The 
course will conclude with a tournament at a 
neighboring school or club. Prerequisite: Foil 
Fencing or permission of the instructor. Enroll- 
ment limited to 16. 1 credit 
Jacqueline Blei 
Offered Spring 2003 

925 Golf 

Golfl 

An introduction to the game of golf. Taught 
"green to tee," this course will teach the basic 
mechanics of the swing as well as correct club 
selection. The initial focus of the course will be 
directed to the "short game" and develop towan 
appropriate use of mid-, and long irons, concluc 
ing with woods/metals. Applied rules of golf and : 



iercise and Sport Studies 



207 



Iquette will also be addressed. Field trip, or 
jort course (par 3) experience may be sched- 
ed. Equipment is provided. Class meets first 
ven weeks of the fall semester. In the spring 
mester, class meets last 6 weeks. Enrollment 
nited to 12 per section. 1 credit 
zFeeley Fall 2002 
> be Announced, Spring 2003 
fered both semesters 

fa 

signed to further develop the student's golf 
king, this course will follow a 'green to tee" ap- 
joach with emphasis on the mid- to long irons, 
)ods/metals, and shot-making. Applied rules of 
: If etiquette will be incorporated with the intent 
apply course management strategies. Field trips 
: local ranges and courses are anticipated. Equip- 
ent is provided. Class will meet in the last six 
!?eks of spring semester only and is designed 
;th the continuing Golf I student in mind. Prereq- 
fcite: Golf I or an entry 7 level Skills Test. Enroll- 
!?nt limited to 10 per section. 1 credit 
\iith Strong 
| fered Spring 2003 

Win 

. r students with a relatively proficient swing, this 

• urse is designed to enhance further skill devel- 

• ment and enrich on-course management skills. 
lib selection, swing proficient and a general 
lowledge of rules and etiquette are expected. 
evious on-course experience is also expected. 

' ne will be spent on the course, pending 
"ather. Equipment is provided for those who do 
: I have (access to) clubs. Class meets first seven 
teks of the fall semester. In the spring semester, 
Iss meets last 6 weeks. Prerequisite: Golf I and 
Mf II, or permission of the instructor pending 
:ill level. Enrollment limited to 10 per section, 
'is class was formerly Golf II. 
:redit 
/ w Stangl 
'fered both semesters 

.0 Equitation 

leries of courses in hunter seat equitation and 
I sic dressage. Attention also given to safety, use 
:d care of equipment, equine health and stable 
ement. Students must attend registration 



session to be announced in AcaMedia. 

All sections are to be arranged. There is a fee. 

Equitation I 

For students in their first semester of riding at 

Smith. Sections range from beginner to advanced 

levels on the flat and over fences. 1 credit 

Suzanne Payne, Doreen Garde, Susan 

Shallcross, and Ruth Taylor 

Offered both semesters 

Equitation II 

For students in their second semester of riding at 
Smith. Sections range from advanced beginner to 
advanced levels on the flat and over fences. Pre- 
requisite: Equitation I. 
1 credit 

Suzanne Payne, Doreen Garde, Susan 
Shallcross, and Ruth Taylor 
Offered both semesters 

Equitation III 

For students in their third semester of riding at 

Smith. Low intermediate to advanced levels on the 

flat and over fences. Prerequisite: Equitation II. 

1 credit 

Suzanne Payne, Doreen Garde, Susan 

Shallcross, and Ruth Taylor 

Offered both semesters 

Equitation TV 

For students in their fourth semester of riding at 

Smith. Intermediate to advanced levels on the flat 

and over fences. Prerequisite: Equitation III. 

1 credit 

Suzanne Payne, Doreen Garde, Susan 

Shallcross, and Ruth Taylor 

Offered both semesters 

935 Outdoor Skills 

A course designed to teach the student the basics 
of outdoor travel by foot and canoe. In addition to 
canoeing and backpacking techniques, students 
will learn some classic woodcraft skills, outdoor 
cooking, first aid, and orienteering. Upon success- 
ful completion of the course students should 
achieve sufficient outdoor skills to be comfortable 
and safe when traveling outdoors. Students should 
plan for at least one overnight weekend trip. En- 
rollment limited to H. 2 credits 



I 



208 



Exercise and Sport Studi . 



James Johnson, Fall 

To be announced, Spring 

Offered both semesters 

940 Outdoor Adventure 

Canoeing 

An introduction to solo and tandem paddling. Stu- 
dents learn mostly flatwater paddling skills. Stu- 
dents are also taught such touring skills as map 
reading, portaging, planning, equipment, and 
cooking. Class meets the first 8 weeks of the fall 
semester. Prerequisite: satisfactory swimming 
skills. Enrollment limited to 12. 1 credit 
Johanna Van derHulst 
Offered Fall 2002 

Canoe Touring 

Class meets weekly in preparation for a weekend 
trip. Students will learn paddling, orienteering, 
and woodcraft skills. There is a small fee. Class 
meets first 7 weeks of the fall semester. In the 
spring semester, class meets the last 6 weeks. Pre- 
requisite: satisfactory swimming skills and a good 
state of physical fitness. Enrollment limited to 10. 
1 credit 

Johanna Van derHulst, Fall 
Esther Haskvitz, Shannon Bryant, Spring 
Offered both semesters 

Whitewater Kayaking 

An introduction to solo Whitewater kayaking. This 
class begins in the pool and pond with basic pad- 
dling skills, and progresses to local fast water riv- 
ers. Students should expect to run Class II rapids. 
Course will meet the first 7 weeks of the fall se- 
mester. In the spring semester, class meets last 6 
weeks. Prerequisite: satisfactory swimming skills. 
Enrollment limited to 8 per section. 1 credit 
Scottjohnson 
Offered both semesters 

Whitewater Canoeing 

An introduction to solo and tandem Whitewater 
canoeing. This class is taught on local rivers dur- 
ing the spring. Class meets the last 6 weeks of the 
semester. Prerequisite: Canoeing or permission of 
the instructor, plus satisfactory swimming skills. 
Enrollment limited to 10. 1 credit 
James Johnson 
Offered Spring 2003 



Coastal Kayaking 
This course is designed to introduce sea kayakin; 
to the novice. Ocean paddling, navigation, safe 
exiting, equipment, and paddle techniques are 
covered. Prerequisite: satisfactory swimming 
skills. Enrollment limited to 1 1. Course will meet 
the first 7 weeks of the fall semester. In the spring 
semester, class meets last 6 weeks. 1 credit 
To he announced 
Offered both semesters 

Rock Climbing 
The objective of this course is to teach students tl 
fundamentals of rock climbing. This will include 
familiarity with the equipment involved as well as 
proficiency with technical climbing skills, knots, 
anchors and belaying. Safety issues will be a stror 
emphasis in this course. The majority of class tim 
will take place on the Ainsworth Gym Climbing 
Wall. There will also be 2-3 off-campus trips held 
during class times to practice anchor setting in th 
outdoors. Please note that this class will serve onl 
as a basic introduction to outdoor climbing and 
anchor setting and will not "certify" or prepare 
the student for the full range of outdoor climbing, 
scenarios. For this, additional instruction is rec- 
ommended. Enrollment limited to 12 per section. 
1 credit 
Scottjohnson 
Offered both semesters 

945 Physical Conditioning 

Aerobics 

Exercise to music. Various exercise styles will be 
introduced. This class will also cover basic exer- 
cise principles, injury prevention, and the funda- 
mentals of exercise program design. The goal of 
this course is to enable students to enter any 
group fitness setting with confidence. Enrollment 
limited to 35. 1 credit 
Rosalie Constantilos 
Offered both semesters 

Kickboxing 

Kickboxing consists of movement patterns that 
include the entire body. These patterns will be j 
performed at an intensity that should produce a I 
conditioning or training effect. Basic anatomy and 
physiology, monitoring exercise intensity, safety, i 



rcise and Sport Studies 



1W 



iry prevention, basic nutrition, body composi- 
i, and equipment use will be reviewed. The 
I will begin with a warm-up, followed by car- 
vascular training through the punches and 
ks involved with kickboxing, a cool-down, ab- 
ninal work, and flexibility. Enrollment limited 
!0 per section. 1 credit 
ma Sandberg, To be announced 
ered both semesters 

f-Paced Fitness 

ntroduction to the principles and methods of 
bdng to improve aerobic endurance. Students 
tested for fitness level at the beginning and end 
le semester. Each student designs and follows 
ndividualized aerobic conditioning program. 
Dllment limited to 20. 1 credit 
na Sandberg, Fall 
] a Coffey, Spring 
jred both semesters 

sical Conditioning 

urse designed to teach the basics of functional 
ss. Aerobic and anaerobic exercises are em- 
ized. Students are also taught the fundamen- 
oi exercise training including basic principles, 
cise prescription, and the therapeutic aspects 
;ercise. Students are expected to exercise out- 
of class. Enrollment limited to 14. 1 credit 
ielle Albrecht, Fall 

Welle Albrecht, Lauren Rigney, Spring 
red both semesters 

s-Training 

irse designed to introduce students to aerobic 

inaerobic training through different modes of 

:ise. The primary emphasis is aerobic training 

ing three modes of exercise. Principles of 

:ise, ergometry, and fiber type training are 

wed. In addition to class activities, students 

xpected to perform one weekly exercise ses- 

outside of class. Enrollment limited to 14. 

dit 

n Derrick, Amanda Cuiffo, Fall 

nda Cuiffo, Lauren Rigney, Spring 

ed both semesters 

Physical Conditioning 
etition of 945. 1 credit 
elle Albrecht 
ed Interterm 



950 Rowing 

An introduction to crew and sculling techniques. A 
variety of boats will be utilized including singles. 
doubles, and fours. Classes will be taught on Para- 
dise Pond and the Connecticut River. Course will 
meet the first 7 weeks of the fall semester. In the 
spring semester, class meets last 6 weeks. Prereq- 
uisite: satisfactory swimming skills. Enrollment 
limited to 12 per section. 1 credit 
Alison Derrick 
Offered both semesters 

955 Self Defense 

Self Defense I 

Progressive development of physical and mental 
self-defense skills and strategies. Personal protec- 
tion awareness, situation evaluation, and effective 
communication will be emphasized. Other topics 
include assertiveness training, date rape, and per- 
sonal defense weapons. Enrollment limited to 20 
per section. 1 credit 
Nansee Rothenberg 
Offered both semesters 

KungFu 

Indonesian Kung-Fu is a traditional martial art that 
offers students physical fitness, coordination, in- 
creased focus, energy and awareness, self-disci- 
pline and personal growth. This course includes 
meditation, breath and energy awareness, physical 
conditioning, stretching, self-defense, choreo- 
graphed sparring combinations and forms. Enroll- 
ment limited to 20. 1 credit 
Nansee Rothenberg 
Offered both semesters 

960 Squash 

Squash I 

Instructions in basic strokes, rules, tactics, and 
strategy designed to allow the student to progress 
to a USSRA level 2.0 to 2.5 (Beginner). Enrollment 
limited to 12 per section. 1 credit 
Jacqueline Bleu Bonnie May. Fall 
Jacqueline Blei, Spring 
Offered both semesters 



210 



Exercise and Sport Sti 



Squash II 

Development in accuracy and skill in executing 
shots, tactics, strategy, marking and refereeing, 
designed to allow the student to progress to a 
USSRA level 2.5 to 30 (Intermediate). Prerequi- 
site: Beginning Squash or permission of the in- 
structor. Enrollment limited to 12. 1 credit 
Tim Bacon 
Offered Spring 2003 

965 Tai Chi 

TaiChil 

An introduction to the Chinese martial art that was 
developed over 300 years ago. Emphasis will be 
on learning and understanding the unique move- 
ments of Chen Taijiquan, proper practice for 
health, and self-defense applications. No prerequi- 
sites. Enrollment limited to 20 per section. 
1 credit 

Richard Cesario 
Offered both semesters 

Tai Chi II 

Twenty-four posture Tai chi, a standardized form 

from mainland China. Prerequisite: Tai chi I or 

permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited 

to 20 per section. 1 credit 

Richard Cesario 

Offered Spring 2003 

970 Tennis 

Tennis I 

The development of beginning tennis skills, tactics 

and strategy designed to allow the student to 

progress to a USTA player rating level of 2.0 to 2.5. 

The USA Tennis I curriculum will be followed. 

Enrollment limited to 16 per section. 1 credit 

Jacqueline Blei, Amanda Cuiffo. Richard Moller, 

Fall 

Jacqueline Blei, Richard Moller, Spring 

Offered both semesters 

Tennis II 

The development of intermediate tennis skills and 
tactics, including both singles and doubles, 
through friendly competition designed to allow the 
student to progress to a USTA player rating level of 
2.5 to 3.0. Prerequisite: Tennis I or permission of 



the instructor. Enrollment limited to 16 per se 
tion. 1 credit 

Christine Davis, Christine Shelton, Fall 
Christine Davis, Amanda Cuiffo, Spring 
Offered both semesters 

Tennis III 

The development of advanced tennis skills, tac 
and strategy designed to allow the player to 
progress to a USTA player rating level of 3.0 tc 
Prerequisite: Tennis II, permission of the instr 
tor, or ability* to play at a level of 3.0. Enrollme 
limited to 16 per section. 1 credit 
Christine Shelton 
Offered Spring 2003 

975 Yoga 

Yoga I 

B.K.S. Iyengar yoga postures, breathing, and p 
losophy. Designed to give students an opportu 
to explore movement and breathing patterns i 
effort to strengthen the mind/body connection 
Enrollment limited to 20 per section. 1 credit 
Deborah Neubauer, Lisa Thompson 
Offered both semesters 

Yoga II 

The yoga of B. K. S. Iyengar — continuing level 

Refinement of postures and breathing techniq 

taught in Yoga I. Introduction of new postures 

along with continued discussions of yoga philt 

phy. Prerequisite: Yoga I. Enrollment limited ti 

1 credit 

Elizabeth Thompson 

Offered Spring 2003 



Performance Courses- 
Noncredit 



XIO Aerobics 

Fall four classes 

Spring four classes 

X20 Yoga 

Fall four classes 

Spring four classes 



rcise and Sport Studies 



211 



Ing 

iddition to riding classes for credit, noncredit 
ng instruction and participation in competitive 
ng are available at Smith College. A fee is 
rged for these courses, payable at Registration 
h semester. Further information may be ob- 
ed from Suzanne Payne, Director of Riding/ 
m Coach, extension 2734. 

le Minor in Exercise and 
>ort Studies 

risers: Barbara Brehm-Curtis, James H. 
nson. 

minor is designed to provide students with a 
iprehensive introduction to exercise and sport 
lies. This course of study would be useful for 
lents with an interest in exercise and sport and 
those considering graduate study and/or a 
eer in exercise science; community, worksite, 
)ther fitness programs; and the health sciences 
h as physical therapy and medicine. 

[uirements: six courses including 100 and ei- 
r 210 or 215. The other courses (16 credits) 
f be selected from ESS departmental offerings, 
iddition, one appropriate course from another 
•artment may be substituted with the adviser's 
mission. Only 4 performance course credits 
I be counted toward the minor. Course selec- 
i for the minor must be approved by a faculty 
iser. 

raduate Courses 

/iser: Donald Siegel. 

! Seminar in Philosophy and Ethics of Coaching 
Jcted topics in the philosophy of sport as they 
He to coaching. Drawing on readings from con- 
iporary sources, the course will examine be- 
s about the value of competitive sport in higher 
ication and the implication for coaches, 
redits 
ristine Shelton 



504 Current Issues in Coaching 

This seminar is designed to explore current social, 
political, educational, and economic issues which 
confront coaches and their players. Issues will be 
introduced through readings and presentations by 
coaches from area schools. Undergraduate stu- 
dents admitted with permission of the instructor. 
2 credits 

Christine Shelton 
Offered Spring 2003 

505d Theoretical and Practical Foundations 
of Coaching 

Assisting in the coaching of an intercollegiate 
team. Weekly conferences on team management, 
coach responsibilities, and coaching aids. 
4 credits 

Christine Shelton, Tim Bacon, Jane M. Stangl 
Full year course; Offered each year 

506d Advanced Practicum in Coaching 

Independent coaching and the study of advanced 
coaching tactics and strategy in a specific sport. 
Prerequisite: 505d. 4 credits 
Christine Shelton, Tim Bacon, Jane M. Stangl 
Full year course; Offered each year 

507 Colloquium in Critical Thinking and 
Research in Coaching 

A colloquium on current research in coaching. 
Graduate students, ESS faculty and the coaching 
staff of the Athletic Department will meet to dis- 
cuss and share work in progress as well as analyze 
coaching experiences and problems. May be re- 
peated for credit. 1 credit 
Carta Coffey, Christine Shelton, Fall 
Barbara Brehm-Curtis, Spring 
Offered both semesters each year 

510 Biomechanics of Sport 

Emphasis on the concepts of biomechanics and 
applications in specific sports. Prerequisite: 210a, 
undergraduate kinesiology, or biomechanics. {N} 
4 credits 
Jamesjohnson 

515 Exercise Physiology 

An advanced course in exercise physiology ori- 
ented toward the acute and chronic body reac- 
tions to exercise and sport. Laboratory sessions 



212 



Exercise and Sport Studi 



involve group projects in metabolism, pulmonary 
function, body composition, and evaluation of 
physical work capacity. Prerequisite: 215a or un- 
dergraduate exercise physiology. {N} 4 credits 
Jamesjohnson 
Offered Spring 2003 

530 Research and Statistical Methods for 
Exercise and Sport Studies 

Quantitative and qualitative evaluation in exercise 
and sport studies, including statistical methods 
and critical research analysis. {M} 4 credits 
Barbara Brehm-Curtis 
Offered Fall 2002 

540 Microcomputers in Exercise and Sport 
Studies 

Examination of computer utilization in the organi- 
zation and administration of physical activity pro- 
grams. Major course components include: (a) 
wordprocessing, (b) graphics and animation, (c) 
spreadsheets, (d) databases, (e) biomechanical 
analysis, (0 nutritional and health analysis, and 
(g) computer assisted learning, (h) Internet re- 
sources. {M} 4 credits 
Donald Siegel 

550 Women In Sport 

A course documenting the role of women in sport 
as parallel and complementary to women's place 
in society. Contemporary trends will be linked to 
historical and sociological antecedents. Focus is 
on historical, contemporary, and future perspec- 
tives and issues in women's sport. Offered in alter- 
nate years. Admission of undergraduates by per- 
mission of the instructor. {S} 4 credits 
Christine Shelton 



570 Seminar in Sport Psychology 

An examination of sport from a psychological pe 
spective. Topics include group processes, imagei 
leadership, motivation, perceived exertion, per- 
sonality, self-efficacy, social facilitation, and the 
effect of stress on performance. Students are re- 
quired to do independent research. {S} 4 credit! 
Donald Siegel 

575 Sports Medicine: Concepts in Care and 
Prevention of Athletic Injury 

Theory and practice of sports medicine with em- 
phasis on injury prevention, protection, and reh; 
bilitation. Prerequisite: 210 or the equivalent. En 
rollment is limited. {N} 2 credits 
Esther Haskvitz 
Offered Spring 2003 

580 Special Studies 

Adapted physical education, administration, cur- 
rent problems, exercise physiology, kinesiology, 
motor learning, or other approved topics. Hours 
scheduled individually. 1 to 4 credits 
Members of the Department 
Offered both semesters 

590 Thesis 

4 credits 

Offered both semesters 

590d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course 



565 Seminar in Skill Acquisition and 
Performance 

Survey of topics relevant to skill acquisition and 
performance, including detailed analysis of per- 
ceptual, decision-making, and effector processes. 
Independent research required. {N} 4 credits 
Esther Haskvitz, Christine Shelton, Lynn 
Oberbillig 
Offered Fall 2002 



213 



Film Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



iistant Professor 

candra Keller, Ph.D. 

risers 

lert Davis, Director, Educational Technology 

Services 

Dean Flower, Professor of English Language 

and Literature 



* 2 Dawn Fulton, Assistant Professor of French 

Studies 
Jefferson Hunter, Professor of English Language 

and Literature 
* 2 Barbara Kellum, Professor of Art, Director 
*' Hans R. Vaget, Professor of German Studies and 

of Comparative Literature 



) Introduction to Film Studies 

)verview of cinemas historical development as 
irtistic and social force. Students will become 
iliar with the aesthetic elements of cinema 
ual style, sound, narration and formal struc- 
|, the terminology of film production, and film 
)ries relating to formalism, ideology, psycho- 
lysis and feminism. Films (both classic and 
temporary) will be discussed from aesthetic, 
orical and social perspectives, enabling stu- 
ts to approach films as informed and critical 
yers. Enrollment limited to 60. {A} 4 credits 
sandra Keller 
Bred Fall 2002 

L Genre/Period 

?en Comedy 

tures, with occasional discussion, on film com- 
is from a variety of places and times: American 
jwball comedies and British Ealing comedies; 
les of the sexes; the silent or non-verbal com- 
of Chaplin, Keaton, and Jacques Tati; parodies 
•ther film genres; fast-talking comedy by the 
rx Brothers, Monty Python, Woody Allen, and 
vard Hawks; midsummer night's dreams by 
mar Bergman, Max Reinhardt and William 
terle, and others. Readings in film criticism, 
i history, and the theory of comedy Prerequi- 
: a college course in film or literature, or per- 
sion of the instructor. {L/A} 4 credits 



Jefferson Hunter 
Offered Fall 2002 

American Film and Culture from the Depression 
to the Sixties 

This course examines forty years in the life of both 
the United States and the cinema Americans 
watched during that time. It covers the period 
from the Great Depression to the sixties which 
coincides closely with the birth and dismantling 
dates of the Classical Hollywood Studio system, 
also knows as the Golden Age of Hollywood. We 
will concern ourselves not only with the impact of 
social and historical events (e.g. the Depression, 
WWII, McCarthyism, Civil Rights, Vietnam) on U.S. 
cinema, but with cinema's effect on culture as 
well. Related issues include: the importance of the 
star and genre systems, the changing nature of the 
filmgoing experience, the relationship between 
social movements and ideas and entertainment. 
Papers and weekly screenings required. {A} 
4 credits 

Alexandra Keller 
Offered Fall 2002 

Global Cinema after World War II 
This course examines national film movements 
after the Second World war. The post-war period 
was a time of increasing globalization, which 
brought about a more interconnected and interna- 
tional film culture. But it was also a time during 



214 



Film Stud 



which certain key national cinemas defined, or 
redefined themselves. "Global Cinema after World 
War II" will investigate both of these trends, as 
well as focus on the work and influence of signifi- 
cant directors and landmark films, emphasizing 
not only cultural specificity, but also crosscultural 
and transhistorical concerns. Papers and weekly 
screenings required. Topic pending approval by 
the Committee on Academic Priorities. {A} 
Alexandra Keller 
Offered Spring 2003 

280 Introduction to Video Production 

4 credits 

Topic I: Video I is an introductory video produc- 
tion course. This class will introduce you to the 
history and contemporary practice of video art/ 
documentary video and will provide you with the 
technical and conceptual skills to complete cre- 
ative video projects in small groups and individu- 
ally. Over the course of the semester, students will 
gain experience in pre-production, production 
and post-production techniques. Projects are de- 
signed to develop basic technical proficiency in 
the video medium as well as practical skills for the 
completion of the creative project. Prerequisite: 
200 (which may be taken concurrently) . Enroll- 
ment limited to 13. {A} 
Elizabeth L. Miller 
Offered Fall 2002 

Topic II: This course offers an introductory explo- 
ration into the moving image as an art form out- 
side of the conventions of the film and television 
industries. This class will cover technical and aes- 
thetic aspects of media art production and will 
also offer a theoretical and historical context in 
which to think about independent cinema and 
video art. Prerequisite: 200 (which may be taken 
concurrently). Enrollment limited to 13. {A} 
Ann Steuernagel 
Offered Spring 2003 



of narrative film technique. Each student will pn 
duce a short individual work. Prerequisite: 200. 
Enrollment limited to 13. {A} 4 credits 
Justin P. West 
Offered Fall 2002 

282 Advanced Video Seminar 

This course is designed to explore video as a en 
ative medium of cinematic expression. Students 
with a solid understanding of basic video produ 
tion will have an opportunity to work intensively 
with video in a seminar environment to explore 
advanced aspects of the medium. The course wi 
make use of critique and the viewing and discus 
sion of film and video works to give students an 
expanded understanding of the technical deman 
and creative potential of the medium. Students i 
the course will work on an individual productio 
over the course of the semester as well as panic 
pating in shorter group problem-solving project 
Some alternative media may be explored. Prere< 
uisite: FLS 281 or equivalent. Enrollment limitec 
13. {A} 4 credits 
Justin P. West 
Offered Spring 2003 

351 Film Theory 

This seminar explores main currents in film 
theory, including formalist, realist, structuralist, 
psychoanalytic, feminist, poststructuralist, 
cognitivist, and cultural-contextualist approache 
to questions regarding the nature, function, and 
possibilities of cinema. The course is designed 2 
an advanced introduction and assumes no prior 
exposure to film theory. Fulfills film theory re- 
quirement for the minor. Prerequisite: 200 or th 
equivalent. {A} 4 credits 
Alexandra Keller 
Offered Spring 2003 

400 Special Studies 

1-4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 



281 Video Production Workshop: Narrative 

This course provides students with basic produc- 
tion skills (camera, fighting, sound, story struc- 
ture, editing) with an emphasis on narrative. 
Course work includes both group and individual 
production projects in the context of a close study 



Crosslisted Courses 

ENG 120 Colloquia in Literature 
Shakespeare and Film 

A study of the way filmmakers edit, distort, claril 



Im Studies 



215 



id otherwise interpret Shakespeare's plays; the 
•ocess of metamorphosing theatre into film, im- 
ply into image. Works to be studied include 
mry V, Richard III, Romeo and Juliet, King 
•an Twelfth Night, The Winter's Tale. {L} Wl 
credits 

iferson Hunter 
fered Fall 2002 

tN 244 French Cinema 

pic: Africa and Europe on Screen 
ids course will focus on the representations of 
ice and gender in films from francophone coun- 
ts in Europe and West Africa. We will consider 
nceptions of cultural difference seen from 
thin and outside of France, and the ways in 
,dch these images are filtered through portrayals 
masculinity and femininity. Works by directors 
ch as Sembene Ousmane, Claire Denis, Mweze 
angura, Bassek Ba Kobhio. Offered in French, 
requisite: FRN 220, 230, or permission of the 
| tractor. 

!:eenings: Tuesdays 7:30 pm. {L/A/F} 4 credits 
. wn Fulton 
t fered Fall 2002 

R 230 Topics in German Cinema 
pfc. Weimar Cinema (1919-1933) 

i tudy of representative German films from 
( rmany's "Golden Age" with emphasis on investi- 
i ing historical and sociological background; 
i uence of Expressionist theater; advent of 
I ind; changing role of women; genesis of horror, 
$ ion, and Utopian film; influence on New Ger- 
t n Gnema and contemporary popular culture, 
^ns by Lang, Murnau, Pabst, Sternberg, Wegener, 
i 1 Wiene. Knowledge of film and of German is 
t required, although background in either 
tuld be useful. (E) {L/H/A} 4 credits 
InsR. Vaget 
( ered Spring 2003 

IE 317 Movements in Design 

1 >ics in Lighting Design. Permission of the in- 
sictor required. {L/H/A} 4 credits 
H offered in 2002-03 

* T 314 Gender and Film 

I s course examines the operation of gender in 
j>;>ular film representations It will examine se- 



lected popular Hollywood films, films by women 
directors and documentary filmmakers in the con- 
text of some of the questions raised by recent 
feminist film theory: Is the gaze male? Is the gaze 
white? Is there a female spectatorship? How do 
women exercise agency and desire within the 
structure of filmmaking and viewing? Where are 
the women in the history of filmmaking? During 
the first half of the course, we will read a range of 
contemporary film theorists and view the classic 
Hollywood films that have been at the center of 
some of these debates. During the latter half of the 
course, we will study principally documentary and 
feature films by women directors and consider 
how their film practice engages, and perhaps di- 
rectly responds to, the questions the theory has 
raised. Among the directors whose work we might 
examine are: Julie Dash, Jane Campion, Mira Nair, 
Deepa Mehta, Marleen Gorris, Gillian Armstrong. 
Selections will be made in consultation with the 
seminar. Prerequisites: WST 150 or 250 and one 
other Women's Studies course or permission of 
the instructor. Additionally, all students must sign 
up outside the Women's Studies Program office 
(Seelye 207b). {H/A} (E) 4 credits 
Wendy Kolmar 
Offered Fall 2002 

The Minor 

Adviser: To be announced. 

The Film Studies Program offers the opportunity 
for in-depth study of the history, theory 7 , and criti- 
cism of film and other forms of the moving image. 
The Program's primary goal is to expose students 
to a wide range of cinematic works, styles and 
movements in order to cultivate critical under- 
standing of the medium's significance as an art 
form, as a means of cultural and political expres- 
sion, and as a reflection of social ideologies and 
mentalities. 

Requirements: six semester courses to be taken at 
Smith or, by permission of the director, elsewhere 
among the Five College institutions. 

Required courses: 

FLS 200 Introduction to Film Studies 

FLS351 Film Theory 



216 FilmSti 

Electives: 

MS 350 Seminar: Race and Representation: 

Afro-Americans in Film 
ARH280 Film and Art History 
ENG 120 Colloquia in Literature: 

Shakespeare and Film 
FLS 241 Genre/Period 
FLS 245 British Film and Television 
FLS 280 Video Production Workshop 
FLS 28 1 Video Production Workshop 
FLS 282 Advanced Video Production Workshop 
FLS 350 Questions of Cinema 
FRN244 French Cinema 
GER230 German Cinema 
ITL 342 Italian Cinema 
SPN 246 Topics in Latin American Literature: 

Topic: Latin American Film as 

Visual Narrative 
SPN 246 Topic: The Bronze Screen: Performing 

Latina/on Film and in Literature 
THE 3 1 7 Movements in Design 



217 






First-Year Seminars 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



(S 112 The Work of Repair 

iman beings appear to spend a great deal of 
ne on projects of repair — fixing objects, mend- 
g relationships, repairing the social and political 
.mage left in the wake of past events. What do 
ch projects require of the mender? What 
anges take place in the mended? When is repair 
sirable? When is it inappropriate or impossible? 
.long the topics for examination: the restoration 
works of art; repair of the environment; the 
action of criticism and revision; the place of 
>al reparations; the meaning of apology and 
conciliation; pleasure in Ruins. Enrollment lim- 
d to 16 first year students. {S} Wl 4 credits 
'zabeth V. Spelman (Philosophy) 
fered Fall 2002 

S 118 Groves of Academe 

study of short stories, novels, memoirs, plays, 
<>ays, and films that describe and interpret the 
stsecondary academic experience of the twenti- 
>i century. By reading about the real and fictional 
'periences of others, students may come to un- 
•rstand their own. In addition to some serious 
I alytical essays, students will make presentations 
one and with others) on the works and the 
iues under consideration. Enrollment limited 
1 16 first-year students. {L} Wl 4 credits 
itricia Skarda (English) 
fered Fall 2002 

IS 119 Performance and Film Criticism 

; introduction to the elements, history, and func- 
Ins of criticism. How do reviewers form their 
< tical responses to theatre and dance perfor- 
imces as well as to films? The seminar will ex- 
|>re different critical perspectives, such as psy- 
oanalytic, feminist, political, and intercultural 
^roaches. The students will attend live perfor- 
i Jices and film and \ideo screenings, and will 
ute their own reviews and critical responses. 



Seminar discussions and student presentations will 
be complemented by visits and conversations with 
invited critics and artists. Enrollment limited to 16 
first-year students. {L/A} Wl 4 credits 
Kiki Gounaridou (Theatre) 
Offered Fall 2002 

FYS 121 The Evolution and Transformation 
of the Northampton State Hospital 

This seminar explores the rise and demise of the 
Northampton State Hospital, its impact on the city 
of Northampton's character and development, and 
the current planning process around the redevel- 
opment of the site. 

The Northampton State Hospital grounds lie 
adjacent to Smith College. The facility was opened 
in the mid- 1800s as the third hospital for the in- 
sane in Massachusetts. At its height, a century- 
later, it had over 2000 patients and over 500 em- 
ployees. In 1978, a federal district court consent 
decree ordered the increased use of community- 
based treatment as one part of a process of 
deinstitutionalizing the mentally ill in Western 
Massachusetts. In 1993 the hospital was officially 
closed. Now, 154 acres of land and 45 buildings 
on the "campus' 1 have been made available by the 
state for reuse and future development. As a case 
study of socio-economic change and public policy, 
this seminar will explore the history of the 
Northampton State Hospital, deinstitutionalization, 
and the hospital's closing, and the prospects for 
the site. Students will develop background and 
skills, including map reading, site visits, and his- 
torical research, to appreciate both the past and 
the future of the hospital grounds. Enrollment 
limited to 16 first year students. {H/S} Wl 
4 credits 

Thomas Riddell (Economics and member of the 
Advisory Committee of the Program in American 
Studies) 
Offered Fall 2002 



218 



First-Year Semir 



FYS 130 Lions: Science and Science Fiction 

This seminar will explore lions from many per- 
spectives. We will look at how lions are viewed by 
scientists, science fiction writers, directors of 
documentary films, and movie producers. We will 
also compare different kinds of science fiction and 
different kinds of mammals. Readings will be by 
OS Card, CJ Cherryh, G Schallar, and others. En- 
rollment limited to 16 first year students. {N} Wl, 
Quantitative Skills 4 credits 
Virginia Hayssen (Biological Sciences) 
Offered Fall 2002 

FYS 131 Environmental Issues on Campus 

This course will evaluate the environmental impact 
of land use activity on the water quality and hy- 
drology of the Mill River, which forms the Smith 
College campus pond. Class time will be spent 
making stream measurements and observations 
and performing laboratory analyses on water 
samples collected in the field. We also will use 
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to evaluate 
land use cover types and interpret water quality 
data. Enrollment limited to 14 first year students. 
{N} Wl, Quantitative Skills 4 credits 
Amy Rhodes (Geology) 
Offered Fall 2002 

FYS 133 What Can We Know? 

An exploration of the development of physical 
ideas from the deterministic nature of Newtonian 
physics to the random nature of modern quantum 
theory from a scientific and philosophical point of 
view Topics include the necessity of using chance 
and probability to achieve answers to questions in 
chemical, atomic, and nuclear systems, and the 
requirements that chance and probability play in 
quantum theory. We also examine in some detail 
quantum mechanical paradoxes. The course is 
designed to give first year students a general un- 
derstanding of the mysteries of modern scientific 
thought. Enrollment limited to 20 first year stu- 
dents. {N} Wl, Quantitative Skills 4 credits 
Robert Linck (Chemistry) , Piotr Decowski 
(Physics) 
Offered Fall 2002 

FYS 135 The Explorers 

What does it feel like to go into the unknown? 
What do Burton, who searched for the source of 



the Nile, and Shackleton, who attempted to cro: 
Antartica, have in common? How did they plan 
their trips, find their way? What dangers did the 
encounter? Why did some fail, die? In this semii 
we will survey five major explorations. Students 
will work with historical documents, study navi 
tion (including celestial), and work with varioi 
computer applications to develop presentations 
the explorers. Quantitative Skills 4 credits 
James Johnson (Exercise and Sport Studies) 
Offered Fall 2002 

FYS 137: Of Minds and Molecules 

What is the relationship between our sense per- 
ceptions of objects and their chemical and bio- 
chemical properties? What are the models that 
chemists use to describe atomic structures, anc 
what are the implications, and "metaphors," as 
ciated with these models? For example, in what 
ways are molecular "switches," "traps" or 
"brakes" like the real switches, traps and brak( 
What are the advantages and disadvantages of u 
ing visual metaphors to understand our other 
senses, such as taste and smell? For instance, d 
it make sense to ask about the "shape" and "si: 
of a smell or a taste? What color is a fragrance? 
Similarly, do the metaphors that chemists use to 
describe a molecule affect how they perceive it: 
For that matter, is chemistry really a separate sc 
ence at all, or is it reducible to just a part of ph 
ics? We will use examples drawn primarily fron 
chemistry and biochemistry in exploring questi 
about science from a philosophical perspective 
The course is designed for first-year students w 
would like to explore some of the current cone 
tual issues that create controversy about scienc 
Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. 
{N/M} Wl 4 credits 

Nalini Bhushan (Philosophy); David Bickar 
(Chemistry) 

FYS 138 Social Phobia and Fear of Public 
Speaking 

This course reviews the burgeoning empirical 
literature examining social phobia and fear of 
public speaking. We cover what is known scieri 
cally about a fear of speaking in front of others 
often relying on information derived from sam! 
of individuals with clinical degrees of social an 
ety. We augment our readings with quantitative I 



*st- Year Seminars 



219 



signments that illustrate analytical tools used by 
nical psychologists. In addition, we use class 
embers' oral presentations as opportunities to 
ply the knowledge we gain regarding the phe- 
imenology and reduction of public speaking 
xiety. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year stu- 
nts. {S/M} Quantitative Skills 4 credits 
>tric ia DiBartolo (Psychology) 
fered Fall 2002 

r S 142 Reenacting the Past: History of 
rpothesis 

this fall semester seminar students reenact mo- 
unts of high drama from the distant and not-so- 
>tant past, and from cultures both strange and 
niliar. The class consists of three competitive 
mes: Athens after the Peloponnesian War (399- 
i3 B.C.); a succession crisis in the Ming Dynasty 
hina in the 16th century); and the trial of Anne 
itchinson (Colonial Massachusetts) . Course 
iterials include game rules, historical readings, 
tailed role assignments, and classic texts, such 
Plato's Republic for the Athens game, the 
elects of Confucius for the China game, Calvin's 
stitutes for the Hutchinson game. Class sessions 
i run by students; the instructor sets up the 
mes and functions as an adviser. In each of the 
'ee games, students take on roles, ranging from 
dinary people to prominent figures like Em- 
ror Wan-li; they work in groups, debate issues, 
gotiate agreements (in and out of class) , cast 
res, and strive to achieve their group's objec- 
ts. Papers are all game- and role-specific. En- 
illment is limited to 16 first-year students per 
i:tion. Either or both of the seminars (FYS 142 
FYS 144) may be taken. {H} Wl 4 credits 
:tion 1 : Richard Millington (English) 
!:tion 2: Daniel Gardner (History) 
fered Fall 2002 



FYS 144 Reenacting the Past: History of 
Hypothesis 

In this spring semester seminar students reenact 
moments of high drama from the distant and not- 
so-distant past, and from cultures both strange 
and familiar. The class consists of three competi- 
tive games: the French Revolution (1791); Freud, 
Jung, and the Rise of the Unconscious (Vienna at 
the turn of the century); and Indian Independence 
(1945). Course materials include game rules, 
historical readings, detailed role assignments, and 
classic texts, such as Rousseau's Social Contract 
for the French Revolution game. Class sessions are 
run by students; the instructor sets up the games 
and functions as an adviser. Students work in 
groups, debate issues, negotiate agreements (in 
and out of class), cast votes, and strive to achieve 
their group's objectives. Some students take on 
individual roles, such as Lafayette or Mahatma 
Gandhi. Papers are all game- and role-specific. 
Enrollment is limited to 16 first-year students per 
section. {H} Wl 4 credits 
Section 1: David Cohen (Mathematics) 
Section 2: Peter de Villiers (Psychology) 
Offered Spring 2003 



? 



220 



Foreign Language Literature 
Courses in Translation 



Visiting faculty ; 




The courses listed below are fully described in the 
originating department or program, shown by the 
initial three-letter designation. (See pages 64-66 
for the key to department/program designations.) 

For other courses that include literature in transla- 
tion, see the listings in Comparative Literature and 
Film Studies. 



EAL 243 Japanese Poetry in Cultural Context 
EAL 244 Construction of Gender in Modern 

Japanese Women's Writing 
EAL 245 Writing the "Other" in Modern Japan< 

Literature 
EAL 26 1 Major Themes in Literature: 

East- West Perspectives 
EAL 360 Seminar: Topics on East Asian 

Languages and Literatures 



CLS 190 


The Trojan War 






CLS 227 


Classical Mythology 






CLS 230 


The Historical Imagination 


GER151 


Colloquium: Germans and Jews 


CLS 232 


Paganism in the Greco-Roman World 


GER 227 


Topics in German Studies 


CLS 233 


Gender and Sexuality in Greco-Roman 


GER 230 Topics in German Cinema 




Culture 


GER/MUS271 Richard Wagner: Pro and Contra 


CLS 234 


Rites of Passage 


GER 288 


Narratives of the Nation, 1806-1990 


CLS 236 


Cleopatra: Histories, Fictions, Fantasies 










RUS 126 


Readings in 19th-century Russian 


EAL 100 


The Literary Traditions of East Asia: 




Literature 




China, Japan, and Korea 


RUS 127 


Readings in 20th-century Russian 


EAL 231 


The Culture of the Lyric in Traditional 




Literature 




China 


RUS 235 


Tolstoy 


EAL 232 


Modern Chinese Literature 


RUS 235 


Dostoevsky 


EAL 233 


The Chinese Literary' Tradition 


RUS 236 


Russian Drama 


EAL 235 


How Poems Mean in China and the West 


RUS 237 


The Heroine in Russian Literature fro 


EAL 236 


Modernity: East and West 




The Primary Chronicle to Turgenev's 


EAL 240 


Japanese Language and Culture 




On the Eve 


EAL 241 


Traditional Japanese Literature 


RUS 239 


Major Russian Writers 


EAL 242 


Modern Japanese Literature 







221 



French Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



rofessors 

11 Mar\' Ellen Birkett, Ph.D. 
in Leone, Ph.D. 
janie Vanpee, Ph.D., Chair 
Eglal Doss-Quinby, Ph.D. 
Martine Gantrel, Agregee de l'Universite, 
f Docteur en Litterature Frangaise 
enise Rochat, Ph.D. 



Instructor 

Nicolas Russell, M.A. 

Lecturers 

Nicole Ball, C.A.P.E.S. de Lettres Modernes 
Christiane Metral, Lie. es. L. 
Catherine Marchiset Bloom, M.A. 
Candace Skorupa Walton, Ph.D. 



distant Professors 
nathan Gosnell, Ph.D. 
>lene Visentin, M.A., D.E.A, Docteur de 
L'Universite 
Dawn Fulton, Ph.D. 



Visiting Lecturer from the Ecole Normale 
Superieure in Paris 

Christophe Camard, Agrege de l'Universite 

Assistants in French 

Melusine Bonneau (Fall) 
Vanessa Gelican (Spring) 



I classes and examinations in the department are 
nducted in French with the exception of cross- 
ted courses unless indicated. In all language 
urses, slide lectures, films, and work in the Cen- 
* for Foreign Languages and Cultures will 
pplement classroom instruction. 
Students who receive scores of 4 and 5 on the 
vanced Placement tests in French Language and 
[ 'erature may not apply that credit toward the 
' gree if they complete any course in the se- 
ence prior to 230. 

Qualified students may apply for residence in 
Maison Francaise, Dawes House. 



stories. Students completing the course normally 
go on to French 220 or 230. Students may become 
eligible for study in Paris or Geneva during their 
junior year by taking 3 courses at the 220 level or 
above in their sophomore year. Class meetings: 
four days a week and daily work in the Center for 
Foreign Languages and Cultures (CFLAC) . Enroll- 
ment limited to 20 per section. {F} 10 credits 
Ann Leone, Nicolas Russell, Candace Skorupa 
Walton, Fall 2002 

Denise Rochat, Eglal Doss-Quinby, Candace 
Skorupa Walton, Spring 2003 
Full year course; Offered each year 



anguage 

edit is normally not granted for the first semes- 
only of French 10 Id. 

•Id Accelerated Beginning French 

- me year accelerated introduction to French 
Ued on the video method "French in Action," 
• i materials such as articles, poems, and short 



120 Intermediate French 

Review of basic grammar and emphasis on oral 
expression through role plays and discussions. 
Materials include a film, video clips, poems, ar- 
ticles. Prerequisite: two or three years of high 
school French. Students completing the course 
normally go on to French 220. Enrollment limited 
to 20 per section. Four class hours per week plus 
laboratory. {F} 4 credits 



222 



French Stud 



Christiane Metral, Nicole Ball, Candace Skorupa 
Walton, Fall 2002 
Offered Fall each year 

220 High Intermediate French 

Comprehensive review of language skills through 
weekly practice in writing and class discussion. 
Texts may include a movie or video, a comic book, 
a play, and a novel. Prerequisite: three or four 
years of high school French, lOld or permission 
of the department. Students completing the course 
normally go on to French 230 or above. {F} 
4 credits 

Christophe Camard, Jonathan Gosnell, Dawn 
Fulton, Candace Skorupa Walton, Fall 2002 
Offered Fall each year 

220 High Intermediate French 

A continuation of 120. Review of language skills 
through weekly practice in writing and class dis- 
cussion. Texts may include a movie or video, a 
comic book, a play, and a novel. Prerequisite: 120, 
or permission of the department. Students com- 
pleting the course normally go on to French 230 
or above. {F} 4 credits 
Martine Gantrel, Nicole Ball, Christophe 
Camard, Spring 2003 
Offered Spring each year 

221 Conversation Section 

Discussion of contemporary French issues, with 
emphasis on conversational strategies and speech 
acts of everyday life. Activities will include role 
playing and group work. Use of authentic materi- 
als such as songs, newspaper articles, films, cul- 
tural objects, audio segments and Francophone 
websites. Optional 1 credit course open only to 
students concurrently enrolled in FRN 220, High 
Intermediate French. Enrollment limited to 15. 
Graded S/U only. {F} 1 credit 
Melusine Bonneau, Fall 2002 
Vanessa Gelican, Spring 2003 
Offered Fall and Spring each year 

255j Speaking (Like The) French: Convers- 
ing, Discussing, Debating, Arguing 

A total immersion course in French oral expres- 
sion. Using authentic cultural materials — French 



films and television programs such as round tab 
discussions, formal interviews, intellectual ex- 
changes and documentary reporting — students 
will analyze and learn how the French converse, 
argue, persuade, disagree and agree with one ai 
other. Intensive practice of interactive multimed 
exercises, role-playing, debating, presenting for- 
mal exposes, and correcting and improving pro 
nunciation. Prerequisite: one course above FRN 
220 or permission of the instructor. Admission 1 
interview with instructor during advising week. 
Normally, this course does not count as prepara 
tion for Smith Junior Year Abroad programs in 
Paris and Geneva. Enrollment limited to 14. {F} 
4 credits 

Christiane Metral 
Offered Interterm 2003 

300 Advanced Grammar and Composition. 

Emphasis on some of the more difficult points o 
grammar. Weekly compositions; some work in 
phonetics. Discussions and reports based on sh 
texts and films. Prerequisite: normally, one cour 
in French at the 250 level or permission of the 
instructor. {F} 4 credits 
Nicolas Russell, Fall 2002 
Offered Fail each year 

385 Advanced Studies in Language 

Topic: Global French: The Language ofBusine 
and International Trade 
An overview of commercial and financial termin 
ogy against the backdrop of contemporary Fren 
business culture, using case studies, French tele 
sion and newspapers, and the WWW. Emphasis 
the acquisition of essential technical vocabulary 
the development of skills in reading and writing 
business documents, and oral communication i 
business setting. Prepares students for the 
Certiflcat pratique defrangais commercial e, 
economique granted by the Paris Chamber of 
Commerce and Industry. Prerequisite: a 300-le> 
course and a solid foundation in grammar and 
excellent command of everyday vocabulary; or 
permission of the instructor. {F} 4 credits. 
Helene Visentin 
Offered Spring 2003 



ich Studies 



223 



termediate Literature and 
ilture 

) Readings in Modern Literature 

ntroduction to literature, designed to develop 
Is in oral expression and expository writing, 
ansition from language courses to more ad- 
ced courses in literature and culture. A student 
' take only one section of 230. Prerequisite: 
I or permission of the instructor. {L/F} 
■edits 

;red each Fail and Spring 
[ions as follows: 

fdhood and Self-Discovery 
examination of the representation of childhood 
its relationship to family, society, memory, 
itivity, and self-discovery. Readings from 19th 
20th century French and Francophone au- 
I such as Colette, Maupassant, Alain-Fournier, 
teau. Films by directors such as Truffaut, 
le, and others. {L/F} 4 credits 
istophe Camard 
;red Fall 2002 

am Places and Nightmare Spaces: French 
rary Landscapes 

ough texts by authors from Louis XIV to 
ate, we will discuss questions about literary 
s of landscape: Why do we flee or search for a 
Iscape? What makes us cherish or fear a par- 
lar place? What do landscapes tell us that the 
rator or characters cannot or will not tell? 
er authors may include Rousseau, Victor Hugo, 
teaubriand, Maupassant, Apollinaire, Robbe- 
let, and James Sacre. {L/F} 4 credits 
i Leone 
ered Fall 2002 

\tasy and Madness 

udy of madness and its role in the literary tra- 
on. Such authors as Maupassant, Flaubert, 
1am Warner- Vieyra, J.-P. Sartre, Marguerite- 
ras. The imagination, its powers and limits in 
individual and society. {L/F} 4 credits 
istophe Camard 
ered Spring 2003 



Quest for Identity 

Who am I? Is the self united or divided? What is its 
relation to others? These questions, addressed by a 
number of twentieth-century writers, will be the 
central focus in a course which aims to introduce 
the fundamental concepts of literary criticism. 
Reading of poems, plays, stories and novels by 
Beckett, Duras, Annie Ernaux, and Patrick 
Modiano. {L/F} 4 credits 
Nicole Ball 
Offered Fall 2002 

Women Writers of Africa and the Caribbean 
An introduction to works by contemporary women 
writers from francophone Africa and the Carib- 
bean. Topics to be studied include colonialism, 
exile, motherhood, and intersections between 
class and gender. Our study of these works and of 
the French language will be informed by attention 
to the historical, political, and cultural circum- 
stances of writing as a woman in a former French 
colony. Texts will include works by Mariama Ba, 
Maryse Conde, Gisele Pineau, and Myriam Warner- 
Vieyra. {L/F} 4 credits 
Dawn Fulton 
Offered Spring 2003 

240 Qa parle drolement: French Theatre 
Workshop 

The study and performance of contemporary 
francophone texts (1945-2003), including theat- 
rical texts as wells as poems, songs, scenes from 
films, and other forms of discourse. By embodying 
a variety of roles and entering into dialogue with 
an array of characters, students will experiment 
with different ways of speaking and using language 
and become familiar with the many facets of con- 
temporary French culture. Our work will culmi- 
nate with a performance of scenes that will 
present a colorful collage of contemporary French 
culture. In French. Space reserved for 5-College 
enrollments. Prerequisite: intermediate French or 
above. 2 credits 
Fabienne Bullot 
Offered Spring 2003 

244 French Cinema 

Topic: Africa and Europe on Screen. 

This course will focus on the representations of 



224 



French Stud 



race and gender in films from francophone coun- 
tries in Europe and West Africa. We will consider 
conceptions of cultural difference seen from 
within and outside of France, and the ways in 
which these images are filtered through portrayals 
of masculinity and femininity. Works by directors 
such as Sembene Ousmane, Claire Denis, Mweze 
Ngangura, Bassek Ba Kobhio. Offered in French. 
Prerequisite: FRN 220, 230, or permission of the 
instructor. Screenings: Tuesdays 7:30 pm. 
{L/A/F} 4 credits 
Dawn Fulton 
Offered Fall 2002 

251 The French Press on Line 

A study of contemporary' France through daily 
readings of French magazines and newspapers on 
line. Prerequisite: a course above 220 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. {S/F} 4 credits 
Jonathan Gosnell Christophe Camard, 
Spring 2003 
Offered Spring each year 

253 Medieval and Renaissance France 

Where did Western culture come from? We will 
uncover the power the past has over the present by 
exploring themes of heroism, love and learning 
during the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Reading 
of representative literary texts and documents, 
supplemented by illustrated talks and films. Basis 
for the major. Prerequisite: a course above 220 or 
permission of the instructor. {L/S/F} 4 credits 
Mary Ellen Birkett, Fall 2002 
Nicolas Russell Spring 2003 
Offered both semesters each year 

254 France Before the Revolution 

Topic: Power and Resistance in theAncien 
Regime 

The 17th and 18th centuries gave rise to new so- 
cial dynamics in France. The "honnete homme," 
the "precieuse," the "courtisan," and the 
"philosophe" coexist with — and often contest — 
the established social order. We will examine the 
tension between these new social categories and 
official power, expressed through satire, literary 
and intellectual battles, and other literary genres. 
Basis for the major. Prerequisite: a course above 
220 or permission of the instructor. {L/S/F} 
4 credits 



Helene Visentin 
Offered Spring 2003 

256 From Revolution to Revolution: 
1789 to 1968 

An introduction to important transformations in 
19th and 20th century French society. We will e] 
amine various historic events and analyze their 
impact on political, social, and cultural develop 
ments. We will gain a sense of how these symbo 
moments have transformed French language an 
political thought, and how they are reflected in 
cultural forms such as literature, music, art, an< 
film. Prerequisite: a course above FRN 220 or 
permission of the instructor. {F/H/S} 4 credits 
Jonathan Gosnell 
Offered Fall 2002 

260 Literary Visions 

4 credits 

Love Triangles 

We will read famous nineteenth-and twentieth- 
century novels and see how a depiction of a bril 
liant and highly cultured society typically sinks i 
the day-to-day mechanics of an often-disappoim 
ing love triangle. Novels by Balzac, Flaubert, 
Proust, and Duras. First-year students with a 
strong background in French and an interest in 
literature most welcome. Pre-requisite: a course 
above FRN 220 or permission of the instructor. 
{L,F} 

Martine Gantrel 
Offered Fall 2002 

Novels into Films 

We will read famous French novels of the 19th i 
20th centuries, and compare them with their fil 
adaptations. Special attention will be given to fit 
ary and filmic analysis, questions of styles and ' 
genres, and the many issues that come with furr- 
ing novels into films. No previous knowledge of 
film theory required. Novels by Balzac, Proust a 
Duras. Films by directors such as Angelo, 
Schlbndorff, and Brook. Prerequisite: a course ! 
above FRN 220 or permission of the instructor. 
Film screenings: Thursdays 7:30 p.m. {L,A,F} 
Martine Gantrel 
Offered Spring 2003 



nch Studies 



225 



Ivanced Literature and 
jlture 

requisite: two courses in literature or culture at 
200 level or permission of the instructor. 

Topics in Medieval Renaissance and 
? rat u re 

be offered 2003-2004 

D Topics in Seventeenth/Eighteenth 
ntury Literature 

)ic: Women Writers and Images of Women in 
h and 18th Century French Literature 
n did women have access to knowledge in the 
ly modern period? Who were the women who 
ed to put pen to paper? How did feminist pro- 
s take form? We will examine the representa- 

1 of women in 17th and 18th century society 
3ugh different literary genres (novels, plays, 
ays) , and we will analyze texts by women au- 
rs. The relations between these representations 
I the social and historical context will be cen- 
to our study of this period. Texts by Madeleine 

Scudery, Moliere, Marie-Madeleine de La 
ette, Franchise de Graffigny, Isabelle de 
irriere et Denis Diderot. Some of these texts 
I be compared with their film adaptations. 
r F) 4 credits 
} ene Visentin 
ered Fall 2002 

Topics in Nineteenth/Twentieth Century 

erature 

be offered 2003-2004 

Genre Studies 

i Art and Craft of the Short Story. A study of a 
ti and eclectic genre practiced by some of the 

1 original French and Francophone writers, 
m the Middle Ages to today, with an emphasis 
19th and 20th century 7 authors. {L/F} 4 credits 
niseRochat 

fered Spring 2003 



380 Topics in French Cultural Studies 

'To Be or Not to Be (French)?': National Symbols 
in Contemporary France 
Parisian cultural hegemony and haute cuisine are 
almost universally recognized as two major sym- 
bols of France. This course will try to understand 
the historical, economical, and cultural factors 
behind these symbols. Particular attention will be 
given to the role of national symbols in the forma- 
tion of national identity. Articles from the press; 
essays by historians, economists, and sociologists; 
literary excerpts; films by Rossellini, Axel, Bunuel, 
Chabrol, and Rohmer. Prerequisite: one course 
above FRN 300. {S/F/L} 4 credits 
Martine Gantrel 
Offered Fall 2002 

America in the French National Conscience: 
From Tocqueville to PC 
Over the last two centuries, what hold has 
"America' ' had on the French imagination? What 
kinds of sentiment does America evoke in intellec- 
tual, artistic and political circles in France today? 
Through a careful reading of selected works, we 
will consider America seen through the French 
lens — as democratic model, as modernity per- 
sonified, as cultural menace. Our collaborative 
study will take us from virulent anti-Americanism 
to the "Americanization' ' of French society. We will 
examine contemporary French views articulated in 
the media and the arts. Particular attention will be 
paid to cross-cultural perceptions. {S/F} 
4 credits 

Jonathan Gosnell 
Offered Spring 2003 



Seminars 

Prerequisite: one course at the 300 level. 

391 Topics in Literature 

Topic: Women Writers of the Middle Ages 
What genres did women practice in the Middle 
Ages and in what way did they transform those 
genres for their own purposes? What access did 
women have to education and to the works of 
other writers, male and female? To what extent did 
women writers question the traditional gender 



220 



French Srudi 



roles of their society? How did they represent fe- 
male characters in their works and what do their 
statements about authorship reveal about their 
understanding of themselves as writing women? 
What do we make of anonymous works written in 
the feminine voice? Reading will include the love 
letters of Heloise, the lais and fables of Marie de 
France, the songs of the trobairitz and women 
trouveres, and the writings of Christine de Pizan. 
{L/F} 4 credits 
Eglal Doss-Quinby 
Offered Spring 2003 

392 Topics in Culture 

Topic: The Year 1830 

After more than three decades of conflict with 
prevailing traditions, a new generation of French 
men and women came into its own in an astonish- 
ingly rich twelve-month span. And they changed 
the face of France. By following the "headlines" 
throughout the year 1830, we will encounter the 
political revolution of "Les Trois Glorieuses," the 
triumph of Romantic esthetics, the creation of 
French colonialism in Algeria, growing awareness 
of the need for social action at home, and intensi- 
fied longings for escape into exoticism and fantasy. 
We will study authors such as Hugo, Stendhal, 
Musset, Balzac as well as representative works of 
artists, musicians, journalists, and historians. 
{L/F} 4 credits 
Mary Ellen Birkett 
Offered Fall 2002 

404 Special Studies 

Admission by permission of the department; nor- 
mally for junior and senior majors and for quali- 
fied juniors and seniors from other departments. 
4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 



Courses Cross-Listed with 
Other Departments and 
Programs 

CLT 274 The Garden: Paradise and Battlefie 

Ann Leone 

CLT 278 Madness in Women's Novels of 
Africa and the Caribbean 
Dawn Fulton 

CLT 285 Europe on the Move: Recent 
Narratives of Immigration 

AnnaBotta.Janie Vanpee 

CLT 300 Contemporary Literary Theory 

Janie Vanpee 

CLT 361 Composing Knowledge in the 
Renaissance 

Nicolas Russell 

Study Abroad in Paris or 
Geneva 

Advisers: 

Paris: Janie Vanpee 
Geneva: Jonathan Gosnell 

Majors in both French language and literature ar 
French studies who spend the year in Paris or 
Geneva will normally meet certain of the require 
ments during that year. 

Recommendations for study abroad: 

Normally, students going on Smith College Junioi- 
Year Abroad programs to Paris or Geneva shouk 
have completed a minimum of four semester-lor 
courses of college French, of which at least one 
should be taken in the spring semester precedin 
study abroad. Students beginning French with FI 
101 must take three more French courses in the 
sophomore year. Students should take one of th« 
following: 253. 254. 256. 260, or a course at a 
higher level. FRN 255j normally will not count 
as preparation for Smith College study abroad 
programs. 






tench Studies 

rhe Major 

dvisers: Mary Ellen Birkett, Eglal Doss-Quinby, 
awn Fulton, Martine Gantrel, Jonathan Gosnell, 
nn Leone, Denise Rochat, Nicolas Russell, Helene 
isentin. 

or the classes of 2002 and 2003, 
oth majors are in effect. 

FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

equipments: ten 4-credit courses, distributed as 

|>llows: 

1 The basis for the French language and litera- 
ture major: 253, 254, or an equivalent ac- 
cepted by the department; 
300, followed by 385; 

* Two 300-level courses, to be taken in the se- 
nior year; one of these two courses may be a 
seminar in French literature. 
Five additional 4-credit courses in French at 
the 230 level or above (of which three must be 
in literature) . 

Normally FRN 2 55 j will not count towards ful- 
filling the requirements of the major. 

ajors in French Literature must have a minimum 
six (6) 300-level courses in French, including 
)0 and 385. 

udents majoring in French literature must take at 
ast two (2) courses in periods before the nine- 
,enth century. FRN 253 and above may count 
ward the period requirement. French literature 
ajors are encouraged to take CLT 300, Contem- 
)rary Literary Theory. 

eginning with the Class of 2004, 
le following will be the only major 
ffered. 

1ENCH STUDIES 

?quirements: ten 4-credit courses at the 230 

yel or above, including: 
The basis for the French Studies major: 253, 
254, or an equivalent accepted by the depart- 
ment; 

The language requirement: two four-credit, 
300-level language courses; 



227 



3. Seven additional four-credit courses, as de- 
tailed below, two of which must be taken at 
the advanced level in the senior year. 

Students majoring in French Studies must have a 
minimum of five 300-level French courses, includ- 
ing the language requirement. Majors just take at 
least two courses in periods before the nineteenth 
century and one course covering the nineteenth- 
or twentieth century; 253 and above may count 
toward this distribution requirement. Students may 
take up to two courses relating to France or the 
Francophone world from appropriate offerings in 
other departments. Only one course counting to- 
ward the major may be taken for an S/U grade. 
Students considering graduate school in French 
Studies are encouraged to take CLT 300, Contem- 
porary Literary Theory. 

Honors 

Director: Martine Gantrel 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

431 Thesis 

8 credits 

Offered Fall semester each year 

Requirements: a student eligible for the honors 
program may enter it as a junior or before the end 
of the second week of classes in September of her 
senior year. It is possible to enter the honors pro- 
gram as early as the second semester of the junior 
year. In addition to the normal requirements of the 
major, the candidate will write a thesis over the 
course of either one or two semesters. A one-se- 
mester thesis is due in the first week of the second 
semester of the senior year. A two-semester thesis 
is due by April 1 5 of the senior year. In the second 
semester of the senior year, the candidate will take 
an oral examination based on her thesis and the 
field in which it was written. The thesis may be 
written in either English or French. The choice of 
language must be approved by the thesis director 
and the honors adviser. Prospective entrants are 



228 

advised to begin planning their work well in 
advance and undertake preliminary research 
and reading during the second semester of the 
junior year. 

Graduate 

Adviser: Ann Leone. 

559 The Teaching of French 

Practical exercises in foreign language teaching 
supported by exposure to past and current theo- 
ries of second language acquisition. Topics in- 
clude: teaching for cultural understanding; plan- 
ning instruction for the development of speaking, 
listening, writing and reading skills; how to estab- 
lish objectives; how to present, personalize, and 
review material; the accuracy issue; formats for 
proficiency-oriented classroom testing. Open to 
seniors and students preparing for teacher certifi- 
cation. {F} 4 credits 
Janie Vanpee 
Offered Spring 2003 

580 Advanced Studies 

Arranged in consultation with the department. 

4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

580d Advanced Studies 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

590 Research and Thesis 

4 or 8 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

590d Research and Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 



229 



Geology 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



ofessors 

H. Robert Burger, Ph.D., Chair 

H. Allen Curran, Ph.D. 

hn B. Brady, Ph.D. 

)bert M. Newton, Ph.D. 



Assistant Professors 

Bosiljka Glumac, Ph.D. 
Amy Larson Rhodes, Ph.D. 
Mark E. Brandriss, Ph.D. 

Laboratory Instructors 

Neil E. Tibert, M.Sc. 
Stephen Nathan 



udents contemplating a major in geology should 
ect 111, 108, 121 or FYS 134andseea'depart- 
ental adviser as early as possible. All 100-level 
mrses may be taken without prerequisites. 

35 Natural Disasters: Understanding and 
aping 

i analysis of earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, 
ilcanic eruptions, landslides, and tornadoes. 
>pics include: the current status of predicting 
sasters, how to minimize their impact, public 
)licy issues, the effect of disasters on the course 
human history, and the record of past great 
sasters in myth and legend. Intended for 
)nscience majors. {N} 4 credits 
ibert Burger 
ffered Fall 2002, Fall 2004 

D8 Oceanography 

i introduction to the global marine environment, 
ith emphasis on seafloor dynamics, submarine 
pography and sediments, the nature and circula- 
>n of oceanic waters, ocean- atmosphere interac- 
ts, coastal processes, marine biologic produc- 
ity and pollution and exploitation of the oceans 
■ humans. One field trip to the Massachusetts 
)ast and one optional oceanographic training 
arise. {N} Wl 4 credits 
til Tibert, Spring 2003 
'len Curran, Spring 2004 
ffered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 



109 The Environment 

A study of the interrelationships between various 
elements of the earth's environment and human 
activity. Topics include effects of acid rain, ground- 
water and surface water pollution, global climate 
change, and land-use planning. {N} 4 credits 
Amy Rhodes 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

111 Introduction to Earth Processes and 
History 

An exploration of the concepts that provide a uni- 
fying explanation for the causes of earthquakes 
and volcanic eruptions and the formation of 
mountains, continents, and oceans. A discussion 
of the origin of life on earth, the patterns of evolu- 
tion and extinction in plants and animals, and the 
rise of humans. Labs and field trips in the local 
area will examine evidence for ancient volcanoes, 
earthquakes, rivers, ice ages, and dinosaur habi- 
tats. {N} 4 credits 
Amy Rhodes', Fall 2002 
Mark Brandriss, Spring 2003 
Robert Sewton, Fall 2003 
Bosiljka Glumac, Spring 2004 
Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003, Fall 2003, 
Spring 2004 

121 Geology in the Field 

Clues to over 500 million years of earth history 
can be found in rocks and sediments near Smith 



230 



Geoli 



College. Students in this course will attempt to 
decipher this history by careful examination of 
field evidence. Class meetings will take place prin- 
cipally outdoors at interesting geological localities 
around the Connecticut Valley. Participants will 
prepare regular reports based on their observa- 
tions and reading, building to a final paper on the 
geologic history of the area. The course normally 
includes a weekend field trip to Cape Cod. Enroll- 
ment limited to 14. Priority will be given to first 
and second year students. {N} Wl 4 credits 
John Brady 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

FYS 131 Environmental Issues on Campus 

This course will evaluate the environmental impact 
of land use activity on the water quality and hy- 
drology of the Mill River, which forms the Smith 
College campus pond. Class time will be spent 
making stream measurements and observations 
and performing laboratory analyses on water or 
soil samples collected in the field. We also will use 
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to evaluate 
land use cover types and interpret water quality 
data. Enrollment limited to 14 first year students. 
(E) {N} Wl, Q 4 credits 
Amy Rhodes (Geology) 
Offered Fall 2002 

221 Mineralogy 

A project-oriented study of minerals and the infor- 
mation they contain about planetary processes. 
The theory and application to mineralogic prob- 
lems of crystallography, crystal chemistry, crystal 
optics, x-ray diffraction, quantitative x-ray spec- 
troscopy, and other spectroscopic techniques. The 
course normally includes a weekend field trip to 
important geologic localities in the Adirondack 
Mountains. Prerequisite: 111, 108, 121 or FYS 
134. {N} 4 credits 
John Brady, Fall 2002 
Mark Brandriss, Fall 2003 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

222 Petrology 

An examination of typical igneous and metamor- 
phic rocks in the laboratory and in the field in 
search of clues to their formation. Lab work will 
emphasize the microscopic study of rocks in thin 



section. Weekend field trips to Cape Ann and Ve 

mont are an important part of the course. Prere 

uisite: 221. {N} 4 credits 

John Brady 

Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

231 Invertebrate Paleontology and 
Paleoecology 

A study of the major groups of fossil invertebrat 
including their phylogenetic relationships, palec 
ecology, and geologic-biostratigraphic importar 
Special topics include speciation, functional ad; 
tations, paleoenvironments, consideration of th< 
earliest forms of life, and the record of extinctic 
Weekend field trips to the coast and New York 
State. Prerequisite: 111, 108, 121 or FYS 134; 
open without prerequisite to majors in biologic; 
sciences. {N} 4 credits 
Neil Tibert, Fall 2002 
Allen Curran, Fall 2003 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

232 Sedimentoiogy 

A project-oriented study of the processes and 
products of sediment formation, transport, dep< 
tion and lithification. Modern sediments and de 
sitional environments of the Massachusetts coas 
are examined and compared with ancient sedi- 
mentary rocks of the Connecticut River Valley ai 
eastern New York. Field and laboratory analyses 
focus on the description and classification of se 
mentary rocks, and on the interpretation of thei 
origin. The results provide unique insights into 
geologic history of eastern North America. Two 
weekend field trips. Prerequisite: 111, 108, 121 
FYS 134. {N} 4 credits 
Bosiljka Glumac 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

241 Structural Geology 

The study and interpretation of rock structures, 
with emphasis on the mechanics of deformatioi 
behavior of rock materials, and methods of anai 
sis. Weekend field trip to Rhode Island. Prereqi- 
site: 111, 121 or FYS 134, and 232 or 222. {N}t 
4 credits 
Robert Burger 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2005 



oology 



231 



46 Geology of Death Valley 

lis field-oriented course will examine the diverse 
oology of Death Valley including its geomorpho- 
gical evolution and its structural and volcanic 
story. Special attention will be directed to those 
•ocesses currently modifying Death Valley's land- 
:ape. Prerequisites: 1 1 1 or equivalent and per- 
ission of the instructor. {N} 4 credits 
obert Burger 
ffered Spring 2003 

51 Geomorphology 

ie study of landforms and their significance in 
rms of the processes that form them. Selected 
ference is made to examples in the New England 
bgion and the classic landforms of the world, 
taring the first part of the semester laboratories 
ill involve learning to use geographic information 
stem (GIS) software to analyze landforms. Dur- 
; g the second part of the semester laboratories 
ill include field trips to examine landforms in the 
leal area. Prerequisite: 111, 108, 121 or FYS 
54. {N} 4 credits 
obert Newton 

ffered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 
i 

70j Carbonate Systems and Coral Reefs of 
ie Bahamas 

i field-oriented course to examine the diverse 
■irbonate sediment-producing, modern environ- 
ments typical of the Bahama Islands, including a 
iriety of shallow subtidal shelf environments, 
bral reefs, lagoons, beaches, dunes, and lakes, 
ie Quaternary rocks that cap the islands will be 
iudied to establish paleoenvironmental analogues 
' the modern environments and to understand 
ftter the processes that modify sediments in the 
ansition to the rock record. Students will con- 
jct an individual or small group project. Prereq- 
sites: completion of an introductory-level geol- 
*y course and permission of the instructors. En- 
;)Ument limited to 16. Offered in alternate years. 
N} 3 credits 

ilen Curran, Bosiljka Glumac 
ffered Interterm 2004 

01 Aqueous Geochemistry 

I lis project-based course examines the 
'ochemical reactions that result from interaction 
'water with the natural system. Water and soil 



samples collected from a weekend field trip will 
serve as the basis for understanding principles of 
pH, alkalinity, equilibrium thermodynamics, min- 
eral solubility; soil chemistry, redox reactions, and 
acid rain and mine drainage. The laboratory will 
emphasize wet-chemistry analytical techniques. 
Participants will prepare regular reports based on 
laboratory analyses, building to a final analysis of 
the project study area. One weekend field trip. 
Prerequisite: One geology course and CHM 111. 
Enrollment limited to 9- {N} 4 credits 
Amy Rhodes 
Offered Fall 2003 

PPL 303 Seminar in Public Policy for Marine 
and Coastal Resources 

309 Groundwater Geology 

A study of the occurrence, movement, and exploi- 
tation of water in geologic materials. Topics in- 
clude well hydraulics, groundwater chemistry, the 
relationship of geology to groundwater occur- 
rence, basin-wide groundwater development, and 
groundwater contamination. A class project will 
involve studying a local groundwater problem. 
Prerequisites: 111, 121 or FYS 134, andMTH 111. 
Enrollment limited to 14. {N} 4 credits 
Robert Newton 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2004 

311 Environmental Geophysics 

Theory and environmental applications of geo- 
physical techniques including reflection and re- 
fraction seismology, gravlmetry, electrical resistiv- 
ity, and magnetics. Extensive fieldwork including 
delineating aquifer geometries, determining bur- 
ied landfill boundaries, and mapping leachate 
plumes. Prerequisites: two geology courses at the 
intermediate level, and MTH 111. Enrollment lim- 
ited to 12. {N} 4 credits 
Robert Burger 
Offered Fall 2005 

334 Carbonate Sedimentology 

A detailed study of the formation, deposition, 
lithification, and diagenesis of carbonate sedi- 
ments. Topics include modern carbonate- 
producing environments and the history of 
carbonate rocks from the Precambrian to the 
present. Class meetings will include faculty and 



232 



Geolog 



student presentations and practical work with thin 
sections and hand samples. One weekend field 
trip to classic carbonate localities in New York 
State. Prerequisite: 232a. Enrollment limited to 14. 
{N} 4 credits 
Bosiljka Glumac 
Offered Spring 2003 

355 Geology Seminar 

Topic: Geology and Ecology of Coral Reefs: Past, 
Present and Future 

Open to seniors and qualified juniors with permis- 
sion of the instructor. {N} 3 credits 
Allen Curran and Paulette Peckol 
Offered Spring 2004 

361 Tectonics and Earth History 

A study of the interactions between global tectonic 
processes, continental growth and evolution, the 
formation and destruction of marine basins, and 
the history of life as revealed from the rock and 
fossil record of planet Earth. Student presentations 
and discussions about recent developments in 
geology are central to the course. Prerequisites: 
all intermediate-level required courses in geology, 
any of which may be taken concurrently; geology 
minors with permission of the instructor. {N} 
4 credits 

Mark Brandriss, Spring 2003 
Bosiljka Glumac, Spring 2004 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

400 Advanced Work or Special Problems 
in Geology 

Admission by permission of the department. Pro- 
posals must be submitted in writing to the project 
director by the end of the first week of classes. 
1 to 4 credits 

Members of the Department 
Offered both semesters each year 

For additional offerings, see Five College Course 
Offerings by Five College Faculty. 



The Major 



Advisers: for the class of 2003, Allen Curran; for 
the class of 2004, Amy Rhodes; for the class of 
2005, Robert Newton; for the class of 2006, John 
Brady. 

Advisers for Study Abroad: Robert Newton, 
2002-03; John Brady, 2003-04. 

Basis: 111, or 108, or 121 or FYS 134. 

Requirements: eight semester courses above the 
basis and including the following: 221, 222, 231, 
232, 241, 251, 361 and one additional course at 
the advanced level. Majors planning for graduate 
school will need introductory courses in other 
basic sciences and mathematics. Prospective ma- 
jors should see a departmental adviser as early as 
possible. 

A summer field course is strongly recommended 
for all majors and is a requirement for admission 
to some graduate programs. Majors may petition 
the department to have a summer field course 
substitute for the requirement of a second ad- 
vanced-level course. 



The Minor 



Advisers: same as for the major. 

Many emphases are possible within the geology 
minor. For example, a student interested in earth 
processes and history might take 111, 121 or FYJ 
134, 231, 232, 251, 361, and an elective course, 
student concerned about environmental and re- 
source issues might take 111, 108, 109, 221, 23: 
and 309. Students contemplating a minor in geol 
ogy should see a departmental adviser as early a* 
possible to develop a minor course program. Th 
program must be submitted to the department fo 
approval no later than the beginning of the senio 
year. 

Requirements: six semester courses including 
1 11, or 108, or 121 or FYS 134 and a total of nc 
more than three courses at the 100 level. 



; 



oology 233 

lonors 



Irectors: Amy Rhodes, 2002-03; Allen Curran, 
)03-04. 

30d Thesis 

credits 

jl! year course; Offered each year 

32d Thesis 

I credits 

jII year course; Offered each year 

tsis: 111, or 108, or 121, or FYS 134. 

equirements: seven semester courses above the 
isis and including the following: 221, 222, 231, 
52, 241, 251, and 361. An honors project (430d 
* 432d) pursued during the senior year. Entrance 
/ the beginning of the first semester of the senior 
*ar. Presentation and defense of the thesis. 



'ield Experiences 



le department regularly sponsors a field-based 
Durse. Normally the course takes place one year 
i the Bahamas during Interterm and the following 
>ar in Death Valley, California, or Hawaii during 
)ring break. The Bahamas course concentrates 
ii modern and ancient coral reefs and carbonate 
wironments and utilizes the facilities of the 
erace Research Center on San Salvador Island, 
he Death Valley course focuses on the currently 
:tive structural and geomorphologic processes 
sponsible for Death Valley's present landscape. 

tie Geology Department is a member of the Keck 
eology Consortium, a group of twelve liberal arts 
Dlleges funded by the Keck Foundation to spon- 
)r cooperative student/faculty summer research 
rojects at locations throughout the United States 
<nd abroad. 



234 



German Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

*' Hans Rudolf Vaget, Ph.D. (German Studies and 

Comparative Literature) 

§'JocelyneKolb, Ph.D. 

Margaret Skiles Zelljadt, Ph.D., Chair 

** J Gertraud Gutzmann, Ph.D. 



Assistant Professor 

Mary Ballard Paddock, Ph.D. 

Lecturer 

§- Judith Keyler-Mayer, M.A. 



Associate Professor 

*' Joseph George McVeigh, Ph.D. 



Students who enter with previous preparation in 
German will be assigned to appropriate courses 
on the basis of a placement examination. 

Students who receive a score of 4 or 5 on the 
Advanced Placement test may not apply that credit 
toward the degree if they complete for credit 
lOOd, lOld, HOd, 115, 200, or 220. 

Students who plan to major in German Studies 
or who wish to spend the junior year in Hamburg 
should take German in the first two years. Students 
enrolled in 220, 221, 225, or 226 should consider 
taking the Zertifikat Deutsch examination admin- 
istered by the Goethe Institut offered each spring 
on campus. Courses in European history 7 and in 
other literatures are also recommended. 

German Language 

Credit is not granted for the first semester only of 
the elementary language courses. 

lOOd Elementary German 

An introduction to spoken and written German, 
presenting practical vocabulary and basic expres- 
sions used in conversational practice, simple writ- 
ten exercises, and listening and reading compre- 
hension. Emphasis on development of oral profi- 
ciency as well as gradual acquisition of skills in 
reading and writing German. {F} 8 credits 
Mary Paddock 
Full year course; Offered each year 



lOld Elementary German for Engineering am 
the Sciences 

This introduction to spoken and written German 
incorporates technical vocabulary and expressior 
in conversational practice and grammar instruc- 
tion. Through simple written exercises, as well as 
practice in listening and reading comprehension, 
students in engineering and the sciences will de- 
velop basic writing and conversational skills with 
practical, social and technical applications. The 
course emphasizes the development of oral profi 
ciency and offers an introduction to the culture o 
German-speaking people and countries. {F} 
8 credits 

Judith Keyler-Mayer 
Full year course; Offered each year 

HOd Elementary German (Intensive) 

A fast-paced introduction to German that allows 
rapid acquisition of speaking, reading, wTiting, 
and listening skills as well as cultural knowledge, 
about German-speaking countries using multi- 
media (videos, internet sites, interactive CD- 
ROMS) . Daily oral and written practice through 
role-playing, dialogues, poems, and short storie: 
This course is particularly appropriate for stude J 
who want to acquire a solid foundation in the la 
guage quickly. Students complete the equivalent 
three semesters' work in two semesters, are pre 
pared to enter GER 220 or 221 the following ye; 
and become eligible for study in Hamburg durir 



man Studies 



235 



r junior year. {F} 12 credits for the year 

garet Zelljadt 

I year course; Offered each year 



Mary Paddock, Fall 2002 
Judith Keyler-Mayer. Spring 2003 
Offered both semesters each year 



> German for Reading Knowledge 

> course is a one-semester introduction to 
ling skills designed specifically for students 

> wish to use German secondary sources 
wspapers, journal articles, books) for research 
poses. Emphasis is on the acquisition of skills 
ecognize grammatical constructions, idioms 
vocabulary. Readings of general interest taken 
n a variety of fields will be supplemented by 
erials related to the majors of course partici- 
ts. This course treats reading comprehension 

Is only and is not designed for students who 
i to acquire functional communicative profi- 
icy in German. Open only to juniors and se- 
B who have not taken a college-level German 
rse. {F} 4 credits 
-garet Zelljadt 
?red Spring 2003 

) Low Intermediate German 

view of basic grammatical concepts and the 
ly of new ones, with emphasis on vocabulary 
ding. An introduction to contemporary Ger- 
l culture through literary and journalistic texts, 
i regular practice in written and oral expres- 
L Prerequisite: lOOd, permission of the in- 
etor, or by placement. {F} 4 credits 
ith Keyler-Mayer 
sred Fall 2002 

) High Intermediate German 

oduction and practice of more advanced ele- 
lts of grammar, with an emphasis on expand- 
vocabulary. Discussion of topics in modern 
man culture; development of reading skills 
lg unedited literary and journalistic texts; 
'kly writing assignments. Students are eligible 
ake the examination for the Zertifikat Deutsch 
: is administered at Smith each spring by the 
rthe Institute. The Zertifikat Deutsch is highly 
arded by private and public sector employers 
lU German-speaking countries as proof of well- 
eloped communicative skills in basic German, 
requisite: HOd, 200, permission of the instruc- 
or by placement. {F} 4 credits 



221 Conversation and Composition 

Intensive practice of spoken and written German. 
Weekly assignments in various forms of writing, 
such as the business and personal letter, vita, 
diary, and essay. Prerequisite: HOd, 220, permis- 
sion of the instructor, or by placement. {F} 
4 credits 

Mary Paddock, Fall 2002 
Gertraud Gutzmann, Spring 2003 
Offered both semesters each year 

340 Advanced Composition, Conversation, 
and Style 

A course intended to hone writing skills and per- 
fect spoken German. Practice in different types of 
writing (descriptions, narration, formal letters, 
research papers) and sophisticated grammatical 
structures. Exercises include translations, discus- 
sions, and reports based on literary and journalis- 
tic texts. {F} 4 credits. 
Judith Keyler-Mayer 
Offered Fall 2002 

German Literature and 
Culture 

225 Flights of Fantasy, Fits of Madness 

An introduction to the study of German literature, 
designed to develop skills in oral expression, ex- 
pository writing, and the fundamentals of literary 
analysis. In this course we will closely read texts 
both entertaining and startling that deal with the 
mysteries of the human mind, and with journeys 
experienced or imagined. Film versions of fairy- 
tales, videos of theatre and musical performances. 
Works by the brothers Grimm, Tieck, Hoffmann, 
Freud, Kafka, Seghers and Tawada will provide the 
basis for discussions. Prerequisite: 221, permis- 
sion of the instructor, or by placement. {L/F} 
4 credits 

Gertraud Gutzmann 
Offered Fall 2002 



236 



German Studie 



226 The Culture of Cities: Berlin, Vienna, 
Munich 1820's-1920's 

Berlin, Vienna, and Munich as sites of modern 
culture: the importance of the salon, the 
Kaffeehaus, the theater, and the university for the 
work of Hoffmann, Heine, Fontane, CM. von We- 
ber, Schinkel in Berlin; Schnitzler, Hofmannsthal, 
Freud, Mahler, Klimt in Vienna; Thomas Mann, 
Stefan George, Richard Strauss, Kandinsky in 
Munich. Prerequisite: 221, permission of the in- 
structor, or by placement. {F/L} 4 credits 
Gertraud Gutzmann 
Offered Spring 2003 

334 The Nineteenth Century: Romanticism 
and Realism 

Representative texts (novella, lyric, drama) by 
some of the major writers in 19th-century German 
literature: Heine, Platen, Morike, Grillparzer, 
Nestroy, Wagner, Droste-Hulshoff, Stifter, Keller, 
Raabe, Storm, Busch, Fontane. {L/F} 4 credits 
Mary Paddock 
Offered Spring 2003 

351 Advanced Topics in German Studies 

Topic: Nation and Culture in Austria 
This seminar will study the creation of a national 
political and cultural identity in Austria from the 
collapse of the Habsburg Empire at the close of 
World War I to current discussions surrounding 
the Free Democratic Party of Jorg Haider. Special 
attention will be paid to the function of culture in 
the question of Austrian national identity vis-a-vis 
Germany between 1934 and 1955. Readings: 
Stefan Zweig, Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Anton 
Wildgans, Robert Musil, Franz von Papen and oth- 
ers. {L/F} 4 credits 
Joseph McVeigh 
Offered Spring 2003 



Courses in English 

227 Topics in German Studies 

4 credits 



America and the Germans 
This course will examine the influence and mani- 
festations of German culture in America with a 
particular focus on the last 150 years. After survey 
ing patterns of German immigration to America 
between the 17th-century and the post-World Wai 
II period, questions of cultural assimilation, cul- 
tural maintenance and the changing image of Ger- 
many and German culture in the American media 
will be addressed. Special emphasis will be given 
to the experiences and influence of exiles from 
German-speaking lands in the U.S. after 1848 and 
1933. Also examined will be perceptions of 
America and American culture in German-speak- 
ing lands in the 19th- and 20th-century. Knowl- 
edge of German not required. {L/H} 
Joseph McVeigh 
Offered Spring 2003 

230 Topics in German Cinema 

Topic: Weimar Cinema (1919-1933) 
A study of representative German films from 
Germany's "Golden Age" with emphasis on investi 
gating historical and sociological background; 
influence of Expressionist theater; advent of 
sound; changing role of women; genesis of horrc 
action, and Utopian film; influence on New Ger- 
man Cinema and contemporary popular culture. 
Films by Lang, Murnau, Pabst, Sternberg, Wegem 
and Wiene. Knowledge of film and of German is 
not required, although background in either 
would be useful. (E) {L/H/A} 4 credits 
HansR. Vaget 
Offered Spring 2003 



404 Special Studies 

Arranged in consultation with the department. 
Admission for senior majors by permission of the 
department. 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 



299 Hamburg Preparatory Course 

This course will familiarize students with the Gei 
man university system in general and student life 
in Hamburg in particular. Special emphasis will 
placed on relevant historical, geographical, polii 
cal, and economic aspects of the city-state of Ha 
burg. Required for students who have been ac- 
cepted to the Junior Year in Hamburg and open 
only to them. Weekly written and oral reports 






man Studies 



237 



used on texts, newspaper articles, videos, and 
laterial from the internet. The course will meet 
>r the second half of the semester only. 1 credit 
idith Keyler-Mayer 
iffered Spring 2003 

]ross-listed and 
nterdepartmental Courses 

:LT 259 Realism 

nalysis of 19th-century works in relation to the 
ise of the middle class, the centrality of the family 
id the authority of the father. Emphasis on con- 
entional Realist narration of adultery, broken 
larriage and women's atonement through death 
I novels by Balzac, Fontane and Tolstoy; attention 
) gaps and tensions in such texts, which destabi- 
ze both the family as a social institution and the 
ovel as form. Study of 20th-century Realism will 
)cus on the relations between literature and so- 
ial change (Gorki's The Mother and Brecht's 
[age adaptation) and on founding narratives 
y writers beyond Europe, including Jacques 
oumain, Alejo Carpentier and Jorge Amado. 
1} 4 credits 
] ertraud Gutzmann 
ffered Spring 2003 

:LT 201 Literary Anti-Semitism 

(ow can we tell whether a literary work is anti- 
emitically coded? What are the religious, social, 
ultural factors that shape imaginings of 
ewishness? How does the Holocaust affect the way 
e look at constructions of the Jew today? A selec- 
on of seminal theoretical texts; examples mostly 
om literature but also from opera and cinema, 
hakespeare, Marlow, Cervantes, G.E. Lessing, 
'rimm Brothers, Balzac, Dickens, Wagner, Zola, 

Mann, V. Harlan; S. Friedlander; M. Gelber, S. 
ilman, G. Langmuir, Y.H. Yerushalmi. {L/H} 

credits 
fans Vaget 
'ffered Spring 2003 



Courses Offered on the 
Junior Year in Hamburg 

260 Orientation Program in Hamburg 

The Orientation Program has three main goals: 
1) to ensure daily practice in spoken and written 
German needed for study at the Universitat Ham- 
burg; 2) to offer a comprehensive introduction to 
current affairs in Germany (political parties, news- 
papers and magazines, economic concerns); 3) to 
provide opportunity for extensive exposure to the 
cultural and social life of Hamburg and its envi- 
rons. Students are also introduced to German ter- 
minology and methodology in their respective 
majors and to a characteristic German form of 
academic oral presentation, the Referat. The Ori- 
entation Program culminates in the presentation 
of an oral report on a topic in each student's aca- 
demic area of concentration. 2 credits 
Manfred Bonus, Ute Michel, Andreas Stuhlmann 
Offered Fall 2002 for six weeks on the Junior 
Year in Hamburg 

270 German History and Culture from 1871 
to 1945 

This course covers the Wilhelminian Empire, the 
Weimar Republic, and the Third Reich. For the 
Weimar Republic, the focus will be on the politi- 
cal, economic, social, and cultural issues the re- 
public was facing. For the Third Reich, we will 
focus on the establishment of dictatorship; the 
persecution of Jews; everyday life in Hitler Ger- 
many; World War II; resistance and opposition; 
the end of the Third Reich. Limited to students 
enrolled in the JY\ program. {H/F} 4 credits. 
Rainer Nicolaysen 

Offered Fall 2002 on the Junior Year in 
Hamburg 

280 Theater in Hamburg: Topics and Trends 
in Contemporary German Theater 

This course offers an introduction to the German 
theater system; its historical and social role; its 
economics and administration. We will study the 
semiotics of theater and learn the technical vo- 
cabulary to describe and judge a performance. 
Plays will be by German authors from different 
periods. The JiA program will cover the cost of the 



238 



German Studies 



tickets. Attendance at four or five performances is 

required. Limited to students enrolled in the JYA 

program. {L/A/F} 4 credits 

Jutta Gutzeit 

Offered Fall 2002 on the Junior Year in 

Hamburg 

290 Studies in Language II 

The objective of this course is to improve written 
and oral skills by building on work done during 
the orientation program. Emphasis in class will be 
on treatment of complex grammatical structures 
as well as dictations, grammar and listening com- 
prehension. Students will be taught how to present 
a term paper {Hausarbeit) in the German fash- 
ion. In addition, there will be an optional weekly 
phonetics mtorial. {F} 4 credits 
Jutta Gutzeit 

Offered Fall 2002 on the Junior Year in 
Hamburg 

310 Studies in Language III 

The objective of this course is to improve written 
and oral skills by building on work done during 
the orientation program or the winter semester. 
Emphasis in class will be on treatment of complex 
grammatical structures as well as dictations, 
grammar and listening comprehension. Students 
taking the course in the winter semester will be 
taught how to present a term paper {Hausarbeit) 
in the German fashion. In addition, there will be 
an optional weekly phonetics mtorial. Preparation 
for the qualifying exam "Deutsch als 
Fremdsprache" at the Universitat Hamburg. Pre- 
requisite: 290 or by placement. {F} 4 credits 
Jutta Gutzeit 

Offered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 on the Junior 
Year in Hamburg 

320 Germany 1945-1990: Politics, Society, 
and Culture in the Two German States 

This is a continuation of 270. The course will 
cover the post-war period of occupation; the 
founding of two German states; German-German 
relations during the Cold War; and the re-unifica- 
tion of Germany. Historical analysis; reading of 
selected literary works; screening of films. Prereq- 
uisite: 270, or permission of the instructor. Lim- 
ited to students enrolled in the JYA program. 



{L/H/F} 4 credits 

Rainer Nicolaysen 

Offered Spring 2003 on the Junior Year 

in Hamburg 

334 The Nineteenth Century: Romanticism 
and Realism 

Topic: Realism 

Representative texts (novella, lyric, drama) by 

some of the major writers in 19th century German 

literature: Heine, Platen, Mbrike, Grillparzer, 

Nestroy, Wagner, Droste-Hulshoff, Stifter, Keller, 

Raabe, Storm, Busch, Fontane. {L/F} 4 credits 

Ulrich Bubrowski 

Offered Spring 2003 on Junior Year in 

Hamburg 



The Major 



Advisers: for the class of 2003, Margaret Zelljadt 
for the class of 2004, Jocelyne Kolb; for the class 
of 2005, Judith Keyler-Mayer. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Judith Keyler-Mayer. i 

Requirements: Ten courses: 
221,225,226,332,334,336,340,351 

Two of: 151, 227, 230 

Both 340 and 351 must be taken at Smith. 

Courses taken during the Junior Year Abroad in 
Hamburg will be numbered differently and will b 
considered equivalent to (and upon occasion cai 
be substituted for) required courses offered on 
the Smith campus, subject to the approval of the 
Department. 

Students are encouraged to take courses outside 
the Department of German Studies, specifically 
courses in comparative literature, art history, mi 
sic history, history, government, and philosophy, 
list of suggested courses is available in the depai 
ment office, Hatfield Hall. 



prm an Studies ^ 239 

me Minor 

dvisers: for the class of 2003, Margaret Zelljadt; 
r the class of 2004, Jocelyne Kolb; for the class 
; 2005, Judith Keyler-Mayer. 

equirements: Six courses: 

1,225,226 

vo of: 332, 334, 336, 340. 351 

neof: 151.22", 230 

)th 340 and 351 must be taken at Smith. 

)urses taken during the Junior Year Abroad in 
amburg will be numbered differently and will be 
msidered equivalent to (and upon occasion can 
: substituted for) required courses offered on 
e Smith campus, subject to the approval of the 
epartment. 

lonors 

irector: Margaret Zelljadt. 

31 Thesis 

credits 

ffered Fall semester each year 

equirements: the same as for the Major. 



240 



Government 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

Donald Leonard Robinson, M.Div., Ph.D. 

Susan C. Bourque, Ph.D. 

** 2 Steven Martin Goldstein, Ph.D. 

Donna Robinson Divine, Ph.D. 

Martha A. Ackelsberg, Ph.D., Chair (Government 

and Women's Studies) 
Donald C. Baumer, Ph.D. 
Dennis Yasutomo, Ph.D. 
Patrick Coby, Ph.D. 

Gwendolen M. Carter Visiting Professor 

*' Catharine Newbury, Ph.D. 

Associate Professors 

§'**- Howard Gold, Ph.D. 
Velma E. Garcia, Ph.D. 
t 1 Gregory White, Ph.D. 
Alice L Hearst, J.D., Ph.D. 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Robert Hauck, Ph.D. 



Assistant Professors 

Gary Lehring, Ph.D. 
Marc Lendler, Ph.D. 
Mlada Bukovansky, Ph.D. 
Michael Clancy, Ph.D. 

Instructor 

Tandeka Nkiwane, M.A. 

Lecturers 

Sally KatzenDykJ.D. 
Michael Klare 
Jon Western 
Preston Smith 

Senior Laboratory Instructor 

Molly Jahnige Robinson, M.A. 

Associated Faculty 

Gwendolvn Mink, Ph.D. (Women's Studies) 



For first-year students in their first semester, ad- 
mission to 200-level courses is only by permission 
of the instructor. 

Seminars require the permission of the in- 
structor and ordinarily presume as a prerequisite 
a 200-level course in the same field. 

100 Introduction to Political Thinking I 

Open to all students. Students considering a gov- 
ernment major are strongly encouraged to take 
GOV 100 in their first or second year. A study of 
the leading ideas of the Western political tradition, 
focusing on such topics as justice, power, author- 
ity, freedom, equality and democracy. Two lectures 
and one discussion. One or more discussion sec- 
tions are designated as Writing Intensive (Wl). {S} 
4 credits 



Martha Ackelsberg and Members of the Depart 

ment, Fall 2002 

Gary Lehring and Members of the Department 

Fall 2003 

Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

190 Empirical Methods in Political Science 

The fundamental problems in summarizing, inte 
preting, and analyzing empirical data. Topics in- 
clude research design and measurement, descri' 
tive statistics, sampling, significance tests, corre) 
tion, and regression. Special attention will be pa 
to survey data and to data analysis using compui 
software. {S/M} 4 credits 
Molly Robinson, Fall 2002 
Howard Gold Molly Robison, Fall 2003 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 



overnment 



241 



unerican Government 

00 is suggested preparation for all other courses 
i this field. 

00 American Government 

study of the politics and governance in the 
nited States. Special emphasis is placed on how 
te major institutions of American government are 
ifluenced by public opinion and citizen behavior, 
nd how all of these forces interact in the determi- 
ation of government policy. The course will in- 
lude at least one internet-based assignment. {S} 
credits 

onald Baumer 
ffered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

01 American Constitutional Interpretation 

he study of Supreme Court decisions, documents, 
nd other writings dealing with Constitutional 
leory and interpretation. Special attention is given 
> understanding the institutional role of the Su- 
reme Court. Not open to first-year students. {S} 
credits 
lice Hearst 
ffered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

02 American Constitutional Law: The Bill 
f Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment 

undamental rights of persons and citizens as in- 
■rpreted by decisions of the Supreme Court, with 
mphasis on the interpretation of the Bill of Rights 
tid the Fourteenth Amendment. {S} 4 credits 
lice Hearst 
ffered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

04 Urban Politics 

he growth and development of political commu- 
ities in metropolitan areas in the United States, 
ith specific reference to the experiences of 
omen, black and white. Focus on the social 
ructuring of space; the ways patterns of urban 
evelopment reflect prevailing societal views on 
elations of race, sex, and class; intergovernmental 
Nations; and the efforts of people — through gov- 
rnmental action or popular movements — to af- 
Jd the nature and structure of the communities 
i which they live. {S} 4 credits 
o be announced 
'ffered Spring 2003 



205 Colloquium: Law, Family and State 

Explores the status of the family in American po- 
litical life, and its role as a mediating structure 
between the individual and the state. Emphasis will 
be placed on the role of the courts in articulating 
the rights of the family and its members. Limited 
enrollment. Suggested preparation GOV 202 or 
WST 225. {S} 4 credits 
Alice Hearst 
Offered Spring 2003 

206 The American Presidency 

An analysis of the executive power in its constitu- 
tional setting and of the changing character of the 
executive branch. {S} 4 credits 
Marc Lendler 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

207 Politics of Public Policy 

A thorough introduction to the study of public 
policy in the United States. A theoretical overview 
of the policy process provides the framework for 
an analysis of several substantive policy areas, to 
be announced at the beginning of the term. {S} 
4 credits 
Donald Baumer 
Offered Fall 2003 

208 Elections in the Political Order 

An examination and analysis of electoral politics in 
the United States. Voting and elections are viewed 
in the context of democracy. Topics include elec- 
toral participation, presidential selection, cam- 
paigns, electoral behavior, public opinion, parties, 
and Congressional elections. Special attention will 
be paid to the 2000 presidential election. {S} 
4 credits 
Marc Lendler 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

210 Public Opinion and Mass Media in the 
United States 

This course examines and analyzes American pub- 
he opinion and the impact of the mass media on 
politics. Topics include political socialization, po- 
litical culture, attitude formation and change, link- 
ages between public opinion and policy, and the 
use of surveys to measure public opinion. Empha- 
sis on the media's role in shaping public prefer- 
ences, and politics. {S} 4 credits 



242 



Governmei 



Howard Gold 
Offered Fall 2004 

211 Colloquium: The Regulatory Process: 
A Window into How the Federal Government 
Works 

Regulations constitute an important instrument of 
government, and are one of the easiest ways for a 
President to make his/her mark. We will study the 
institutional interests and the role — in theory and 
in practice — of the various entities that are in- 
volved in the regulatory process, including Con- 
gress, the President, the agencies (both Executive 
Branch and independent regulatory agencies), the 
Office of Management and Budget, and the courts. 
We will explore the procedures the agencies fol- 
low in developing regulations, especially those 
involving the public, and the role of science and 
economics in the decision-making process. Spe- 
cific case studies, including seat belt and air bag 
regulations, various environmental regulations, 
and safety and health regulations, will be used 
to illustrate how the principles associated with 
American government — such as separation of 
powers, federalism, and accountability — play 
out in Washington, DC. Limited enrollment {S} 
4 credits 
Sally Katzen 
Offered Fall 2002 



Pathologies of Power 
A comparative examination of McCarthyism, 
Watergate and Iran-Contra. A look at how our 
political institutions function under stress. Prereq 
uisite: a 200 level course in American Govern- 
ment. 

Marc Lendler 
Offered Spring 2003 

305 Seminar in American Government 

Topic: Technology Policy in the Information Ag 
This seminar will examine the challenges posed 
by the "Information Revolution" that has been 
brought about by increasingly powerful comput- 
ers, the global Internet, and the digital economy. 
Issues to be addressed include: how is policy 
made, and what are the respective roles of goverr 
ment and the private sector in policy making? Ho 
important are privacy, security and authenticity, 
and how can these be reconciled with the legiti- 
mate needs of law enforcement (particularly aftei 
9/11)? And what are the implications of a growinj 
digital economy for economic and social inequal- 
ity? {S} 4 credits 
Sally Katzen 
Offered Fall 2002 

306 Seminar in American Government 

{S} 4 credits 



214 Colloquium: Free Speech in America 

An examination of the application of the First 
Amendment in historical context. Special attention 
to contemporary speech rights controversies. Lim- 
ited enrollment. {S} 4 credits 
Marc Lendler 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

216 Minority Politics 

An examination of political issues facing the mi- 
nority communities of American society. Topics 
include electoral politics, social movements, and 
gender and class issues. {S} 4 credits 
Velma Garcia 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

304 Seminar in American Government 

{S} 4 credits 



Politics and the Environment 
An examination of environmental policy making 
within the federal government, with special em- 
phasis on how Congress deals with environment 
policy issues. A variety of substantive policy areas 
from clean air to toxic waste will be covered. Stu- 
dents will complete research papers on an envi- 
ronmental policy topic of their choice. Prerequi-i 
site: a 200-level course in American Government 
Donald Baumer 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

307 Seminar in American Government 

Topic: Latinos and Politics in the U.S. 

An examination of the role of Latinos in society 

and politics in the U.S. Issues to be analyzed in- > 

elude immigration, education, electoral politics, 

and gender. {S} 4 credits 

Velma Garcia 

Offered Fall 2002 



jviTiiment 



243 



08 Seminar in American Government 
topic: Conversations in the Oval Office (the 
(pes of the Kennedy Johnson, and Nixon 
^ministrations). {S} 4 credits 
onald Robinson 
ffered Fall 2003 

11 Seminar in Urban Politics 

IS} 4 credits 

ommu n it j ' Development 
le course engages students in the theories, de- 
ites. and strategies regarding the revitalization of 
ner citv* communities. Examines what roles busi- 
es, government, and nonprofit community- 
ised organizations (the "third sector") play in 
:3veloping "blighted" neighborhoods. Topics 
elude economic development, affordable hous- 
g, equal and accessible social services and po- 
ical organizing. Features speakers from related 
?lds of community development. In this commu- 
ty-based learning course, students conduct re- 
arch projects generated by community-based 
rganizations in Holyoke and Springfield. Focuses 
1 helping students integrate knowledge derived 
om class discussions, speakers, and their re- 
>arch experience. 
reston Smith 
ffered Fall 2002 

he Politics of Urban Social Movements 
D exploration of theoretical and case-study mate- 
al on social movements in the urban context. 
ell be looking at both historical and contempo- 
iry studies of groups that have organized in an 
rban context to resist structures and practices of 
omination and/or to envision new urban social 
wironments. Questions to be explored include: 
"hat is the relationship between workplace-based 
id community-based movements? What have 
een the particular roles of women in urban 
lovements? How are patterns of consciousness 
nd activism constructed by the interaction of 
ice, class, and gender? 
be announced 
ffered Spring 2003 

12 Seminar in American Government 

opic: Political Behavior in the United States 
n examination of selected topics related to 



American political behavior. Themes include em- 
pirical analysis, partisanship, voting behavior and 
turnout, public opinion, and racial attitudes. Stu- 
dent projects will involve analysis of survey data. 
Permission of the instructor is required. {S} 
4 credits 
Howard Gold 
Offered Fall 2003 

411 Washington Seminar in American 
Government 

Policy-making in the national government. Open 
only to members of the Semester-in-Washington 
Program. Given in Washington, D.C. 4 credits 
Robert Hauck 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

412 Semester-in-Washington Research 
Project 

Open only to members of the Semester-in- 
Washington Program. 8 credits 
Donald Baumer 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

413 Washington Seminar: The Art and Craft 
of Political Science Research 

This seminar is designed to provide students par- 
ticipating in the Washington Internship Program 
with an overview of the various approaches to con- 
ducting research in the discipline of political sci- 
ence. Students will be introduced to methods of 
quantitative and qualitative research, data acquisi- 
tion and hypothesis testing. The seminar's more 
specific goal is to help students understand the 
process of planning, organizing, and writing an 
analytical political science research paper. Enroll- 
ment limited to juniors and seniors in the Wash- 
ington Internship Program. {S} 2 credits 
Robert J.P. Hauck 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 



Comparative Government 

220 Politics and Society 

A comparison of the development and functioning 
of political institutions in Europe, the United 
States, the former Soviet Union, and selected Third 
World nations. Emphasis on the interrelationship 
between politics and the broader socioeconomic 



244 



Governme 



and cultural environment. {S} 4 credits 

Steven Goldstein 

Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

221 The Politics of Western Europe 

This course focuses on the development of West- 
ern European democratic institutions in the con- 
text of military and economic conflict and coop- 
eration. Includes an introduction to the process 
of European integration. 
{S} 4 credits 
Mlada Bukovansky 
Offered Fall 2003 

223 Government and Politics of Russia 

An examination of the revolutionary origins, devel- 
opment, and dissolution of the Soviet state fol- 
lowed by a discussion of the issues confronting 
Russia. {S} 4 credits 
Steven Goldstein 
Offered Fall 2004 

224 Islam and Politics in the Middle East 

An analysis of traditional Muslim political societies 
in the Middle East and of the many ways in which 
they were transformed into nation states. Issues 
addressed include nationalism, religious political 
activism, colonialism, and globalization. Readings 
will also cover such topics as regional conflicts, 
revolutions as well as the impact of these disparate 
developments on the position of women. {S} 
4 credits 

Donna Robinson Divine 
Offered Fall 2002 

225 The Founding of Constitutional Systems 

An analysis of constitutional foundings in newly 
independent and conquered nations. The Ameri- 
can case is compared with Japan, Germany, and 
selected nations in Eastern Europe and the Third 
World. {S} 4 credits 
Donald Robinson 
Offered Spring 2004 

226 Latin American Political Systems 

A comparative analysis of Latin American political 
systems. Emphasis on the politics of development, 
the problems of leadership, legitimacy, and regime 
continuity. A wide range of countries and political 
issues will be covered. {S} 4 credits 



Velma Garcia, (Spring 2003) 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

227 Contemporary African Politics 

This survey course examines the ever-changing 
political and economic landscape of the African 
continent. The course aims to provide students 
with an understanding of the unique historical, 
economic and social variables that shape moden 
African politics, and will introduce students to 
various theoretical and analytical approaches to 
the study of Africa's political development. Centn 
themes will include the ongoing processes of na- 
tion-building and democratization, the constitu- 
tional question, the international relations of Af- 
rica, issues of peace and security, and Africa's 
political economy. {S} 4 credits 
Tandeka Nkiwane 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

228 Government and Politics of Japan 

An introductory survey and analysis of the develo 
ment of postwar Japanese politics. Emphasis on 
Japanese political culture and on formal and infc 
mal political institutions and processes, includin; 
political parties, the bureaucracy, interest groups 
and electoral and factional politics. {S} 4 credits 
Dennis Yasutomo 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

230 Government and Politics of China 

Treatment of traditional and transitional China, 
followed by analysis of the political system of the 
Chinese People's Republic. Discussion centers o 
such topics as the role of ideology; problems of 
economic and social change, policy formulation 
and patterns of party and state power. {S} 
4 credits 

Steven Goldstein 
Offered Fall 2003 

231 Colloquium: Southern African Politics 

Focusing on the domestic and international poli 
tics of the region, this course will explore the p( 
formance and prospects for regional political ai 
economic development in comparative perspec 
tive. Discussions will center on regional conflict 
and cooperation, leadership and democratizatu 
Limited enrollment. {S} 4 credits 
Tandeka \kiwane 
Offered Fall 2004 



.MTnment 



245 



32 Women and Politics in Africa 

i lis course will explore the genesis and effects of 
blitical activism by women in Africa, which some 
•lieve represents a new African feminism, and its 
lplications for state/civil society relations in con- 
i mporary Africa. Topics will include the historical 
feds of colonialism on the economic, social, and 
plitical roles of African women, the nature of 
■ban/rural distinctions, and the diverse re- 
Mnses by women to the economic and political 
ises of postcolonial African polities. Case studies 
i specific African countries, with readings of nov- 
e and women's life histories as well as analyses 
j social scientists. {S} 4 credits 
itharine Newbury 
ffered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 



322 Seminar in Comparative Government 

Topic: Mexican Politics [row l ( JI()-hvsent 
An in-depth examination of contemporary political 
and social issues in Mexico. The country, once 
described as the "perfect dictatorship," is in the 
process of undergoing a series of deep political 
and economic changes. This seminar provides an 
examination of the historical foundations of mod- 
ern Mexican politics, beginning with the Revolu- 
tion. In addition, it examines a series of current 
challenges, including the transition from one-party 
rule, the neo liberal economic experiment and 
NAFTA, border issues, the impact of drug traffick- 
ing, and rebellion in Chiapas. {S} 4 credits 
Velma Garcia 
Offered Fall 2003 



33 Problems in Political Development 

I »cial change and political development in the 
lird World. Topic: Development and Democracy. 
;} 4 credits 

Michael Clancy 

I ffered Spring 2003 

; 37 Colloquium: Politics and the U.S./ 
: exico Border 

its lis course examines the most important issues 
cing the U.S./Mexico border: NAFTA, industrial- 
ation, and the emergence of the maquiladoras 
win plants); labor migration and immigration; 
e environment; drug trafficking; the militariza- 
, )n of the border; and border culture and identity. 
lit le course begins with a comparison of contend- 
1 g perspectives on globalization before proceed- 
I g to a short overview of the historical literature 
o£ i the creation of the U.S./Mexico border. Though 
the present time the border has become in- 
easingly militarized, the boundary dividing the 
S. and Mexico has traditionally been relatively 
)rous, allowing people, capital, goods, and ideas 
flow back and forth. The course will focus on 
s e border as a region historically marked both by 
i )nflict and interdependence. Open to majors in 
| wernment and/or Latin American Studies; others 
It V permission of the instructor. {S} 4 credits 
e( ima Garcia 
% ffered Spring 2003 

i 



323 Seminar in Comparative Government 

Topic: Warring for Heaven and Earth: Jewish 
and Muslim Political Activism in the Middle 
East 

This seminar explores the rise and spread of Jew- 
ish and Muslim political activism in the Middle 
East with a special focus on those which operate 
in Egypt, Lebanon, Israel, the Palestinian territo- 
ries, and in Saudi Arabia. The particular groups 
addressed include Gush Emunim, Kach, Israel's 
Redemption Movements, Hamas Hizbullah, Is- 
lamic Jihad in both the Palestinian territories and 
in Egypt, and al-Queda. The reading material fo- 
cuses on the conditions giving rise to these various 
activist groups and examines their political objec- 
tives. The social organization of these movements 
will also be explored particularly with regard to 
gender and the consequences of globalization. {S} 
4 credits 

Donna Robinson Divine 
Offered Spring 2003 

324 Seminar in Comparative Government 

Topic: Elections in Southern Africa 
The seminar focuses on the recent general elec- 
tions in Zimbabwe, Zambia and South Africa. Us- 
ing data from the 1999 general elections in South 
Africa, the 2000 parliamentary elections in Zimba- 
bwe, the 2001 general elections in Zambia and the 
2002 presidential elections in Zimbabwe, smdents 
will do an in-depth study of the deepening of de- 
mocracy in the region. How strong are the ruling 
parties? What is the state of opposition politics in 



246 



Governme 



Southern Africa? The course will conclude with 
some observations and indicators of future trends 
in the region. {S} 4 credits 
Tandeka Ski wane 
Offered Fall 2002 

International Relations 

24 1 is suggested preparation for all other courses 
in this held. 

241 International Politics 

An introduction to the theoretical and empirical 
analysis of states in the international system. Em- 
phasis is given to the role of international institu- 
tions, the influence of the world economy on inter- 
national relations, and the increasing prominence 
of global issues such as the environment, human 
rights, and humanitarian aid. {S} 4 credits 
Michael Clancy, Fall 2002 
Mlada Bukoransky. Spring 2003 
Gregory White, Fail 2003 
Tandeka Ski wane, Spring 2004 
Offered both semesters each year 

242 International Political Economy 

This course begins with an examination of the 
broad theoretical paradigms in international po- 
litical economy (IPE). including the liberal, eco- 
nomic nationalist, and neo-Marxist perspectives. 
How universal are these paradigms, and what are 
their sourses of critique? The course analyzes criti- 
cal debates in the post-World War II period, in- 
cluding the role of the Bretton Woods institutions 
(World Bank group and IMF) . international trade 
and development, the debt question, poverty and 
global inequality, and the broad question of "glo- 
balization." Prerequisite: 2-41 or permission of the 
instructor. {S} 4 credits 
Tandeka Si ki wane 
Offered Spring 2003 

244 Foreign Policy of the United States 

This course analyzes the domestic and interna- 
tional sources of U.S. foreign poliq". The substan- 
tive focus of the course is on the post-Ww'TI era, 
and includes the following case studies: the Cuban 
Missile Crisis, Somalia, Tiananmen Square and 
Lebanon. The foreign policy process, the instru- 



ments of U.S. foreign poliq- or the international 
context of U.S. foreign poliq- will be examined fc 
each case. Prerequisite: 241 or permission of thi 
instructor. {S} 4 credits 
Michael Clancy 
Offered Spring 2003 

248 The Arab-Israeli Dispute 

.An analysis of the causes of the dispute and of 
efforts to resolve it; an examination of Great Pow 
involvement. A historical survey of the influence 
Great Power rivalry on relationships between Is- 
rael and the Arab States and between Israelis anc 
Palestinian Arabs. Consideration of the several 
.Arab-Israeli wars and the tensions, terrorism, an 
violence unleashed by the dispute. {S} 4 credits 
Donna Robinson Dili fie 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

250 Case Studies in International Relations 

The development and application of theoretical 
concepts of international relations: examination 
historical events and poliq decisions; testing the 
lies against the realities of state behavior and dip 
lomatic practice. In Fall 2002, the course will fo- 
cus on the international political ramifications oi 
transboundary environmental problems and gro 1 
ing competition for scarce and valuable resourct 
In particular we'll examine the ways in which th 
international community is responding to such 
problems as global climate change, w T ater scarcii 
global competition for energy supplies, deforest; 
tion.. land degradation, and fisheries depletion. I 
each case, emphasis will be placed on the pros- 
pects both for conflict and cooperation in addre 
ing global problems. (E) {S} 
Michael Klare 
Offered Fall 2002 

251 Foreign Policy of Japan 

The socio-cultural, political, and economic four 

dations of Japanese foreign poliq: Emphasis on 

the post-World War II period and the search for 

global role. {S} 4 credits 

Dennis Yasutomo 

Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

252 International Organizations 

An examination of the role of international orga • 
zations in shaping the conduct of world politics 



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247 



■sue areas such as peace and security; economic 
wvelopment, and human rights. The course fo- 
(Jises on intergovernmental organizations such as 
le United Nations and the World Trade Organiza- 
fcn, treaty- based regimes such as the nuclear 
fcn-proliferation regime, and nongovernmental 
rganizations such as Amnesty International. Pre- 
iquisite: 241 or permission of the instructor. {S} 
Icredits 

mada Bukovansky 
ffered Fall 2002, Spring 2004 

A 54 Politics of the Global Environment 
I i introductory survey of the environmental impli- 
Ations of the international political economy. The 
slcus is on the changing role of the state and the 
)litics of industrial development. Special empha- 
s is devoted to the controversies and issues that 
I ive emerged since the 1950s, including the trag- 
ity of the commons, sustainable development, 
i obal warming, and environmental security. Spe- 
|al attention is also accorded to North-South rela- 
l)ns and the politics of indigenous peoples. Pre- 
j quisite: 241 or permission of the instructor. {S} 
i* credits 
Ijregory White 
ffered Spring 2004 

i 55 Colloquium: The Politics of International 
>urism 

: >urism has become the world's largest industry, 
* "ossing almost 4 trillion dollars annually. Interna- 
i; onal travel makes up an increasing portion of 
is-iis business, with almost 700 million tourists 
he taveling abroad in 2000. Because the activity 
ings hosts and guests together, the result is not 
lly an economic transaction, but also a political 
id social one. This colloquium examines how 
obal travel intersects many issues central to the 
udy of international politics, including security, 
i alitical economy, the environment, development, 
id gender. Enrollment limited to 20. (E) {S} 
credits 

ichael Clancy 
ffered Fall 2002 

56 Colloquium: International Migration 

his interdisciplinary seminar examines the poli- 
| cs of labor migration within the context of global- 
j ation. It begins with an examination of the glo- 



balization literature. It then turns to immigration 
specifically. Although we will discuss a wide array 
of cases and examples, the seminar focuses on 
case studies from three geographical areas: The 
Mediterranean basin, the Persian Gulf, and North 
America. Materials employed in the course will 
include social science analyses, as well as ethno- 
graphic descriptions, documentary and feature- 
length films, and migrants' diaries. The emphasis 
of the seminar will be on each student's comple- 
tion of a 30-page research paper. {S} 4 credits 
Gregory 1 White 
Offered Fall 2003 

257 Colloquium: The United Nations and 
Peacekeeping 

This colloquium addresses the question of peace- 
keeping as broadly defined. Central themes in- 
clude the debates about sovereignty and interven- 
tion, as well as peace and justice, which are out- 
lined in the UN Secretary-General's "Millenium 
Report." The course will examine both thematic 
issues and selected case studies related to tradi- 
tional peacekeeping, "second generation" multidi- 
mensional peace operations, preventive diplo- 
macy, peace enforcement and humanitarian inter- 
vention. The Colloquium will also explore the role 
of related regional organizations in peacekeeping, 
and the question of self-help in the new millen- 
nium. Prerequisite: GOV 241, suggested 252 or 
permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 
20. {S} 4 credits 
Tandeka Nkiwane 
Offered Spring 2003 

341 Seminar in International Politics 

Topic: United States Foreign Policy: Democracy 
and Human Rights 

Is the United States committed to promoting de- 
mocracy and human rights abroad or just advanc- 
ing its own strategic and domestic corporate inter- 
ests? What influence does the United States have on 
the developmentof democracy around the world 
and the emergence of — and compliance with — 
international human rights conventions, protocols 
and laws? This seminar begins with a historical 
overview of American democracy and human 
rights rhetoric and policies and seeks to uncover 
the range of political, economic, cultural and geo- 
strategic motivations underlying U.S. behavior. 



248 



Governme 



We will then examine American foreign policy 
responses to contemporary human rights and de- 
mocracy issues as they relate to women, regional 
and civil violence, state-sponsored violence and 
repression, development, globalization, and envi- 
ronmental degradation and resource scarcity. 
Throughout the semester we will examine how 
these policies have influenced events in Latin 
America, East Asia, Eastern Europe, and sub-Sa- 
haran and southern Africa. Previous course work 
relating to international relations, American poli- 
tics or foreign policy, or political theory required. 
Instructor's consent required. {S} 4 credits 
Jon Western 
Offered Fall 2002 

344 Seminar on Foreign Policy of the 
Chinese People's Republic 

Topic: The Cross-Strait Controversy 
Taiwan, the United States and the People's Repub- 
lic of China. An examination of the post-war devel- 
opment of Taiwan with emphasis on the impact of 
that development upon relations with the People's 
Republic of China and the United States. {S} 
4 credits 

Steven Goldstein 
Offered Spring 2003 

345 Seminar in International Politics 

Topic: South Africa in the Globalized Context 
This course examines contemporary South African 
politics, and South Africa's role in the regional, 
continental and international spheres. Special 
reference is paid to the evolving role of the South- 
ern African Development Community (SADC) as a 
force for regional economic and political integra- 
tion. Major themes of the course include the chal- 
lenges of nation-building in the post-apartheid era, 
and the problems associated with uneven develop- 
ment. {S} 4 credits 
Tandeka Nkiwane 
Offered Fall 2004 

346 Seminar in International Relations 

Regionalism and the International System 
This seminar offers students an opportunity to 
explore the revived debate on regionalism versus 
multilateralism. What are the institutional features 
of regional organizations, particularly in relation 



to the United Nations (UN)? Are regional organiz; 
tions stumbling blocks or stepping stones in the 
process of globalization? Will economic integra- 
tion lead to a convergence or increased inequalil 
between concerned states? Case studies will be 
drawn mainly from the developing world, includ- 
ing Africa, Latin America and South-East Asia. {S; 
4 credits 

Tandeka Nkiwane 
Offered Fall 2003 

Contemporary International Conflict: Causes, 
Characteristics, Prevention 
An assessment of the causes and characteristics < 
armed conflict in the contemporary world. We w 
examine a wide variety of conflict types, includin 
regional conflict, ethnic and internal conflict, re- 
source and environmental conflict. The course 
will use theory and cases to identify and analyze 
the principal causes of these various conflict type 
and to map out their distinctive characteristics. 
Special problems of contemporary conflict, such 
as failed states, the trade in weapons, the use of 
child soldiers, etc. will be examined. Students wi 
be expected to track a particular conflict (or cor 
flict type) throughout the semester and to write a 
final paper on the origins and status of this confl 
(or conflict type) and on possible routes to its 
control and termination. Enrollment limited to 2i 
{S} 4 credits 
Michael Clancy 
Offered Spring 2003 

347 Seminar in International Politics and 
Comparative Politics 

Topic: Algeria in the International System 
This seminar examines the history and political 
economy of Algeria, focussing on the tragic con-i 
flict in the 1990s. It sets Algeria's domestic politii 
in the broader context of its regional situation 
within North Africa, the Mediterranean, and Eu- 
rope. Study is devoted to Algeria's: 1) war of indi 
pendence from France; 2) colonial legacy; 3) or 
based economy; and 4) post-colonial politics an 
society. Special attention will be devoted to the i ! 
politics of Islam and the "permanent transition" 
to democracy. {S} 4 credits 
Gregory White 
Offered Spring 2004 



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249 



18 Seminar in International Politics 
fpic Conflict and Cooperation in Asia 

ie seminar will identify and analyze the sources 
id patterns of conflict and cooperation among 
. ian states and between Asian and Western coun- 
es in the contemporary period. The course will 
include by evaluating prospects for current ef- 
rts to create a new "Asia Pacific Community." 
•rmission of the instructor is required. {S} 
jcredits 

mnis Yasutomo 
: fered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

19 Seminar in International Relations and 
>mparative Politics 

pic: The Political Economy of the Newly 

dustrializing Countries of Asia 

i examination of the post-war development of 

)ng Kong, South Korea, Singapore and Taiwan. 

k} 4 credits 

wen Goldstein 

fered Spring 2004 

52 Seminar in Comparative Government and 
ternational Relations 

>pic: European Integration 

hat factors account for the character and timing 

the process of European integration? How has 

iropean integration influenced national identities 

id domestic politics within the states of the Euro- 

?an Union, and relations between the EU and 

her states? Are the institutions of the European 

lion democratic and accountable to all citizens? 

here should the boundaries of the EU be drawn? 

lis seminar will address these issues by exarnin- 

g the political economy of European integration. 

»} 4 credits 

lada Bukovansky 

ffered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

AS 375 Seminar: Japan-United States 

elations 

5} 4 credits 

£nnis Yasutomo 

ffered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 



Political Theory 



261 Ancient and Medieval Political Theory 

An examination of the classical polis and the 
Christian commonwealth as alternatives to the 
nation-state of the modern world. Topics consid- 
ered include: the moral effects of war and faction, 
the meaning of justice, citizenship, and natural 
law, the relation of politics and philosophy, and 
the contest between secular and sacred authority. 
Readings from Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine. 
Aquinas, and Marsilius. Emphasis on the ancients. 
{S} 4 credits 
Patrick Coby 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

262 Early Modern Political Theory, 
1500-1800 

An analytical and critical consideration of major 
theorists and concepts beginning with Machiavelli, 
including such topics as political power and politi- 
cal right; the principle and the problems of popu- 
lar sovereignty; the philosophical justification of 
liberty and equality; revolutionary republicanism, 
conservatism, and the question of people's capac- 
ity to create and control political systems. {S} 
4 credits 
Patrick Coby 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

263 Political Theory of the 19th Century 

A study of the major liberal and radical political 

theories of the 19th century, with emphasis on 

the writings of Hegel, Marx, Tocqueville, Mill 

and Nietsche. Not open to first-year students. {S} 

4 credits 

Gary Lehring 

Offered Spring 2003, Fall 2003 

264 American Political Thought 

An examination of political thought in America 
from the colonial period to the present. Prominent 
themes include: politics and religion, constitu- 
tional structures, political parties, slavery, industri- 
alization, welfare, foreign policy, and liberalism- 
conservatism. {S} 4 credits 
Patrick Coby 
Offered Spring 2003 



250 



Governme 



267 Problems in Democratic Thought 

What is democracy? We begin with readings of 
Aristotle, Rousseau, and Mill to introduce some 
issues associated with the ideal of democratic self- 
government: participation, equality, majority rule 
vs. minority rights, the common good, pluralism, 
community. Readings will include selections from 
liberal, radical, socialist, libertarian, multi- 
culturalist an feminist political thought. Not 
open to first-year students. {S} 4 credits 
Martha Ackelsberg 
Offered Fall 2004 

269 Politics of Gender and Sexuality 

An examination of gender and sexuality as subjects 
of theoretical investigation, historically con- 
structed in ways that have made possible various 
forms of regulation and scrutiny today. We will 
focus on the way in which traditional views of gen- 
der and sexuality still resonate with us in the mod- 
ern world, helping to shape legislation and public 
opinion, creating substantial barriers to cultural 
and political change. {S} 4 credits 
Gary Lehring 
Offered Fall 2002 

362 Seminar in Political Theory 

{S} 4 credits 

Revolution to Consolidation 
A look at how American political thinkers and 
activists justified a war for independence, puzzled 
through the construction of a new political order, 
thought about creating a democratic nation state, 
and argued over issues such as individual rights, 
the role of political parties, and the capabilities of 
citizens for self-government. We will look at spe- 
cific debates between 1776 and 1800 and also an 
overview of the most important contributors: 
Jefferson, Madison, Hamilton, and John Adams. 
Prerequisite: Some previous course on American 
government or permission of the instructor. 
Marc Lendler 
Offered Spring 2004 

364 Seminar in Political Theory 

Topic Feminist Theory 

An examination of feminism as a force in politics, 
with special attention to contestation over the 
meaning of feminism among feminist thinkers 



and in the broader public. Readings from Mary 
Wollstonecraft to Katha Pollitt. Prerequsites:. Pre 
\ious coursework in political theory or Women's 
Studies. {S} 4 credits 
To be announced 
To be arranged 

366 Seminar in Political Theory 

Topic: The Political Theory of Michel Foucault 
This course will examine the work of Michel Foi 
cault (1926-84), French philosopher, social 
critic, historian, and activist, and generally ac- 
knowledged as one of the most influential of the 
thinkers whose work is categorized as post-stru( 
turalist. Foucault's various inquiries into the pro 
duction of knowledge and power have formed th 
paradoxically destabilizing foundation for much 
the work on the status of the human subject in 
post-modernity. We will explore the theoretically 
rich and dense approaches undertaken by Fou- 
cault, as well as illuminating his central ideas th; 
seem to challenge much of what political theory 
accepts as a given. From The Birth of the Clinic 
The Order of Things, and Discipline and Pun is 
to his later works including The History ofSexu 
ality The Use of Pleasure, and The Care of the 
S^f attention will be given to how his works si- 
multaneously advance and critique much of the 
canon of political theory. Prerequisite: Complete 
of Gov 100 and one other upper division politic? 
theory course or permission of the instructor. {S 
4 credits 
Gary Lehring 
Offered Fall 2004 

367 Seminar in Political Theory 

Queer Theory 
This course introduces students to the emerging 
interdisciplinary field of queer theory. This is of i 
a perplexing task as there is no real consensus 
the definitional limits of queer. Indeed, many 
scholars believe the inability to define these lim 
is one of queer theory's greatest strengths. 
"Queer" can function as a noun, an adjective o: 
verb, but in each case it is defined against the 'if 
mal' or normalizing. Queer theory is not a sing u 
or systematic conceptual or methodological 
framework. Rather it is a collection of intellecti I 
engagements with the relations between sex, ge 



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251 



I and sexual desire. As such, it is hard to call 
teer theory a school of thought, as it has a very 
[orthodox and often disrespectful view of "disci- 
ne." Queer theory, then, describes a diverse 
ige of critical practices and priorities: analyses 
same-sex sexual desire in literary texts, film or 
iisic; exploration of the social and political 

wer relations of sexuality; critiques of the sex- 

Ider system; studies of transgender identifica- 

n, or sadomasochism and of transgressive de- 

e. {S} 4 credits 

ty Lebring 

fered Spring 2003 

4 Special Studies 

mission for majors by permission of the depart- 

^nt. 4 credits 

fered both semesters each year 

8d Special Studies 

mission for majors by permission of the depart- 
•nt. 8 credits 

II year course; Offered each year 



he Major 



Ivlsers: Martha Ackelsberg, Donald Baumer, 
ada Bukovansky, Patrick Coby, Donna Robinson 
vine, Velma Garcia, Howard Gold, Steven 
■ldstein, Alice Hearst. Gary Lehring, Marc 
ndler. Tandeka Xkiwane, Donald Robinson, 
egory White, Dennis Yasutomo. 

Iviser for Study Abroad: To be announced. 

elaw Adviser: Alice Hearst. 

aduate School Adviser: To be announced. 

rector of the Jean Picker Semester-in- 
ashington Program: Donald Baumer. 

usis: 100. 

'quirements: 10 semester courses, including the 

Uowing: 
100; 

one course at the 200 level in each of the fol- 
lowing fields: American government, compara- 



tive government, international relations, and 
political theory; 

3. two additional courses, one of which must be a 
seminar, and both of which must be related to 
one of the courses taken under (2); they may 
be in the same sub-field of the department, or 
they may be in other sub-fields, in which case a 
rationale for their choice must be accepted by 
the student and her adviser; and 

4. three additional elective courses. Majors are 
encouraged to select 190 as one of their elec- 
tives. 

Majors may spend the junior year abroad if they 
meet the college requirements. 



The Minor 



Advisers: Same as those listed for the major. 

Based on 100. The minor consists of 6 courses, 
which shall include 5 additional courses, includ- 
ing at least one course from two of the four fields 
identified as requirements for the major. 

Honors 

Director: Patrick Coby. 

Students are eligible for the Honors Program who 
have at least a 3-3 GPA in courses in their major. 
Eligible students are encouraged to apply in the 
Spring of their junior year, but Fall applications 
are allowable so long as they are received before 
the end of the first week of classes in September. 
January graduates are on a different schedule. 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Requirements: 

1. Students in Honors must fulfill the general 
requirements for the major, that is, 10 courses 
of which -i30d Thesis counts for two electives. 

2. The core of the program is a thesis paper, a 
complete draft of which is due on the first day 
of the second semester. Students will spend the 
Spring semester revising their papers and will 
submit the final version by April 1 . 



252 



Governme 



3. Following submission of the final paper, stu- 
dents will take an oral examination based on 
the thesis and on the field in which it was writ- 
ten. The field is defined by the student herself, 
who at the time of the exam will identify three 
courses which she believes bear upon the topic 
of her thesis. The choice of these courses 
should be made with a view to the wider con- 
cerns of political science. 

431 Thesis 

8 credits 

Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

Requirements: 

Requirements for honors for students in 431 will 
be the same as for those taking 430d, except that 
the final thesis will be due on the first day of 
classes of the second semester. Students must ap- 
ply for admission to 431 in the preceding spring 
semester. 

Jean Picker Semester-in- 
Washington Program 

The Jean Picker Semester-in-Washington Program 
is a first-semester program open to Smith junior 
and senior government majors and to other Smith 
juniors and seniors with appropriate background 
in the social sciences. It provides students with an 
opportunity to study processes by which public 
policy is made and implemented at the national 
level. Students are normally resident in Washing- 
ton from the June preceding the semester through 
December. 

Applications for enrollment should be made 
through the director of the Semester-in-Washing- 
ton Program no later than November 1 of the pre- 
ceding year. Enrollment is limited to 12 students, 
and the program is not mounted for fewer than 
six. 

Before beginning the semester in Washington, 
the student must have satisfactorily completed at 
least one course in American national government 
at the 200 level selected from the following 
courses: 200, 201, 202, 206, 207, 208, and 209- 
In addition, a successful applicant must show 
promise of capacity for independent work. An 



applicant must have an excess of four credits on 
her record preceding the semester in Washingtoi 

For satisfactory completion of the Semester-ir 
Washington Program, 14 credits are granted: fou 
credits for a seminar in policymaking (41 1); 2 
credits for GOV 413, seminar on political science 
research; and 8 credits for an independent re- 
search project (412), culminating in a long papc 

No student may write an honors thesis in the 
same field in which she has written her long papi 
in the Washington seminar, unless the departmer 
upon petition, grants a specific exemption from 
this policy. 

The program is directed by a member of the 
Smith College faculty, who is responsible for se- 
lecting the interns and assisting them in obtainin 
placement in appropriate offices in Washington, 
and directing the independent research project 
through tutorial sessions. The seminar is con- 
ducted by an adjunct professor resident in Wash 
ington. 

Students participating in the program pay ful 
tuition for the semester. They do not pay any fee^ 
for residence at the college, but are required to 
pay for their own room and board in Washingtoi 
during the fall semester. 



253 



History 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



ofessors 

an Afferica, Ph.D. 
**- Lester K. Little, Ph.D. 
1 Howard Nenner, LL.B., Ph.D. 
achim W. Stieber, Ph.D., Chair 
Neal Salisbury, Ph.D 
Daniel K. Gardner, Ph.D. 
David Newbury, Ph.D. (History and African 
Studies) 



Visiting Assistant Professor 

Jennifer Hall-Witt, Ph.D. 
Rama Mantena, Ph.D. 

Associated Faculty 

Daniel Horowitz, Ph.D. (American Studies and 

History) 
Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz, Ph.D. (American 

Studies and History) 



ssociate Professors 

Ann Zulawski, Ph.D. (History and Latin 
American Studies) 
1 Ernest Benz, Ph.D. 
Richard Lim, Ph.D. 

siting Associate Professor 

ederick McGinness, Ph.D. 

»sistant Professors 

'Robert A. Eskildsen, Ph.D. 
Fiona Griffiths, Ph.D. 
nothy D. Carmichael, Ph.D. 
ircy Buerkle, Ph.D. 



Instructor 

Patrick Shorb, M.A. 

Lecturers 

Kathleen Banks Nutter, Ph.D. 
Lowell Gudmundson, Ph.D. 
Marylynn Salmon, Ph.D. 
Kate Weigand, Ph.D. 
Christine Doyle Dee, A.M. 

Research Associates 

Alan Cottrell, Ph.D. 
Debbie Cottrell, Ph.D. 
Erika Laquer, Ph.D. 
Revan Schendler, Ph.D. 



story courses at the 100- and 200-level are open 
all students unless otherwise indicated. Students 
ntemplating a history major are strongly advised 
take HST 100 in their first or second year. Ad- 
ssion to seminars (300-level) assumes prior 
eparation in the field and is by permission of the 
tfructor. 

A reading knowledge of foreign languages is 
>hly desirable and is especially recommended 
r students planning a major in history. 

Cross-listed courses and seminars retain their 
me department or program designations. For 
E full description of such a course and the se- 
tters it will be offered, please see the home 
• partment or program listing. 



Basis 



100 Introduction to History 

Topic: The European Millennium, 1000-2000 
How did Europe, a cape of Asia, come to dominate 
much of the planet politically and culturally? The 
encounters of Vikings, Crusaders, conquistadors, 
missionaries, traders, soldiers, settlers, revolution- 
aries, and feminists with non-Europeans. How 
distinctive forms of family, state, church, economy, 
and community participated in and grew out of 
European imperialism. The formation of a global 
culture as the reconquest of Europe by the rest of 
the world. {H} 4 credits 



254 



Histoi 



Lecture and discussion 

Ernest Benz, (Director), Howard Nenner 

Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

Lectures and Colloquia 

Lectures (L) are unrestricted as to size. Colloquia 
(C) are primarily reading and discussion courses 
limited to 20. Lectures and colloquia are open to 
all students unless otherwise indicated. In certain 
cases, students may enroll in colloquia for semi- 
nar credit with permission of the instructor. 

Antiquity 

200 (L) Ancient Greece and Rome 

A survey of the political, social, and cultural his- 
tory of Greece from the Bronze Age to Alexander, 
and of Rome from the Tarquins to Constantine. 
The course examines the experience of these 
peoples, their art, philosophy, religion, and the 
interpretation of their own pasts; it examines their 
democratic and imperialist politics, the social 
dynamics of their clans and families, men and 
women, technology and trade. Special emphasis is 
given to the Greek city-state and the Roman repub- 
lic and their meaning in Western history. {H} 
4 credits 

Frederick McGinness 
Offered Fall 2002 

201 (L) The Silk Road 

The premodern contacts, imagined and real, be- 
tween East and West. Cultural, religious and tech- 
nological exchanges between China, India and 
Rome. The interactions between these sedentary 
societies and their nomadic neighbors. The rise 
and fall of nomadic empires such as that of the 
Mongols. Trade, exploration and conquest on the 
Eurasian continent. We will sample pertinent travel 
accounts as a form of ethnographical knowledge 
that reproduces notions of cultural identity and 
civilization. {H} 4 credits 
Richard Lim 
Offered Fall 2003 

202 (L) Ancient Greece 

The emergence of the Greek world from the Dark 
Age to Philip II of Macedon, c. 800-336 B.C.E., 
focusing on the politics, society, and culture of late 



archaic and classical Greece. Main topics include 
colonization, tyranny, hoplites and city-state soci- 
ety; the Persian Wars; Sparta and Athens; Athenia 
empire and democracy; the rise of Macedon. {H} 
4 credits 
Richard Lim 
Offered Fall 2003 

203 (L) Alexander the Great and the 
Hellenistic World 

Following Alexander of Macedon 's conquest of th 
Persian Empire, a Greek-speaking commonweal! 
stretched from the Mediterranean to India. This 
course examines this dynamic period of history I 
the coming of the Romans. Main topics include: 
Alexander and his legacy; Greek conquerors and 
native peoples in contact and conflict; kings, citic 
and experimentation with multi-ethnic society; 
unity and diversity in Hellenistic Egypt, Syria and 
Judea; new developments in science and religion 
{H} 4 credits 
Richard Lim 
Offered Spring 2004 

206 (C) Aspects of Ancient History 

{H} 4 credits 

Rhetoric and the City in the Ancient Greek 
World 

The development of public speech in Greek cul- 
ture and society. Techniques of persuasion for u< 
in law-courts, assemblies, and other settings. 
Sophists and rhetorical education. Sophists and 
philosophers. Political communication between 
elites and masses. Rhetoric, civic ideology 7 , and i 
rise of the classical Athenian democracy. The 
transformation of rhetoric in the Hellenistic and 
Roman periods. {H} 4 credits 
Frederick McGinness 
Offered Fall 2002 

Slaver)' in the Ancient World 
This colloquium examines forms of dependency 
the ancient Mediterranean world ranging from tl. 
debt-bondage of archaic communities, the chatt 
slavery 7 of classical Athens and Rome, to the erne 
gence of "serfdom" in late antiquity. Readings 
include primary texts such as literary; documen- 
tary and material sources and secondary schola 
interpretations of the roles slavery played in 



story 



255 



,cient Mediterranean society and economy. Pre- 

>us knowledge of Greek and Roman history and 

vilization helpful but not required. 

chard Li m 

fered Spring 2004 

lamic Middle East 

)9 Aspects of Middle Eastern History 

[)ic: Introduction to Islamic History 
is course introduces students to salient events, 
pvements, issues and beliefs in Islam's past and 
esent. We will selectively address various aspects 
Islam's religio-political, legal, intellectual, so- 
ld, economic and military history. Owing to re- 
nt world events, significant emphasis is placed 
. the 20th century. However, since developments 
d changes during the last century cannot be 
operly understood without a deeper historical 
rspecuve, background/contextual readings are 

emphasized. {H} 4 credits 
mothy Carmichael 

fered Fall 2002, Spring 2003 

imth Asia 

:.0(L) Modern India 

i introduction to the history of the Indian sub- 
i titinent from the nineteenth to the twentieth 
ptury. We will explore ways in which British 
ilonial intervention and domination transformed 
pi social, cultural and political institutions. In 

1 ilicular, the course will focus on social reform, 
itionalism, feminism, the partitioning of British 
Mia, as well as the ever-present theme of moder- 
iv and tradition that continues to shape our un- 
irstanding of the modern nation-states of India 
id Pakistan. {H/S} 4 credits 

< ma Mantena 
(fered Fall 2002 

•A (C) Topics in Social History 

fie: History of Gender and Sexuality in South 

.77 

is colloquium explores the history of the Indian 
> icontinent as seen from women's perspectives. 
1 ' will read writings by women from the ancient 
Iriod through to the present. These writings will 
Jige from classical Sanskrit, Prakrit, and Tamil 
letry, to devotional literature in the medieval 



period, to the emergence of modern forms of 
writing (the autobiography, the novel, poetry, etc.) 
in the period of British colonial rule. We will fo- 
cus on the diversity of women's experiences in a 
range of different social, cultural and religious 
contexts. Themes include sexuality, religiosity, 
marriage and alternatives to marriage, rights to 
education and employment. {H} 4 credits 
Rama Mantena 
Offered Spring 2003 

285 (C) Aspects of South Asian History 
{H} 4 credits 

Race and Nationalism in British India 
How did the concept of race in the nineteenth 
century become a central component of European 
imperialism, particularly as applied to the British 
rule of the Indian subcontinent? Why and how was 
race linked to ideas of nationhood? This collo- 
quium examines issues of race and nation in the 
context of British India, focusing on themes such 
as empire and race, empire and gender, empire 
"at home" and the aftermath of empire. Assign- 
ments will include a wide range of material, in- 
cluding novels and films. 
Rama Mantena 
Offered Fall 2002 

Gandhi: Experiments in Life, Truth, and 
Politics 

Gandhi authored the doctrine of non-violence, 
one of the most enduring political philosophies of 
our time, and influenced other social and political 
movements, notably Martin Luther King, Jr. and 
the Civil Rights movement in the United States. He 
also offered a powerful critique of "Western" mo- 
dernity. This course uses Gandhi as a test case to 
examine the historical roles of intellectuals in 
social movements. Some broader themes to ex- 
plore include the place of Utopian thought in po- 
litical and social movements and non-violence as 
a political philosophy, as well as specific themes 
pertaining to Gandhian thought such as his con- 
cepts oiSatyagraha (truth-force) and ahimsa 
(non-violence) . 
Rama Mantena 
Offered Spring 2003 



256 



Histc 



East Asia 

211 (L) The Emergence of China 

Chinese society and civilization from c. 1000 B.C. 
to A.D. "00. Topics include neolithic cultures of 
China, Bronze Age, formation of a Chinese state, 
Golden Age of Chinese philosophy, creation of a 
centralized empire, relations with non-Chinese, 
family structure, roles of women, and introduction 
of Buddhism. Open to first-year students. {H} 
4 credits 
Daniel Gardner 
Offered Fall 2002 

212 (L) China in Transformation, 
A.D. 700-1900 

Chinese society and civilization from the Tang dy- 
nast}- to the Taiping rebellion. Topics include dis- 
appearance of the hereditary aristocracy and rise 
of the scholar-official class, civil service examina- 
tion system, Xeo-Confucian orthodoxy, poetry and 
the arts, Mongol conquest, popular beliefs, 
women and the family, Manchus in China, domes- 
tic rebellion, and confrontation with the West. 
Open to first-year students. {H} 4 credits 
Daniel Gardner 
Offered Spring 2003 

213 (C) Aspects of East Asian History 

Topic: Korea and China Under the Japanese 
Empire. 1895-1945 

An examination of Japan s colonial empire from 
the viewpoint of the colonizers and the colonized. 
Topics will include daily life and the daily opera- 
tions of Empire; contending theories of Japanese 
colonization; colonization's effects on gender roles 
for both the colonizer and colonized; and the ef- 
fects colonization had on Chinese and Korean na- 
tionalism. The course will conclude with a discus- 
sion on the postwar legacy of Japanese Imperial- 
ism. Enrollment limited to 20. {H} 4 credits 
Patrick Shorb 
Offered Fall 2002 

218 (C) Thought and Art in China 

Topic Medieval Thought and Art 
A survey of medieval Chinese thought and its ex- 
pression in the visual arts during the Tang and 
Sung dynasties ("th-13th century). Open to first- 
year students by permission of the instructors only. 



{H/A} 4 credits 

Daniel Gardner Maty! in Rhie (Art and East 

Asian Studies) 

Offered Spring 2003 

220 (L) Japan from Ancient Times to the 
18th Century 

Japanese history from its prehistoric beginnings 
the Tokugavva period, focusing on politics, socie 
and culture. Topics include the origins of the Ja] 
nese people and the culture of Japan, continent* 
influence and indigenous development, samurai 
society, medieval governance, and the rise of the 
commoner class. {H} 4 credits 
Robert Eskildsen 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

221 (L) Modern Japan 

Japan from the Tokugavva period to its occupati< 
by the United States and the "economic miracle. 
Elite politics and political economy, the arrival c 
European imperialists, the Meiji Restoration. Jaj 
nese imperialism and war. cultural transformatii 
and conflict within Japanese society. {H} -i credi 
Patrick Shorb, Spring 2003 
Robert Eskildsen. Spring 200-i 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

222 (C) Aspects of Japanese History 

4 credits 

Tokugawa Society 

An inquiry into Japanese society during the 
Tokugavva period, from the turbulent formative 
years of the late 1500s to the challenges and coi 
flicts of the mid- 1800s. Topics include views of 
foreign world, samurai life, urban life, the aes- 
thetic of leisure, women's life, art, and Tokugaw' 
thought. {H/A} 
Robert Eskildsen 
Offered Fall 2002 

Meiji Restoration 
The revolutionary transformation of Japanese s< 
ety during the nineteenth century. Topics includ 
economic development and political strife; the 
foreign crisis at mid-century that unleashed a d 
stabilizing power struggle; civil war and the ere 
ation of a new political order; and the far-reach j 
changes to political, economic and social institi 



storv 



257 



ns during the second half of the century. {H} 
bert Eskildsen 
fered Fall 2003 

thinking the U.S. Occupation of Japan 
1 the history of contemporary Japan start in the 
ir 1945? To what extent did the U.S. occupation 
idamentally transform postwar Japan? The 
lirse will approach these questions by exploring 
ltinuity and change during the U.S. Occupation 
Japan following World War II. Topics will in- 
de the influence that Occupation had on Japa- 
;e politics, society, economics, culture, and 
,der roles. The course will also assess the 
acy of the Occupation's "benevolent rule" 
U.S.-Japan relations, Japanese war guilt and 
ban's ties to the rest of East Asia. {H} 
YrickShorb 
i ered Spring 2003 

L also HST 292. 

Iiirope 

24 (L) The Early Medieval World, 300-900 

[»m the rise of Christianity and the fall of Rome 
t he age of conversion. The monastic ideal and 
i cult of saints, the emergence of the papacy, the 
: inging roles of ritual and authority, kinship and 
\ gship. The course ends with Charlemagne, the 
[ olingian renaissance, literacy and learning, and 
t decline of the Carolingian empire and the Vi- 
tg invasions. {H} 4 credits 
f na Griffiths 
[ered Fall 2003 

k (L) The Making of the Medieval World, 
E 0-1350 

F>m the crowning of Charlemagne in 800 
t ough the High Middle Ages to the Black Death 
i 1348. Topics include cathedrals and universi- 
ty, struggles between popes and emperors, pil- 
gnage and popular religion, the Crusades and 
Msader kingdoms, heresy and the Inquisition, 
c valry and Arthurian romance, the expansion 
a 1 consolidation of Europe. {H} 4 credits 
' na Griffiths, Spring 2003 
her little, Spring 2004 
(ered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 



228 (C) Religious Women in Medieval 
Society 

Monasticism provided medieval women an oppor- 
tunity to pursue the religious life free from the 
obligations of marriage, motherhood and family. 
Topics include saints and martyrs, prophets and 
heretics, sexuality and virginity, literacy and educa- 
tion within the cloister, mysticism, relations be- 
tween religious women and men, and the rel- 
evance of gender in the religious life. Do medieval 
texts by and about religious women reveal a dis- 
tinctive feminine spirituality? {H} 4 credits 
Fiona Griffiths 
Offered Fall 2003 

See also HST 291. 

230 (L) Europe from 1300 to 1530 and the 
Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy 

Society, culture, and politics at the end of the 
Middle Ages. Topics include the Black Death, the 
papacy as an institution of government, the chal- 
lenge to papal authority by church councils, the 
Italian Renaissance, and the early voyages of dis- 
covery. Open to first-year students by permission 
of the instructor only. {H} 4 credits 
Joachim Stieber 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

231 (L) Early Modern Europe in the Age of 
the Reformation, 1460-1660 

European society on the eve of the Reformation; 
the humanist movement north of the Alps; religion 
and politics in the Protestant Reformation; Roman 
Catholic reform and the Counter-Reformation. 
Open to first-year students by permission of the 
instructor only. {H} 4 credits 
Joachim Stieber 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

234 (L) Tudor England 

The development of the early modern English 
state, from its 1 5th-century origins to the death of 
Elizabeth. Dynasticism, religious upheaval, and the 
place and power of English monarchs from Rich- 
ard III to James I. {H} 4 credits 
Howard Nenner 
Offered Fall 2003 



258 



Histo 



236 (C) Authority and Legitimacy in the Age 
of More and Shakespeare 

An examination of the texts and historical context 
of Shakespeare's Richard II I Henry IV Henry V, 
Richard III and Kinglear, Mores Utopia and The 
History of Richard III, and other significant works 
of the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries 
touching on the questions of order, authority; and 
legitimacy. Admission by permission of the instruc- 
tors. {L/H} 4 credits 

Howard Senner William Oram (English Lan- 
guage and Literature) 
Offered Fall 2002 

237 (C) A Social and Cultural History of 
Britain, 1800-1914 

The social and cultural history of Britain from 
1800 to beginning of WWI. By examining primary 
sources drawn from literature (novels, poetry, and 
non-fiction) and the arts (painting, architecture, 
opera, political cartoons, melodrama, and bal- 
lads) . the course will examine what Britons 
learned about their society- through reading and 
attendance at cultural venues such as taverns, mu- 
seums, theatres, music halls, and exhibitions. The 
course will also address representations of class, 
gender, race, and religion, national and imperial 
identities, urban and provincial cultures, and in- 
fluences on British culture from the Continent and 
Britain's overseas colonies. {H} 4 credits 
Jennifer Hall-Witt 
Offered Spring 2003 

239 (L) Emergence and Development of 
Russian State and Society from Kievan Rus 
to the Napoleonic Wars 

The political, social, and cultural roots of Russian 
institutions; foreign influences on the structure of 
Russian society and polity; evolution of autocracy 
and the bureaucratic state. {H} 4 credits 
Joan Afferica 
Offered Fall 2002 

241] The Moscow Kremlin 

An on-site study of the Moscow Kremlin with em- 
phasis on the uses of public space, the nature and 
ritual of rulership, the Orthodox Church and its 
relation to the Tsardom, and the expression of 
world view and power relations in the frescoes, 



stones, and artifacts of Kremlin churches, palace 

and museums. Prerequisite: 239 and permission 

of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 10. (E) {I 

2 credits 

Joan Afferica 

Offered Interterm 2003 

243 (C) Reconstructing Historical 
Communities 

How much can historians learn about the daily 
lives of the mass of the population in the past? G 
a people's history recapture the thoughts and 
deeds of subjects as well as rulers? Critical exam 
nation of attempts at total history from below foi 
selected English and French iocales. The class 
recreates families, congregations, guilds, and fa< 
tions in a German town amid the religious contr 
versy and political revolution of the 1840s. {H/J 
4 credits 
Ernest Benz 
Offered Spring 2004 

245 (C) The Middle Ages and the 
Renaissance in European Thought, 
1750-1870 

The images of the Middle Ages and of the Renai; 
sance in England, Germany, and France both be 
fore and after the French Revolution. The Gothk 
Revival as a reaction against classicism in arts a 
letters, against the political and social values of I 
French Revolution as well as against industrial 
modernization and economic liberalism. An epr 
logue will briefly survey the Gothic Revival in th> 
United States (c. 183(M930). {L/H} 4 credits I 
Joachim Stieber 
Offered Fall 2003 

246 (C) Representing the Past 

Topic: Memory. Monuments and Memorials 
Contemporary debates among European histori 
ans, artists and citizens over the public com- 
memoration of political history. The effectivene 
of art and architecture as tributes to the past, a? 
markers of history, and as creators of meaning. 
Can it be more dangerous to remember history 
than to forget it? {H} 4 credits 
Darcy Buerkle 
Offered Fall 2002 



Jtorv 



259 



tf (C) The Rise and Collapse of the 
isslan and Soviet Empires 

rmation of the Great Russian and Soviet Ern- 
es; theory 7 and practice of government policy 
vard minority populations; political, economic, 
i i cultural relations among constituent peoples 
!the 19th and 20th centuries. {H} 4 credits 

ImAjferica 
fered Fall 2002 



252 (L) Women in Modern Europe, 
1789-1918 

A survey of European women's experiences from 
the French Revolution through World War I. 
Women's changing social, economic, cultural and 
political roles as revealed in biographies, novels, 
films, treatises, and memoirs. {H} 4 credits 
Darcy Buerkle 
Offered Fall 2002 



; 8 (C) The French Revolution 

e causes, participants, major events, consc- 
iences and interpretations of the French Revolu- 

■ political writings, popular literature, songs, 
(ers, and propaganda; analyses of revolution 

■ counter-revolution; gender and politics; dis- 
Mrse and festival; historiography and popular 
presentations. {H} 4 credits 

f 'derick McGinness 
[fered Spring 2003 

I -ton 249, 250, and 251 constitute a sequence 
[modern European history. 

[9 (L) Early Modern Europe 1618-1815 

{ } 4 credits 
i be announced 
I fered Spring 2004 

• (L) Europe in the Nineteenth Century 

115-1914: a century of fundamental change 
i hout a general war. The international order 
tablished at the Congress of Vienna and its chal- 
l gers: liberalism, nationalism, Romanticism, 
sialism, secularism, capitalism, and imperial- 
ii. {H} 4 credits 
/ test Benz 
(fered Fall 2003 

• 1 (L) Europe in the Twentieth Century 

1'ological and military rivalries of the contempo- 

iy era. Special attention to the origin, character, 

n outcome of the two World Wars and to the 

oerience of Fascism, Nazism, and Communism. 

4 credits 

hestBenz 

•fered Spring 2004 



253 (L) Women in Contemporary Europe 

A survey of European women's experiences during 
the twentieth century. Topics include the changing 
meanings of gender, work, women's relationship 
to the State, motherhood and marriage, shifting 
population patterns, and the expression and regu- 
lation of sexuality. Sources include novels, films, 
treatises, and memoirs. {H} 4 credits 
Darcy Buerkle 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

254 (C) 19th-century European Thought 

Rethinking individual and community 7 in the wake 
of the French and industrial revolutions. Readings 
from de Maistre, Saint-Simon, Comte, Durkheim, 
Fourier, Schopenhauer, Burckhardt, Nietzsche, 
Marx, and Mill. Also considered are their views on 
art, religion, science, and women. {H/S} 4 credits 
Ernest Benz 
Offered Fall 2002 

255 (C) 20th-century European Thought 

Topic: History of the Self 

The history of psychoanalysis. {H/S} 4 credits 

Darcy Buerkle 

Offered Spring 2004 

Africa 

256 (L) Introduction to West African History 

The political, economic, cultural, religious and 
colonial histories of Africa west of Lake Chad and 
south of the Sahara desert, a region nearly as large 
as all of the continental U.S. Draws on articles, 
films, biographies, novels, and plays, and explores 
broad cultural continuities, regional diversity; and 
historical change, from 1000 AD to the present. 
Topics include: the Sudanic Empires; Slavery and 
the Atlantic Slave Trade; Islam African Initiatives 
under Colonial Rule; and Post-Colonial Problems 



260 



Histo 



in West Africa. {H/S} 4 credits 
David Newbury 
Offered Spring 2003 

257 (L) East Africa in the 19th and 20th 
Centuries 

A comparative introduction to the peoples of 
Tanzaia, Uganda, and Kenya, and surrounding 
areas. Topics include: the dynamics of pre-colo- 
nial cultures, ecologies and polities; the effects of 
the Indian Ocean slave trade; changing forms of 
Imperialism; local forms of resistance and accom- 
modation to imperial power; nationalist struggles 
and decolonization; post-colonial crises and 
present challenges. {H/S} 4 credits 
David Newbury 
Offered Fall 2003 

258 (L) History of Central Africa 

Focusing on the former Belgian colonies of Congo, 
Rwanda, and Burundi from the late 1800s, this 
course seeks to explore, and then transcend, the 
powerful myths that adhere to this area of the 
world, the setting for Joseph Conrad's "Heart of 
Darkness." Topics include: precolonial cultural 
diversities; economic extraction in the Congo Free 
State; The colonial encounter and colonial experi- 
ences; decolonization and the struggles over defin- 
ing the state; and postcolonial catastrophes. 
{H/S} 4 credits 
David Newbury 
Offered Spring 2004 

259 (C) Aspects of African History 

4 credits 

Violence in Northeast African Hist or) 1 
This course explores political violence in the Horn 
of Africa over the last 150 years. We will consider 
religion, nationalism, decolonization, post-colo- 
nial governance, diverse ethno-linguistic identities, 
various forms of economic organization, external 
political and military aggression, and the Horn's 
widely varied physical environments. Did the rela- 
tionships between these factors, encourage or 
mitigate violent confrontations? Are these discern- 
ible patterns in the relationships that help to ex- 
plain the region's extensive political violence over 
the last century and a half? {H} 
Timothy Carmichael 
Offered Fall 2002 



Islam in Africa or African Islam? 
This course adopts a regional approach to explo 
ing the histories of Islam in sub-Saharan Africa, 
which was the first region to which Islam spread 
outside of Arabia. We will look at West Africa, 
Southern Africa, East Africa and Northeast Africa 
What source materials (and languages) have bee 
employed by scholars working in the different 
regions? What themes have dominated scholarly 
inquiry? We will also grapple with the vexing pro 
lem of whether we are dealing with "Islam in Af- 
rica" or "African Islam." {H} 
Timothy Carmichael 
Offered Spring 2003 

Christianity in Africa 

{H} 

David Newbury 

Offered Spring 2004 

See also HST 295 and HST 299- 

AAS 258 20th-century Africa 

AAS 370 Modern South Africa 

Latin America 

260 (L) Colonial Latin America, 1492-1823 

Iberian invasions in the 16th century to the mov< 
ments for independence in the early 1800s. The 
course emphasizes the effects of Spanish and Po 
tuguese colonial rule on the native societies of th 
Americas. {H} 4 credits 
Ann Zulawski 
Offered Fall 2002 

261 (L) National Latin America, 1821 to th 
Present 

A thematic survey of Latin American history in th 
19th and 20th centuries focusing on the develop 
ment of export economies and the consolidatior 
of the state in the 19th century, the growth of po 
litical participation by the masses after 1900, an 
the efforts of Latin Americans in the second half 
the 20th century to bring social justice and de- 
mocracy to the region. {H} 4 credits 
Ann Zulawski 
Offered Spring 2003 



ton 



261 



3 (C) Continuity and Change in Spanish 
lierica and Brazil 

Ural \nierica: Reform, Reaction, Revolution. 
>lores the diverse experiences of Central Ameri- 
j nations and peoples since the mid- 19th cen- 
k From a common basis in export agriculture, 
rial and political alternatives have emerged 
iiging from social democracy, to recurrent mili- 
L rule and neo-fascist regimes, to revolutionary 
ialism. Likewise, dramatically different ethnic 
ntities and conflicts have emerged in various 
jjons. The colloquium investigates two domi- 
U interpretive frameworks: class formation and 
i .licit}- as the bases for the patterns of political 
! lusion or inclusion. {H/S} 4 credits 
veil Gudmundson 
ered Fall 2002 

i 301 See also Seminars. 

rited States 

ton - 265, 266, and 267 constitute a sequence 
'nited States history. 

5 (L) North America in an Age of Empires 
i Revolutions, 1400-1800 

1 introduction to the social, political, and cul- 
ad history of the peoples of North America dur- 
the eras of colonization and the American 
rotation. {H} ^ credits 
m Salisbury 
ered Spring 2003 

16 (L) The Age of the American Civil War 

'. gins, course and consequences of the war of 
IS 1-65. Major topics include the politics and 
:>erience of slavery; religion and abolitionism; 
ologies of race; the role of .African Americans in 
ling slavery; the making of Union and Confeder- 
I myths; Reconstruction; white Americans' final 
; indonment of the cause of the freed people in 
1880s and 1890s. {H} 4 credits 
ristine Dee 
: : ered Fall 2002 

|7(L) The United States since 1890 

1? rise of industrial America, consumer culture, 
I lical and conservative political movements, mi- 
gration and diversification of the population, 



development of the social welfare state, the United 
States as a world power, and new modes of cul- 
tural expression. {H} 4 credits 
Kate Weigand 
Offered Spring 2003 

268 (L) Native American Indians, 
1400-Present 

An introduction to the economic, political, and 
cultural lustory of Native Americans and their rela- 
tions with non-Indians. {H} 4 credits 
Seal Salisbury 
Offered Fall 2002 

270 (C) Aspects of American History 

4 credits 

Riots, Railroads, Markets and Mobs: 
Transforming the American Republic, 
1815-1848 

This course will examine an era of remarkable 
change in American history. Within a single gen- 
eration, the country embarked on a dramatically 
new course of development. Democratic political 
culture evolved, industrialization transformed 
work in American society, and the market 
economy profoundly altered society. In the pro- 
cess, Americans reassessed institutions of family, 
religion, and culture. They redefined American 
values. Course readings and discussions will make 
use of primary sources as well as recent scholar- 
ship to examine the political, economic, social, 
and intellectual developments of the era that 
formed the basis of modern society. {H} 
Christine Dee 
Offered Fall 2002 

The American West to 1900 
The history of North America west of the Missis- 
sippi as a region in its own right rather than as an 
eventual appendage of the United States. Emphasis 
on the cross-cultural and cross-political currents 
that swept the West prior to the 20th century, and 
on new social relations and new identities forged 
from the crucibles of war, migration, and inequal- 
ity. Special attention to questions of race, ethnicity, 
and gender as they played out in the West, and to 
arguments about the meanings of the West and 
'the frontier" in U.S. history. {H} -4 credits 
Seal Salisbury 
Offered Spring 2003 



262 



Histc 



273 (L) Contemporary America 

The United States' rise to global power since 1945, 

the Cold War, McCarthyism, the political upheaval 

of the 1960s, and the politics of scarcity. {H} 

4 credits 

Daniel Horowitz 

Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

277 (L) Women in the United States, 
Colonial Period to 1865 

The historical position of women within the society 
and culture. Problems include immigration and 
ethnicity, isolation and social organization, the 
legal status of women (property and other rights), 
religion and witchcraft, race and class, the Revolu- 
tion and the Civil War, women's work within the 
household, slavery, education, redefinition of 
motherhood, abolition and reform, emergence 
of women's rights and factory labor. Emphasis on 
social, cultural, and spatial aspects. Prerequisite: 
a pre-1865 history course. {L/H} 4 credits 
Marylynn Salmon 
Offered Spring 2003 

278 (L) Women in the United States, 1865 
to 1970 

Continued examination of the historical position of 
women within the society and culture. Problems 
include the implications of class, changing notions 
of sexuality, educational growth, feminism, Afri- 
can-American women in "freedom," wage-earning 
women, careers, radicalism, the sexual revolution, 
the impact of the world wars and depression, and 
feminism's second wave. Emphasis on social and 
cultural aspects. {L/H} 4 credits 
Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

280 (C) Problems of Inquiry 

Women and Work in 20th-century America. The 
history of work in its social and political context, 
1870s-present. Topics include women's work at 
home and in the paid labor force, labor move- 
ments, race and class, New Deal, public policies 
affecting women and men at work; labor and the 
global economy. {H/S} 4 credits 
Kathleen Banks Nutter 
Offered Spring 2003 



HST 284 and 285 See Section on South Asia fol- 
lowing HST 210. 

AAS 278 The '60s: A History of Afro-Ameri- 
cans in the United States from 1954 to 19 

AMS 302 Seminar: The Material Culture of 
New England, 1630-1860 

Colloquia in Comparative 
History 

291 (C) The Plague of Justinian and the 
Black Death 

Analysis of the two major outbreaks of the plagu 
in Europe, one at the start of the Middle Ages an 
one at the end, with attention to geographical ar 
chronological patterns of the spread of the dises 
and to effects on social relations, politics, religi< 
and the value of labor. Comparisons to other ep: 
demies in world history. Recommended back- 
ground: HST 224, 225, 226, or 230. {H} 4 cred 
Lester Little 
Offered Spring 2004 

292 (C) The 19th-century Crisis in East As 

Reactions in China, Korea, and Japan to politica 
diplomatic, and economic circumstances in Eas 
Asia during the 19th century as those countries 
confronted a common challenge posed by Euro 
pean imperialism. Topics include theories of di- 
plomacy and trade, rebellion, invasion, econom 
and cultural transformation, and the birth of Jaj 
nese expansionism. {H} 4 credits 
Robert Eskildsen 
Offered Spring 2004 

293 (C) Decolonization in Africa 

This course examines the complex histories of 
decolonization in Africa. We will first look at th< 
structures of colonial power and the writings ol 
early nationalists, including Blyden, Padmore, , 
Thuku, and Plaatje. To understand the crisis of 
imperialism after World War II, we will follow I 
decolonization on the Indian subcontinent. Five" 
case studies will then be examined from British 
French, and Belgian colonies in Africa: Algeria, 
Ghana, Kenya, the Congo, and Zimbabwe. We w 



itory 



265 



iclude by inquiring into the legacy of 
:olonization in Africa, and ask of its larger 
aning for today's world. {H/S} 
vid Newbury 

: ered Spring 2003 

9 (C) Ecology and History in Africa 
I human species as an outgrowth of nature and 
I transformer of the physical world. European 
i African outlooks on nature, and their confron- 
ons with the landscapes, climates, diseases, 
*a and fauna of Africa. Specific concerns in- 
|de conservation, population, epidemiology; 
sion, forestry, and violence, within the overall 
nework of African social history and the natu- 
j processes. {H/S} 4 credits 
md Newbury 
ered Fall 2003 



minars 

5 Early European History to 1300 
tic: Heloise: Scholar, Writer and Abbess 
[/women wrote in Latin during the twelfth cen- 
h however, the writings of Heloise (d. 1163), 
fress of the Paraclete, suggest that women could 
t! did receive a solid education. The letters 
\ ch passed between her and her former hus- 
> d, Peter Abelard (d. 1142) in the 1130s are 
i )ng the treasures of Western literature. Al- 
lugh Heloise was apparently known throughout 
'nee during her lifetime for her knowledge and 
r.llectual capabilities, until recently she has been 
A lied exclusively within the context of her rela- 
i ship to Abelard. This course seeks to present 
l as a subject in her own right and will provide 
i oadly based understanding of her life, includ- 
i her scholarship, spiritual quest and achieve- 
nts as an abbess. {H} ^ credits 
h* Griffiths 
)ared Spring 2004 

*3 Topics in British History 

I ic: To be announced. {H} 4 credits 

'-iiardNenner 

3sred Fall 2003 



346 Problems in European Intellectual 
History 

Topic: Trauma in History 
The treatment of trauma in psychiatric diagnosis 
and historical writing. Case-studies include the 
Holocaust and atrocities in the former Yugoslavia, 
along with selected comparisons to contemporary 
events worldwide. {H} 4 credits 
Darcy Buerkle 
Offered Spring 2003 

355 Topics in Social History 

Topic: Women 's History as a Field of Study 
{H/S} 4 credits 
Darcy Buerkle 
Offered Fall 2003 

358 Topics in African History 

Topic: Law and Power in African History 
Law and power in the history of colonial and post- 
colonial African societies. To reveal important 
"inner workings" of different societies, we will 
examine law and power using historical, anthro- 
pological, legal and sociological literature to focus 
on themes such as power, dominance, hegemony, 
resistance, generation, race, gender and class. 
Readings in legal theory and studies on property; 
dispute settlement, court litigation, legal pluralism, 
and language and gender issues. {H} 4 credits 
Tim Carmichael 
Offered Spring 2003 

LAS 301 Seminar: Topics in Latin American 
Studies 

Cuban Society 1898 to the Present 
This seminar examines social change in Cuba, 
particularly focusing on the period since the revo- 
lution of 1959- It will emphasize the economic 
and political history of modern Cuba as a basis for 
the discussion of various aspects of national life. 
Topics to be explored may include: Cuba's rela- 
tionship with the U.S., central planning and eco- 
nomic restructuring, race and ethnicity; social 
change and political pluralism; gender and sexual- 
ity; education; religion; art and architecture; 
healthcare and scientific development; music, 
dance, and film. {H/S} 
Ann Zulawski 
Offered Spring 2003 



264 



Histoi 



370 The American Revolution 

Topic: Social Change and the Birth of the United 

States, 1760-1800 

Relationships between the revolution, ideology, 

and social changes, with particular attention to 

questions of class, race, and gender. {H} 4 credits 

Neal Salisbury 

Offered Fall 2002 

372 Problems in American History 

Topic: American South in 19th Century 
From the invention of the cotton gin and the rise 
of the Cotton Kingdom to the passage oiPlessy v. 
Ferguson justifying racial segregation, this semi- 
nar examines the complicated past of the Ameri- 
can South during a century of radical transforma- 
tion. We will ask "what is the South?" and consider 
the influence of regionalism in American history. 
Topics will include southerners' revolutionary 
legacy; the creation of southern nationalism, the 
transition from slave to free labor, the rise of 
southern industry, and the relationships between 
regional identity and constructs of race, class and 
gender. {H} 4 credits 
Christine Dee 
Offered Fall 2002 

383 Research in U.S. Women's History: 
The Sophia Smith Collection 

Topic: American Women in the 19th and 20th 

Centuries 

{H} 4 credits 

Helen Horowitz 

Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

404 Special Studies 

By permission of the department. 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 

490 Teaching History 

Recent trends in historiography in the United 
States and in Europe. For United States history, the 
focus will be on the formation of a self-conscious 
American identity during the American Revolution 
and the period of the adoption of the Constitution 
and the early decades of the republic. For Euro- 
pean history, the focus will be on the interaction 
between the development of the European Com- 
munity and the study of common traditions in the 
European past. Topics to be considered will in- 



clude the complementary traditions of lordship 
and communal authority in the formation of con- 
stitutional government in Europe and the persis- 
tence of regional loyalties that competed with the 
formation of national identities and national state 
in the nineteenth century. 
Joachim Stieber, Spring 2003 
To be announced, Spring 2004 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 



The Major 



Advisers: Ernest Benz, Robert Eskildsen, Dani 
Gardner, Fiona Griffiths, Howard Nenner, Davie 
Newbury, Neal Salisbury, Joachim Stieber, Ann 
Zulawski. 

The history major comprises 1 1 semester cours 
at least six of which shall normally be taken at 
Smith, distributed as follows: 

1. Basis of the major: HST 100. 

2. Field of concentration: five semester course* 
the 200- or 300-level, at least one of which 
Smith history department seminar Two of 
these may be historically oriented courses ir 
other disciplines approved by the student's 
adviser. 

3. Additional courses: five 200- or 300-level 
courses, of which four must be in at least W 
fields distinct from the field of concentration 
Two of these five may be cross-listed course) 
the history department. 

4. Geographical breadth: at least one course a 
the 200- or 300- level in each of three of th< 
following six geographical regions. 
Africa 

East Asia and Central Asia 
Europe 
Latin America 
Middle East and South Asia 
North America 

Courses in the field of concentration and outsii 
the field of concentration may be used to satisl 
this requirement. AP credits may not be used t 
satisfy this requirement. 

Fields of concentration: Antiquity; Islamic 
Middle East; East Asia; Europe, 300-1650; Em* 



torv 



265 



50 to the present; Africa; Latin America; United 
.tes. 

Note: A student may also design a field of con- 
ization, which should consist of courses re- 
ed chronologically, geographically, method- 
ically or thematically (e.g., Britain, Compara- 
» Colonialism, Russian and Soviet history' and 
.ture, Women's History), and must be approved 
an adviser. 

The S/U grading option is not allowed for 
jrses counting toward the major. 
A student may count one (but only one) AP 
imination in history with a grade of 4 or 5 as 
equivalent of a course for 4 credits toward the 
jor. If the examination is in American history 
i the student's field of concentration is United 
tes, the course it replaces must be in the con- 
ization; otherwise, the course it replaces must 
tone of the additional courses. Similarly, if the 
Lmination is in European history, the student 
■ use it toward the concentration in Europe, 
>0 to the present; otherwise, the course it re- 
ces must be one of the additional courses. 



Honors 



udyAway 



tudent planning to study away from Smith dur- 
i the academic year or during the summer must 
iisult with a departmental adviser concerning 
es for granting credit toward the major or the 
t;ree. Students must consult with the departmen- 
.adviser for study away both before and after 
lir participation in Junior Year Abroad pro- 
ems. 

i/iser for Study Away: Europe, Joachim 

rber; 

i other destinations: Daniel Gardner. 



he Minor 



Risers: same as those listed for the major. 

i 1 minor comprises five semester courses, 
^east three of these courses must be related 
: onologically, geographically, methodologically, 
) hematically. Students should consult their 
Users. 



Director: Ann Zulawski. 

431 Thesis 

8 credits 

Offered Fall semester each year 

The honors program is a one-year program taken 
during the senior year. Students who plan to enter 
honors should present a thesis project, in consul- 
tation with an adviser, no later than preregistration 
week of the spring semester of their junior year. 
Students spending the junior year away should 
submit their proposal to the director of honors in 
the spring semester and must apply not later than 
the second day of classes of the fall semester of 
their senior year. 

The central feature of the history honors pro- 
gram is the writing of a senior thesis, which is due 
on the first day of the spring semester of the senior 
year. The preparation of the thesis counts for eight 
credits during the fall semester of the senior year. 
Each honors candidate defends her thesis in the 
week before spring recess at an oral examination 
in which she relates her thesis topic to a broader 
field of historical inquiry, defined with the ap- 
proval of the director of honors. 

The history honors major comprises 1 1 semester 
courses, at least six of which shall normally be 
taken at Smith, distributed as follows: 

1. Basis of the major: HST 100. 

2. Field of concentration: four semester courses 
at the 200- or 300-level, at least one of which 
is a Smith history department seminar. Two of 
these may be historically oriented courses in 
other disciplines, approved by the student's 
adviser. 

3. The thesis counting for two courses (eight 
credits). 

4. One semester course in ancient history. 

5. Three history courses or seminars (12 credits) 
in a field or fields other than the field of con- 
centration. One of these may be a course 
cross-listed in the history department. 

6. Geographical breadth: at least one course at 
the 200- or 300- level in each of three of the 



266 

following six geographical regions. 

Africa 

East Asia and Central Asia 

Europe 

Latin America 

Middle East and South Asia 

North America 

Courses in the field of concentration and outside 
the field of concentration may be used to satisfy 
this requirement. AP credits may not be used to 
satisfy this requirement. 



Graduate 



511 Problems in European History to 1300 

{H} 4 credits 

521 Problems in Early Modern History 

{H} 4 credits 

541 Problems in Modern European History 

{H} 4 credits 

571 Problems in American History 

{H} 4 credits 

580 Special Problems in Historical Study 

Arranged individually with graduate students. {H} 

4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

590 Research and Thesis 

{H} 4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

590d Research and Thesis 

{H} 8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 



267 



Program in the History of Science 
and Technology 

Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Isers 

k Aldrich, Marilyn Carlson Nelson Professor of 

Economics 

Tie Bergmann, Associate Professor of 

Computer Science 

ile Aka Burk, Senior Lecturer in Chemistry 

■ Dempsey, Museum of Art 

g Felton, Professor of Art 

tanael Fortune, Associate Professor of Physics 

i)line M.Houser, Professor of Art 

!*a Katz, Assistant Professor of Biological 

Sciences 



Thomas Litwin, Adjunct Associate Professor of 

Biological Sciences 
* 2 Albert Mosley, Professor of Philosophy 
Douglas Lane Patey, Professor of English Language 

and Literature 
** 2 Jeffry Ramsey, Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
Marjorie Senechal, Professor of Mathematics and 

of History of Science and Technology, Director 
** 2 Harold Skulsky, Professor of English Language 

and Literature 



|ii's Program in the History of Science and 
sinology 7 is designed to serve all Smith students, 
frses in the program examine science and tech- 
!>gy in their historical, cultural and social con- 
L and the ways in winch they have shaped and 
iinue to shape human culture (and vice versa), 
ing many disciplines and cultures, the minor 
: plements majors in the humanities, social 
'aces, and the natural sciences. 

:: Images and Understanding 
I) contended that god did not give the universe 
? because, since the universe contains every- 
[g, there is nothing external to see. On the 
t r hand, we use the expression "I see" as a 
rmym for "I understand." In this course we will 
'y key historical events that have shaped the 
r>es through which we understand the world. 
l cs and questions to be considered include: the 
i:ture of the eye and the process of perception; 
t ries of light; visual instrumentation; imaging in 
:ice and in art; and the use of visual metaphors 
i ientific thinking. {H/N} 4 credits 
& 'orie Senechal, Douglas Patey 
^ red Spring 2003 



211 Perspectives in the History of Science 

Science, Technology, and Silk 
The story of silk traces an unusual path through 
the history of science and technology. It begins 
with the origins of silk culture and its varied uses 
in ancient China. Silk became an important agri- 
cultural and manufacturing industry in the West 
after silkworms were smuggled from China, but its 
basic practices remained virtually unchanged until 
the industrial revolution. The invention of the 
power loom and Pasteur's discovery of the causes 
of some silkworm diseases mechanized and ratio- 
nalized the industry, changing it — and the world 
of the silk workers — forever (Northampton's own 
vanished silk industry, which spanned both eras, is 
an interesting case study.) The story is not over: 
the most remarkable silk factory; the tiny silkwork 
itself, remains something of a scientific and tech- 
nological mystery. 2002-03 is the culminating 
year of the Northampton Silk Project; the Project's 
lectures and exhibitions will be woven into this 
course. Enrollment limited to 20 students. {H/N} 
4 credits 

Marjorie Senechal 
Offered Fall 2002 



268 



Program in the History of Science and Techno] 



Technology and the Development of the Modern 
World 

An introduction to the role of technological 
change as it has shaped the modern world and the 
forces that shape the evolution of technology. In 
what sense is technology socially constructed? 
Does technology drive history? What are the inter- 
relationships between science and technology/ 
between technology and war? How have steam 
engines, automobiles, electricity, computers and 
other technologies reshaped everyday life? Stu- 
dents will explore these and other issues through 
readings, problem sets, videos and field trips. 
{H/N} 4 credits 
MarkAldrich 
Offered Spring 2003 

PHI 224 Philosophy and History of Scientific 
Thought 

What is science? What counts as good science? 
How has good science changed over time? How do 
we account for the changes? Using historical mate- 
rial, this course examines how scientists and histo- 
rians and philosophers of science have addressed 
these and other questions concerning the inter- 
pretation of scientific activity. {N} 4 credits 
Jill de Vi liters 
Offered Fall 2002 

404 Special Studies 

4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

Cross-Listed Courses 

ANT 131 Perspectives on Human Behavior 
and Evolution 

The physiological, social and ecological premises 
of human behavior and their basis in primate so- 
cial and communication systems. Our biological 
development as hominids and its behavioral cor- 
relates. The uniqueness of language and technol- 
ogy as human adaptations. Contemporary political 
implications of the agricultural revolution and the 
rise of the early city and early state. Will our late 
20th century commitment to modern technology 
and global communication prove to be a vision or 
a trap? {S/N} 4 credits 
Elizabeth Hopkins 
Offered Spring 2003 



ANT 248 Medical Anthropology 

The cultural construction of illness through an 
examination of systems of diagnosis, classificati 
and therapy in both non-Western and Western 
societies. Special attention given to the role oft 
traditional healer. The anthropological contribi 
tion to international health care and to the trail 
of physicians in the United States. Enrollment li 
ited to 30. {S/N} 4 credits 
Donald Joralemon 
Offered Fall 2002 

ARC 211 Introduction to Archaeology 

An introduction to interdisciplinary archaeolog 
inquiry. The goals of archaeology; concepts of 1 
and space; excavation techniques; ways of orde 
ing and studying important categories of finds 
such as pottery, bones, stone and metal objects 
and organic materials. Archaeological theory a 
method and how each affects the reconstructio 
the past. Illustrative material, both prehistorica 
and historical, will be drawn primarily but not 
exclusively from the culture of the Mediterrane 
Bronze Age and the time of Homer. Enrollment 
limited to 30. {H/S} 4 credits 
Susan Allen 
Offered Fall 2002 

AST 102 Sky I: Time 

Explore the concept of time, with emphasis on 
astronomical roots of clocks and calendars. 01 
serve and measure the cyclical motions of the I 
the moon, and the stars and understand phase: 
the moon, lunar and solar eclipses, seasons. E 
rollment limited to 25 per section. {N} 3 credit 
Suzan Edwards, Meg Thacher 
Offered both semesters each year 

AST 215 History of Astronomy 

Lectures, readings, and discussions. Developm 
in astronomy and their relation to other scienc 1 
and the social background. Astronomy and co:- 
mology from earliest times; Babylonian and Eg k 
tian computations and astrological divinations 
Greek science, the Ionians, Pythagorean cosm 
Aristotelian universe, and Ptolemaic system; Is 
lamic developments, rise of the medieval univtf 
and science and technology in the Middle Age: 
the Copernican revolution and the infinite uni- 
verse; the Newtonian universe of stars and nat il 



)gram in the History' of Science and Technology 



269 



rs; the mechanistic universe in the Age of Rea- 
i of the 18th and 19th centuries. Development 
gravitational theory from ancient to modern 
es; development in our understanding of the 
gin, structure, and evolution of stars and galax- 
, and developments in modern astronomy. Non- 
Jinical, with emphasis on history and cosmol- 
I {H/N} 4 credits 
-hard White 
t offered in 2002-03 



HST 244 (L) The Scientific Revolution, 1500- 
1700 

Science, society, and religion in Europe from the 
Middle Ages to the French Revolution. Topics in- 
clude Aristotelianism; magic and occult philoso- 
phies; baroque artisans and the mechanical phi- 
losophy; Galileo and the Catholic Church; 
Descartes vs. Newton; Newtonianism, deism, and 
atheism in the 18th-century. {H} 4 credits 
Not offered 2002-03 



M 102 The Chemistry of Artists' Materials 

1 Techniques 

I offered in 2002-03 

R 101 Structures and the Built 
i/ironment 

s course, designed for a general audience, ex- 
tnes the development of large structures (tow- 
L bridges, domes) throughout history with em- 
Isis on the past 200 years. Following the evolu- 
i of ideas and materials, it introduces students 
|he interpretation of significant works from 
btific, social, and symbolic perspectives. Ex- 
ples include the Brooklyn Bridge, the Eiffel 
j/er, and the Big Dig. {N} 4 credits 
ifrew Guswa 
lered Fall 2002 

! 3 207 The Technology of Reading and 
I ting 

introductory exploration of the physical forms 
l knowledge and communication have taken in 
tWest, from ancient oral cultures to modern 
► it-literate culture. Our main interest will be in 
I overing how what is said and thought in a cul- 
v reflects its available kinds of literacy and me- 
i of communication. Topics to include poetry 
u memory in oral cultures; the invention of writ- 
p the invention of prose; literature and science 
r script culture; the coming of printing; chang- 
r.concepts of publication, authorship, and origi- 
t ty; movements toward standardization in lan- 
Pge; political implications of different kinds and 
els of literacy. [3e] {L} 4 credits 
I ' Reeves 
^red Spring 2003 



HST 256 (C) The Industrial Revolution 

European industrialization and industrialism 
1600-1 9 18. Focus on changes in technology and 
in the associated languages of work, wealth, and 
power. Britain as workshop of the world; work as 
a physical and social-economic concept; the steam 
engine and thermodynamics; mechanization of 
warfare; photography and the industrial city; his- 
torical materialism and the origins of the concept 
of industrial revolution. {H} 4 credits 
Not offered in 2002-03 

MTH 350 Topics in the History of 
Mathematics 

Topic: Mathematical communities 
Subjects will include Plato's Academy, Fermat and 
his correspondents, mathematics at Gottingen, and 
the funding of American mathematics. Prerequi- 
site: any two of 217, 224, 233, 238, 243, or per- 
mission of the instructor. {M} 4 credits 
Not offered in 2002-03 

PHI 228 Philosophy and Technology 

This course will survey recent literature in the 
philosophy of technology. It will cover the nature 
of technology, its relationship to physical labor, the 
use of information technology' to replace and en- 
hance managerial functions, and the impact of 
developments in biotechnology. The course will 
discuss various views concerning the nature of 
science, whether technology should be viewed as 
applied science, and how science and technology 
should be viewed from a multicultural perspective. 
Finally, the course will look at the relationship 
between technology, ethics, politics, and risk- 
assessment. {S} 4 credits 
Albert Mosley 
Offered Fall 2002 



270 



Program in the History of Science and Technol 



PHI 315 Seminar: Philosophy of Science 

Topic: Philosophy of Biology 
This course discusses the structure of evolutionary 
theory and its relation to other biological disci- 
plines, the evidence for it, and the scope of its 
explanatory significance. The relation of evolution- 
ary theory to other biological sciences is treated. 
Finally the implications of the theory for such con- 
troversial issues as creationism, teleology, nature 
versus nurture and sociobiology are examined. 
{N/M} 4 credits 
Jeffry Ramsey 
Offered Spring 2003 

PHY 105 Principles of Physics 

This conceptual course explores the laws of me- 
chanics, electricity and magnetism, sound and 
light, relativity and quantum theory. It is designed 
for nonscience majors and does not rely on math- 
ematical tools. Lecture demonstrations and some 
hands-on investigation will be included. {N} 
4 credits 

Nathanael Fortune 
Offered Fall 2002 



The Minor 



Requirements: Two courses in the natural or 
mathematical sciences and two courses in histo 
chosen in consultation with the student's minor 
adviser, and two courses in (or cross-listed in) 
history of science and technology program. Noi 
mally one of the history of science and technolc 
courses will be Special Studies, 404a or 404b, 1 
another course may be substituted with the ap- 
proval of the adviser. Work at the Smithsonian 
Institution in the Picker Program counts as one 
course toward the minor. Students considering 
minor in the history of science and technology ; 
urged to consult with their advisers as early as 
possible. 



PPY 209 Philosophy and History of 
Psychology 

The course will examine how the child learns her 
first language. What are the central problems in 
the learning of word meanings and grammars? 
Evidence and arguments will be drawn from Lin- 
guistics, Psychology, and Philosophy, and cross- 
linguistic data as well as English. Prerequisite: 
either PSY 111, PSY 233, PHI 100, or PHI 236, 
or permission of the instructor. {N} 4 credits 
Peter de Villiers and Jill de Villiers 
Offered Spring 2004 



271 



International Relations 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



vlsers 

Steven Martin Goldstein, Professor of 

Government 

Elizabeth Erickson Hopkins, Professor of 

Anthropology 

Elliot Fratkin, Professor of Anthropology 

}regory White, Associate Professor of 

Government 



Mahnaz Mahdavi, Associate Professor of 

Economics 
Mlada Bukovansky, Assistant Professor of 

Government, Director 
Tandeka Nkiwane, Instructor in Government 



i international relations minor offers an oppor- 
ity for students to pursue an interest in interna- 
lal affairs as a complement to their majors. The 
>gram provides an interdisciplinary course of 
dy designed to enhance the understanding of 

complex international processes — political, 
momic, social, cultural, and environmental — 
t are increasingly important to all nations. 

In keeping with the interdisciplinary nature of 
: minor, beyond completion of GOV 241, stu- 
k its may take no more than two courses in any 
I department to count toward the minor. 

luirements: six semester courses including 
V 241, plus one course from each of the fol- 
ding five groups: 

One course in global institutions or problems, 
such as international law or organizations, 
economic development, arms control and 
disarmament, the origins of war, resource 
and environmental issues, or world food prob- 
lems. Among courses at Smith would be the 
following: 



K232 

£236 
[241 

»f243 



Third World Politics: Anthropological 

Perspectives 

Economy, Ecology, and Society 

Anthropology of Development 

Colloquium in Political Ecology 



ANT 340 



ANT 341 



GEO 109 
GOV 231 
GOV 233 

GOV 254 
GOV 324 
GOV 341 

GOV 345 



Seminar: Postcolonial Politics: Identity, 

Power and Conflict in the Developing 

World 

Seminar: Sacred Power as Secular 

Politics: Ideology, Legitimacy and 

Action 

The Environment 

Government and Plural Societies 

Problems in Political Development 

Politics of the Global Environment 

Seminar in Comparative Government 

Seminar in International Politics: 

United States Foreign Policy 

Seminar in International Politics: 

Globalization and International 

Migration 



2. One course in international economics or 
finance: 

ECO 206 International Finance 
ECO 209 Comparative Economic Systems 
GOV 242 The Politics of International Economic 
Relations 

3. One course in contemporary American foreign 
policy: 

GOV 244 Foreign Policy of the United States 
HST273 Contemporary America 



, 



272 



International Relati< 



4. One course in modern European history or 
government with an international emphasis: 

ECO 3 1 1 Seminar: Topics in Economic 

Development 
GOV 22 1 The Politics of Western Europe 
GOV 222 The Politics of East and Central 

Europe 
HST 240 Tradition and Change in Russian and 

Soviet History, 1801-Present 
HST 245 The Middle Ages and the Renaissance 

in European Thought, 1750-1870 
HST 247 The Rise and Collapse of the Russian 

and Soviet Empires 
HST 250 Europe in the 19th Century 
HST 2 5 1 Europe in the 20th Century 

5. One course on the economy, politics, or soci- 
ety of a region other than the United States and 
Europe: 



Africa 
ant 231 

ANT 232 

ANT 236 

GOV 224 

GOV 227 
GOV 345 
GOV 347 

Asia 



Africa: A Continent in Crisis 
Third World PoHtics: 
Anthropological Perspectives 
Economy, Ecology and Society 
Government and Politics of the 
Middle East and North Africa 
Government and Politics of Sub- 
Saharan Africa 

Seminar in International Politics: 
South Africa in World Politics 
Seminar in International Politics: 
Algeria in the International System 



GOV 228 Government and Politics of Japan 
GOV 230 Government and Politics of China 
GOV 344 Seminar on Foreign Policy of the 

Chinese People's Republic 
GOV 348 Seminar in International Politics: 

Conflict and Cooperation in Asia 
GOV 349 Seminar in International Relations and 

Comparative Politics: The Political 

Economy of the Newly Industrializing 

Countries of Asia 



GOV 35 1 Seminar in Comparative 

Government and International 
Relations: Foreign Policy of Japan 

HST 2 1 2 China in Transformation A.D. 700- 
1900 

HST 2 1 3 Aspects of East Asian History 

HST 218 Thought and Art in China 

REL 270 Religious History of India (Ancient & 
Classical) 

REL 2 7 1 Religious History of India (Medieval 
& Modern) 

REL 272 Buddhist Thought 

Middle East 

GOV 224 Government and Politics of the 
Middle East and North Africa 

GOV 229 Government and Politics of Israel 

GOV 248 The Arab-Israeli Dispute 

HST 208 The Shaping of the Modern Middle Ei 

HST 209 Aspects of Middle Eastern History: 
Modern Egypt 

REL 275 The Islamic Tradition 

REL 278 Religion and Politics in Islam 

Latin America 

ANT 237 Native South Americans: Conquest 

and Resistance 
ECO 318 Seminar: Latin American Economics 
GOV 226 Latin American Political Systems 
GOV 322 Seminar in Comparative Government 

Mexican Politics from 1910-Present 
GOV 324 Seminar in Comparative Government 

Transitions to Democracy, Gender an 

Leadership 
GOV 343 Seminar in International Politics 
HST 261 National Latin America, 182 1 to the 

Present 
HST 263 Continuity and Change in Spanish 

America and Brazil 
LAS 100 Perspectives on Latin America 

At the discretion of the adviser, equivalent cour J 
at other colleges may be substituted for Smith ( - 
lege courses. 



273 



nterterm Courses Offered for Credit 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



f 242j Andean-Amazonia Spirituality and 
Agro-Biodiversity 

( 295) Museum Studies 

4 24lj How NMR Really Works 

175) Applied Exercise Science 

910j Badminton 

940j Hiking and Canyoneering 

945) Physical Conditioning 

255j Speaking (Like The) French: 
Conversing, Discussing, Debating, 
Arguing 



GEO 235) Scanning Electron Microscopy and 

Energy Dispersive X-Ray Microanalysis 

GEO 270j Carbonate Systems and Coral Reefs of 
the Bahamas 

HST241J The Moscow Kremlin 

PHI 253) Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Philosophy 
and Hermeneutics 

SPN 218j Speaking Spanish in Context 

SPN222J Interterm in Madrid 

SPN 223) Afro-Cuban Culture: Theater and Dance 

A schedule of important dates and information 
applicable to January Interterm courses is issued 
by the Registrar's Office prior to pre-registration in 
the fall. 



274 



Italian Language and Literature 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professor Instructors 

f ' Alfonso Procaccini, Ph.D. Emanuele Occhipinti, Dottore in lingue 

Federica Anichini, M.A. 

Associate Professors 

Giovanna Bellesia, Ph.D. Lecturer 

Anna Botta, Ph.D., Chair (Italian and Comparative Barbara Spinelli, M.A. 

Literature) 

Assistant in Italian 

Senior Lecturer Maria Focarete 

**' Vittoria Offredi Poletto, B.A. 



Students planning to major in Italian and/or in- 
tending to spend their Junior Year in Italy should 
start studying Italian in their first semester in or- 
der to meet all requirements. The only other pos- 
sibility is to enroll in an intensive summer pro- 
gram prior to their sophomore year. All students 
going to Florence for their Junior Year Abroad 
must take ITL 250 in the spring of their sopho- 
more year. Courses in Art, European history and 
in other literatures are also recommended. 



Language 



Credit is not granted for the first semester only 
of our introductory language course. ITL 1 lOd. 

llOd Accelerated Elementary Italian 

One-year course that covers the basics of Italian 
language and culture and allows students to enroll 
in ITL 220 and ITL 250 the following year. Prefer- 
ence is given to all first-year students planning to 
go to Italy for their Junior Year. Four class meet- 
ings per week plus required weekly multimedia 
work. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. Stu- 
dents entering in the spring need permission of 
the department and must take a placement exam. 



Students must stay in the same section all year. 

10 credits 

Giovanna Bellesia, Director 2002-03 

Members of the Department 

Full year course; Offered each year 

220 High Intermediate Italian 

Comprehensive review through practice in writ 
and conversation. Discussion, compositions an 
oral reports based on Italian literary texts and 
cultural material. Weekly conversation meeting 
and multimedia work required. Prerequisite IT 
1 lOd or permission of the department. {F} 
4 credits 

Members of the Department 
Offered each Fall 

230 Advanced Italian 

A continuation of 220, with emphasis on develi 
ment of style. Intensive oral and written work. 
Highly recommended for students planning to 
to Florence for their Junior Year Abroad who r 
extra work on their language skills. Prerequisi 
220 or permission of the department. {F} 
4 credits 

Giovanna Bellesia, Vittoria Poletto 
Offered each Spring 



lian Language and Literature 



275 



iterature 

ie prerequisite for ITL 250 is ITL 220. 

e prerequisite for 300-level courses is ITL 230 
permission of the instructor. 



>0 Survey of Italian Literature I 

lerequisite for students applying for Junior Year 
I road in Florence. Reading of outstanding works 
d consideration of their cultural and social 
(ckgrounds from the Middle Ages to the Renais- 
ice. Students must also enroll in a discussion 
! ;tion where they will do intensive work on their 
fiting skills. Prerequisite: ITL 220 or permission 
(the instructor. {L/F} 5 credits 
Vmhers of the Department 
fered each Spring 

:»2d Dante: Divina Commedia 

I tailed study of Dante's Commedia in the con- 

h of his other works. Conducted in Italian. 

|/F} 8 credits 

\ierica Anichini 

III year course; Offered each year 

;>0 The Theory and Practice of Translation 

jiis is a course for advanced students of Italian 
|h strong English language skills. Close readings 
:d translations into English of a variety of mod- 
h Italian writers and poets: Morante, Ginzburg, 
ma Banti, Montale, Eco, Tabucchi, Maraini, 
i [vino and others. Extensive practice in translat- 
i ; with some theory. Consideration of the render- 
i;s into Italian by such famous writers as Pavese 
;d Vittorini and exploration of the recent theory 
("hidden translators", said to be women work- 
i; for the famous translators. During the second 
! if of the semester students will select a work for 
ilependent translation as the major component 

< their portfolio of translated work. Professional 
f nslators, writers whose work has been trans- 

1 ed, and researchers in the field of artificial intel- 
lence will be invited to share their experience 
v h the class. Enrollment limited to 12. Permis- 
:n of the instructor (s) required. (E) {L/F} 
credits 
tioria Poletto, Giovanna Bellesia 

< fered Fall 2002 



343 Modern Italian Literature 

Topic: Melancholic Nomadism [Nomadismo 
melanconico] 

Although it is true that wandering and the desire 
for novelty have characterized literature since an- 
tiquity, it is also possible to detect a renewed inter- 
est in contemporary Italian fiction and films for 
depicting this restless nomadism. In novels or 
short stories by Calvino, Celati, Del Giudice, 
Magris, Ortese, and Tabucchi, (as well as in the 
cinema of Moretti and Soldini), characters wander 
in uncanny landscapes where points of reference 
are as moveable and temporary as sand dunes in 
the desert. The narrators themselves are either 
intrusively present or seem to resist organizing 
their character's peregrinations into traditional 
story lines. Through our examination of fiction 
and film, we will also be exploring the rules of the 
road which frame our postmodern geographies 
and the vagrant disquiet which characterizes our 
spatial experience today. Conducted in Italian. 
Permission of the instructor required. {L} 
4 credits 
Anna Botta 

344 Italian Women Writers 

Topic: Mothers and Daughters 
This course provides an in-depth look at the 
changing role of women in Italian society. It fo- 
cuses on the portrayal of motherhood by Italian 
women writers in the 20th century. Authors stud- 
ied include Sibilla Aleramo, Elsa Morante, Natalia 
Ginzburg, and Dacia Maraini. Limited enrollment, 
permission of the instructor required. Conducted 
in Italian. {L} 4 credits 
Giovanna Bellesia 
Offered Spring 2003 

Cross-listed Courses 

The following courses may count towards the 
Italian major if all written work is done in Italian. 

CLT 285 Europe on the Move: Recent 
Narratives of Immigration 

404 Special Studies 

By permission of the chair, for senior majors. 
4 credits 



276 



Italian Language and Literan 



Members of the Department 
Offered both semesters each year 

408d Special Studies 

By permission of the chair, for senior majors. 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 



The Major 



Advisers: Giovanna Bellesia, Anna Botta, Vittoria 
Poletto. 

Advisers for Study Abroad: Giovanna Bellesia, 
Anna Botta, Vittoria Poletto. 

Basis: ITL 220. 

Requirements: the basis, ten semester courses. 
The ten semester courses shall include 230, 250, 
251, and 332d; and four of the following: 338, 
342, 343, 344, 404, CLT 305, CLT 355 (all written 
work in the CLT courses must be done in Italian to 
be accepted for the Italian major). 



knowledge of the Italian language as well as a n 
overview of the history of Italian literature and 
culture. Furthermore, it offers the possibility 7 for 
students returning from study abroad to continu 
with Italian on a limited program. If, a student 
does not wish to major in Italian, a minor woulc 
grant her the opportunity of official recognition 
the courses taken. 

Required: six semester courses including the fol 
lowing: 220, 230, and 250. Choice of two from 
two different periods including: 332d, 338, 342, 
343, 404. 

Courses taken during the Junior Year Abroad in 
Florence will be numbered differently and will b 
considered as equivalent to those offered on the 
Smith campus, subject to the discretion of the 
Department. 

Honors 

Directors: Giovanna Bellesia, Anna Botta, Vittor 
Poletto. 



Courses taken during the Junior Year Abroad in 
Florence will be numbered differently and will be 
considered as equivalent to those offered on the 
Smith campus, subject to the discretion of the 
Department. 

Italian majors are required to take ITL 332d and 
at least one advanced literary seminar in Italian 
during their senior year. 



The Minor 



Advisers: Giovanna Bellesia, Anna Botta, Vittoria 
Poletto. 

A minor in Italian offers the student the opportu- 
nity to acquire the basic skills and a reasonable 



430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 



Graduate 



Advisers: Giovanna Bellesia. Anna Botta. 

Candidates spend their first year in Florence, en 
rolled at the University of Florence and at the 
Smith Center. Required a minimum of 32 credit 
The thesis is written during the second year unc' 
the direction of a member of the Department. ! 

550d Research and Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 



277 



Jewish Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



itin Cammy, A.M., Instructor in Jewish Studies 
tiudit Heller, M.Ed., Lecturer in Jewish Studies 
»lly Snyder, Ph.D., Lecturer in Jewish Studies 

wish Studies Advisory Committee 

•ia Berger, Lecturer in Spanish and Portuguese 
Ernest Benz, Associate Professor of History, 
Director (Fall) 



Justin Cammy, A.M., Instructor in Jewish Studies 
t' Lois Dubin, Associate Professor of Religion and 

Biblical Literature 
**'• * 2 Myron Peretz Glazer, Professor of Sociology 7 
Joel Kaminsky, Assistant Professor of Religion and 

Biblical Literature 
Ellen Kaplan, Associate Professor of Theatre, 

Director (Spring) 
*' Hans Rudolf Vaget, Professor of German Studies 

and Comparative Literature 



Od Elementary Modern Hebrew 

ear-long introduction to modern Hebrew Em- 
lasis on developing skills necessary for fluent 
iding, speaking, and writing. Vocabulary 7 and 
immar are enhanced through the weekly study 
a classic or contemporary hit from the Israeli 
)p-40," and articles in elementary Hebrew from 
ewspaper designed for new immigrants. Enroll- 
nt limited to 20. Normally to be offered every 
:ond year. {F} 8 credits 
tin Cammy 
II year course; Offered 2002-03, 2004-05 

Intermediate Modern Hebrew 

emester-long interaction with modern Hebrew, 
h emphasis on oral proficiency in practical 
wersation and on reading and writing. Students 

1 review grammar, develop their skills as read- 
and writers in modern Hebrew, and gain an 

demanding of the language as a living culture, 
ladings include short stories and poetry by 
l 3mi Shemer, Aharon Megged, Lea Goldberg, 
i da, and Rachel, and explorations of Hebrew 
; 3ular culture through newspapers, comics, film 
p music, such as Sha'ar la-Oleh, Dr. Seuss, and 
■ i\ Silverstein. Prerequisite: at least one year of 
: mentary Hebrew or permission of the instruc- 
t {F} 4 credits. 
hudit Heller 
"ered Fall 2002 



187 Introduction to the Jewish Tradition 

An introduction to Judaism from ancient times to 
the present with a focus on the core texts of the 
Jewish religious tradition and their re-interpreta- 
tion over time. Texts include Torah (Hebrew 
Bible), Talmud, the prayer-book, and works of 
medieval and modern Jewish thought. Concen- 
trates on important ideas informing the tradition, 
such as revelation, messianism and false messiahs, 
diaspora and homeland, mystical speculation, 
gender, and Jewish identity. {L/H} 4 credits 
Justin Cammy 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

200-Level Courses 

CLT 218 Jewish Literature of Catastrophe 

Explores Jewish literary responses to national ca- 
tastrophe from the destruction of ancient Jerusa- 
lem to the Holocaust and its aftermath. Does Holo- 
caust literature build upon existing archetypes 
from Jewish literature or establish itself as an en- 
tirely new literary genre? How do culture, lan- 
guage, and context influence the tenor of re- 
sponses to the destruction of European Jewry? 
Study of works in various languages (particularly 
Hebrew and Yiddish) and a variety of genres 
(memoirs, ghetto diaries, partisan poetry, liturgy, 






278 



Jewish Stud 



novels, comic strips) and of films from different 
nations. All works in English translation. {L} 
4 credits 
Justin Cammy 
Offered Fall 2002 

260 Colloquium: Between Two Worlds: 
Modern Yiddish Literature 

Fiction, poetry, drama and film in English transla- 
tion from Poland, Russia and the United States. 
Topics include the fictional universe of the shtetl; 
dybbuks, golems and demons; the shlemiel; the 
sexual politics of Yiddish; immigrant visions of 
America; the Holocaust; and the modern crisis 
of faith. {L} 4 credits 
Justin Cammy 
Offered 2003-04 

265 Jews and Judaism in America, 1650 to 
the Present 

Topic: Gender in American Jewish History 
The distinctive religious, cultural, and social life 
of Jews in different American settings. Special fo- 
cus on gender roles and Jewish women's lives in 
the contexts of immigration, the Americanization 
of Judaism, assimilation, and the negotiation of 
conflicting identities. Attention to Jewish social and 
communal life as well as contributions of Jews to 
the wider political and cultural scene. (E) {H} 
4 credits 
Holly Snyder 
Offered Fall 2002 

CLT 277 Language, Lineage and Locus: 
The Jewish Writer in the 20th Century 

What is modern Jewish literature? Jews in Europe, 
America and Israel have answered in a variety of 
ways and in a variety of languages. Special atten- 
tion to the relation of language, place and time to 
artistic strategy and to the tension between per- 
sonal, national, and universal perspectives in nar- 
rative. Authors include Sholem Aleichem, Isaac 
Babel, Franz Kafka, Henry Roth, Shmuel Yosef 
Agnon, Anne Frank, Primo Levi, Saul Bellow, 
Cynthia Ozick and A. B. Yehoshua. {L} 4 credits 
Justin Cammy 
Offered 2003-04 



284 Colloquium: Jewish Life in Eastern 
Europe 1750-1914 

The cultural achievements and modern transfor- 
mations of east European Jewish society, with sp 
cial emphasis on religious and ethical worldviev 
educational institutions, literature and internal 
politics. Topics include the confrontation betwee 
tradition and modernity, Hasidic religious renew 
the shifting status of women, the Jewish languag< 
wars, the challenge of Russian anti-Semitism, Je^ 
ish cultural assertion and the emergence of na- 
tionalism and socialism. {H} 4 credits 
Justin Cammy 
Offered 2003-04 

404 Special Studies 

4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 



The Minor 



Advisers: Members of the Jewish Studies Advise 
Committee. 

Students contemplating a minor in Jewish Studie 
should see an adviser as early as possible to de- 
velop a minor course program. This program 
must draw from the areas specified below and 
must be approved by an adviser no later than tin 
beginning of the senior year, though earlier dis- 
cussion is preferable. 

The Jewish Studies program offers an interdi 
ciplinary approach to the study of the history, re 
gion, and culture of the Jews from the biblical I 
period to the contemporary era. Students are er' 
couraged to take courses in a variety of areas, 
including classical texts, Hebrew, history, Jewist) 
thought, literature, and contemporary issues. 

Jewish civilization has a recorded history of ' 
4,000 years, spanning diverse geographic areas 
While located in many civilizations, Jews have ' 
been most intimately involved with those of the 
West and the Middle East. Studying Jews and Ju<- 
ism in these contexts provides students with in- 
sight into the complexities of culture and identi 
A minor in Jewish Studies well complements m 
jors in several fields, among them Comparative 
Literature, Religion, History, Philosophy, Goven 
ment, Anthropology, Sociology, Women's Studie 



Irish Studies 



279 



pent Studies, Medieval Studies, American Stud- 
', and any language and literature program. 

mirements: a total of five courses, which must 
Hude: 

JID 187, Introduction to the Jewish Tradition; 
Four additional courses to be chosen from the 
list below, and distributed over any three of the 
areas of Jewish Studies (i.e. classical texts, 
Hebrew, history, Jewish thought, literature, and 
contemporary issues) . Some courses appear in 
more than one area. A student may use such a 
course to fulfill either one or the other of the 
distribution requirements, but may not use the 
same course to satisfy more than one such 
requirement. 

Classical Texts 



IV. Jewish Thought 



)21i 
>230 

234 
.210 

211 

213 
313 



Women in Rabbinic Literature 
Reading the Bible Through Rabbinic 
Eyes 

Introduction to Rabbinic Literature 
Introduction to the Bible I: Old Testa- 
ment 

Wisdom Literature and Other Books 
from the Writings 
Prophecy in Ancient Israel 
Seminar: Hebrew Bible 



Hebrew 

t> 100d Elementary Modern Hebrew 
\f 120 Intermediate Modern Hebrew 
'. 285 Hebrew Religious Texts I 
1 286 Hebrew Religious Texts II 

| History 

I » 265 Jews and Judaism in America, 

1650-Present 
I 1 284 Jewish Life in Eastern Europe, 

1750-1914 
1 220 Introduction to the Bible H: New 

Testament 
' 236 Insiders/Outsiders: Jews in Modern 

Europe 
t - 320 Seminar: New Testament 



JUL) 233 Law and Religion in Judaism 

REL 234 Judaism and Feminism 

REL 235 Jewish Spirituality: Philosophers and 

Mystics 
REL 236 Insiders/Outsiders: Jews in Modern 

Europe 

V. Literature 

CLT 20 1 Literary Anti-Semitism 

CLT 2 1 8 Jewish Literature of Catastrophe 

CLT 277 Language, Lineage and Locus: 

The Jewish Writer in the 20th Century 
GER 1 5 1 Jews in German Culture 
JUL) 253 Hebrew Poetry Through the Ages 
JUD 260 Between Two Worlds: Modern Yiddish 

Literature 
JUD 262 Jewish American Literature, Culture 

and Performance 
REL 110 People of the Story 
SPN 280 Life Stories by Latin American Jewish 

Writers 
THE 313 Staging the Jew 

VI. Contemporary Issues 

CLT 2 1 8 Jewish Literature of the Catastrophe 
CLT 277 Language, Lineage and Locus: 

The Jewish Writer in the 20th Century 
JUD 262 Jewish American Literature, Culture and 

Performance 
JUD 265 Jews and Judaism in America, 1650 to 

the Present 
REL 1 10 Renew 7 al and Invention in Contemporary 

Judaism 
REL 234 Judaism and Feminism 
REL 335 Seminar: Problems in Jewish Religion 

and Culture: Women, Feminism, and 

Spirituality 

Additional reading courses in Hebrew language 
and literature may be available, supervised by 
members of the program. Students who plan to 
study in Israel or who wish to pursue advanced 
work in Jewish studies should consider beginning 
modern Hebrew at Smith College or the University 
of Massachusetts during their first year. Consult 
the Director of the Jewish Studies Program or a 
member of the Advisory Committee. 



280 



Latin American and 
Latino/a Studies 

Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Advisers and Members of the Latin American 
and Latino/a Studies Committee 

Susan C. Bourque, Professor of Government 
*' Ginetta Candelario, Assistant Professor of 

Sociology and Latin American Studies 
Velma Garcia, Associate Professor of Government 
Maria Estela Harretche, Associate Professor of 

Spanish and Portuguese 
Marguerite Itamar Harrison, Assistant Professor of 

Spanish and Portuguese 
f 2 Michelle Joffroy, Assistant Professor of Spanish 

and Portuguese 



Donald Joralemon, Professor of Anthropology 
Marina Kaplan, Associate Professor of Spanish a 

Portuguese and of Latin American Studies 
Dana Leibsohn, Associate Professor of Art 
** 2 Nola Reinhardt, Professor of Economics 
t 2 Nancy Saporta Sternbach, Professor of Spanii 

and Portuguese 
t 2 Ann Zulawski, Associate Professor of History 

and of Latin American Studies, Director 



201 Colloquium in Latin American and 
Latino/a Studies 

Topic: Negotiating the Borderlands: Text, Film, 
Music 

This course will explore a variety of representa- 
tions of the U.S.-Mexico border, as constructed by 
writers, filmmakers, and musicians from the bor- 
derlands. Of particular interest will be the ways in 
which representations of this specific region have 
changed historically, politically and culturally as 
the border has become more and more a factor in 
both U.S. and Mexican cultural discourses. We will 
examine such questions as: What is the border? 
Where does it begin/end? How does language af- 
fect representation? How have different mediums 
been employed to express the variety of experi- 
ences contained in the borderlands? Who repre- 
sents the border, and how? This course will be 
conducted in English, with course materials in 
Spanish, English, and in translation. 
Michelle Joffroy 
Offered Fall 2002 



301 Seminar: Topics in Latin American 
Studies 

4 credits 

Contemporary Latina Playwrights 
From the shoestring budgets of their collective 
theatre pieces of the 1960s to their high-tech, n 
timedia performance art of the 1990s, U.S. Latii 
have moved from their marginal positions back 
stage to become the central protagonists of the 
efflorescent, hybrid, multicultural art form that 
Latina theatre today. In this course, we will reao 
variety of plays, performance pieces, puppet 
shows, and other art forms that define U.S. Lati 
theatre from the early seventies to the present, i 
Critical readings will accompany the texts. Ever 
effort will be made to actually see a performam 
of some manifestation of Latina theatre. {L/A} 
Nancy Saporta Sternbach 
Offered Spring 2003 

Cuban Society 1898 to the Present 
This seminar examines social change in Cuba, 
particularly focusing on the period since the n - 
lution of 1959- It will emphasize the economic 



i American and Latino/a Studies 



281 



political history of modern Cuba as a basis for 
iiscussion of various aspects of national life, 
ics to be explored may include: Cubas rela- 
ship with the U.S., central planning and eco- 
lic restructuring, race and ethnicity; social 
lge and political pluralism; gender and sexual- 
?ducation; religion; art and architecture; 
thcare and scientific development; music, 
:e, and film. {H/S} 
Zulawski 
ired Spring 2003 

iking Latin America 

ina Kaplan 

tred Spring 2004 

Special Studies 
edits 
ired both semesters each year 



le Major 



major builds on a basic understanding of the 
>ry of Latin America and a developing profi- 
cy in Spanish. (A reading knowledge of Portu- 
;e is also recommended.) Following this, a 
;ram of studies is developed that includes 
rses related to Spanish America and/or Brazil 
l the disciplines of anthropology, art, dance, 
lomics, government, history, literature, sociol- 
and theatre. 

students choosing to spend the junior year 
ying in a Latin American country 7 should con- 
with the appropriate advisers: 

iser for Study Abroad in Spanish America: 

tiellejoffroy. 

iser for Study Abroad in Brazil: Marguerite 
rison. 

>-Year option with Georgetown University: 

lents interested in pursuing graduate studies in 
have the option of completing an M. A. in Latin 
Tican Studies at Georgetown University in only- 
extra year and a summer. Those interested 
it consult with an LAS adviser during their 
tiomore year or early in their junior year. 



Students primarily interested in Latin American 
literature may wish to consult the major programs 
available in the Department of Spanish and Portu- 
guese. 

Basis: HST 260 and HST 261. 

Other Requirements: 

1 . Two courses in Spanish American literature 
usually SPN 260 and SPN 261. Advanced lan- 
guage students may replace one of these with a 
topics course, such as SPN 372 or SPN 373. A 
reading knowledge of Portuguese and/or one 
course related to Brazil is recommended. 

2. Six semester courses (at the intermediate or 
advanced level) dealing with Spanish America 
and Brazil; at least two of the six must be in the 
social sciences (anthropology, economics, 
history, government, sociology) ; at least one 
four-credit course must be in the arts (art his- 
tory, dance, theatre, film); at least two of the 
six must be at the 300-level. 

Approved Courses for 
2002-04 

Afro-American Studies 

366 Caribbean Peoples, Caribbean Societies 
Offered Fall 2003 
Black Performance Practices: Cuba 
Offered Fall 2002 
Afro-Caribbean Spirituality 
Offered Spring 2003 



Anthropology 



237 
344 

Art 

130 



Native South Americans 

Offered Spring 2004 

Topics in Medical Anthropology: 

Healers 

Offered Fall 2002 



Introduction to the Arts of Africa, 
Oceania and the Americas 
Offered Spring 2003 



282 



Latin American and Latino/a Studii 



204 Pre-Columbian Arts 
Offered Fall 2002 


263 Continuity and Change in Spanish 
America and Brazil 


304 Colonialization and Visual Culture, 
Latin America from 1520-1820 


Topic: Central America: Reform, 
Reaction, Revolution 


Offered Spring 2003 


Offered Fall 2002 


Comparative Literature 


Sociology 


268 Latina and Latin American Women 


213 Ethnic Minorities in the U.S. 


Writers 

Offered Spring 2003 


Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

2 1 4 Sociology of Hispanic Caribbean 
Communities in the United States 


Dance 


Offered Fall 2003 


142 Cuban Dance 

Offered Fall 2002 


Spanish and Portuguese 


Haitian Dance 
Offered Fall 2003 


POR 220 Topics in Portuguese and Brazilian 
Literature and Culture 


375 Anthropology of Dance 
Offered Fall 2003 


Topic: Brazilian Poetry and 
Performance Art 




Offered Fall 2002 


Economics 


POR 221 Topics in Portuguese and Brazilian 



211 Economic Development 

Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

Government 

216 Minority Politics 

Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

226 Latin American Political Systems 

Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 
237 Colloquium: Politics of the U.S./ 

Mexico Border 

Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 
307 Seminar in American Government 

Topic: Latinos and Politics in the 

United States 

Offered Fall 2002 
322 Seminar in Comparative Politics 

Topic: Mexican Politics, 1910 to Present 

Offered Fall 2003 



History 

260 
261 



Colonial Latin America, 1492-1821 

Offered Fall 2002 

National Latin America, 1821 to the 

Present 

Offered Spring 2003 



Literature and Culture 

Topic: Shifting Landscapes in Brazilian 

Film 

Offered Spring 2003 

Topic: The Brazilian Body: Represent 

Women in Brazil's Literature and 

Culture 

Offered Spring 2004 
SPN 230 Topics in Latin American and 

Peninsular Literature 

Topic: History of the Short Story 

Offered Fall 2002 

Topic: Modern and Contemporary 

Poetry: A Transatlantic Search for 

Identity 

Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 
SPN 240 "Performing Text: From Page to Stage 

Topic: Rulfo and Garcia Marquez 

Offered Fall 2003 
SPN 245 Topics in Latin American Literature 

Topic: Latin American Film as Visual 

Narrative 

Offered Spring 2003 
SPN 246 Topics in Latin American Literature 

Topic: Modern Amazonian Literature 

Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

Topic: Literary Constructions of 

Afro-Cuban Identities 

Offered Fall 2002 



tin American and Latino/a Studies 



283 



N260 



N261 



N280 



■N371 



N372 



N373 



N380 



Topic: Latin American Jewish Literature 

Offered Spring 2004 

Survey of Latin American Literature I 

Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

Survey of Latin American Literature II 

Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

Voices of Spain and Latin America in 

Translation 

Topic: Latin American Jewish Literature 

Offered Spring 2003 

Latin American Literature in a Regional 

Context 

Topic: Argentina, Chile and Uruguay 

Offered Fall 2002 

Topic: Caribbean Literature 

Offered Spring 2004 

Themes in Spanish and Portuguese 

Studies 

Topic: Culture and Identity 

Offered Fall 2002 

Topic: The Sixties Revisited 

Offered Fall 2003 

Literary Movements in Latin American 

Literature 

Topic: Mexico in its Revolutions 

Offered Spring 2003 

Advanced Literary Studies 

Topic: Translating Poetry 

Offered Fall 2003 



he Minor in Latin 
.merican Studies 

j quirements: six courses dealing with Latin 
< lerica to be selected from anthropology, art, 
• onomics, government, history, and literature. 
' ey must include HST 260, HST 261, and SPN 
. or SPN 261, and at least one course at the 
level. 



The Minor in Latino/a 
Studies 

Requirements: six courses which must include the 
following: HST 260 or HST 261, SPN 260 or SPN 
261, one other class on Latin America to be cho- 
sen from anthropology, art, economics, govern- 
ment, history, or literature; and three classes in 
Latino/a Studies to be chosen from CLT 268, GOV 
216, GOV 307, SOC 214, SOC 314, or any other 
course in LAS, SPN, etc. dealing with Latino/a Stud- 
ies. At least one of the six courses must be at the 
300-level. Students may count one course in 
Latino/a Studies from another Five College institu- 
tion towards the minor; students may also substi- 
tute a Spanish-language class at the 200 level for 
SPN260/SPN261. 



Honors 

Director: Marina Kaplan. 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 



431 Thesis 

8 credits 
Offered each Fall 

Admission by permission of the Latin American 
Studies Committee. 

Requirements: the same as those for the major; 
a thesis proposal, preferably prepared during the 
second semester of the student's junior year and 
submitted for consideration no later than the 
end of the first week of classes the following 
September; a thesis and an oral examination 
on the thesis. 



For Five-College Certificate in Latin American Stud- 
ies see the description on page 394. 



284 



Logic 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Co-Directors and Advisers 

**' James Henle, Professor of Mathematics 



Merrie Bergmann, Associate Professor of 

Computer Science 
Jay Garfield, Professor of Philosophy 



In this century, logic has grown into a major disci- 
pline with applications to mathematics, philoso- 
phy, computer science, linguistics, and cognitive 
science. The goal of the logic minor is to provide 
students with the tools, techniques, and concepts 
necessary to appreciate logic and to apply it to 
other fields. 

100 Valid and Invalid Reasoning: What 
Follows from What? 

Formal logic and its application to the evaluation 
of everyday arguments, the abstract properties of 
logical systems, the implications of inconsistency. 
Examples drawn from law, philosophy, economics, 
literary criticism, political theory; commercials, 
mathematics, psychology, computer science, off- 
topic debating, and the popular press. Deduction 
and induction, logical symbolism and operations, 
paradoxes, and puzzles. May not be taken for 
credit with PHI 202. {M} Wl 4 credits 
James Henle (Mathematics), Jay Garfield 
(Philosophy) 
Offered Fall 2002 

PHI 202 Symbolic Logic 

Symbolic logic is an important tool of contempo- 
rary philosophy, mathematics, computer science, 
and linguistics. This course provides students with 
a basic background in the symbols, concepts, and 
techniques of modern logic. It will meet for the 
first half of the semester only. Enrollment limited 
to 20. {M} 2 credits 
Merrie Bergmann 
Offered Spring 2003 



PHI 203 Topics in Symbolic Logic 

Applications of logic to fundamental issues in pi 
losophy, mathematics, and computer science. P 
requisite: LOG 100 or PHI 202. Topic: Fuzzy Loj 
After the initial meeting, the course will meet fo 
the second half of the semester. {M} 2 credits 
Merrie Bergmann 
Offered Spring 2003 

PHI 220 Incompleteness and Inconsistenc 
Topics in the Philosophy of Logic 

Among the most important and philosophically 
intriguing results in Twentieth Century Logic art 
the limitative theorems such as Godel's incom- 
pleteness theorem and Tarski's demonstration ( 
the indefinability of truth in certain languages, J 
wide variety of approaches to resolving fundam 
tal mathematical and semantical paradoxes hav 
emerged in the wake of these results, as well as 
variety of alternative logics including paracon- 
sistent logics in which contradictions are toler- 
ated. This course examines logical and semanti 
paradoxes and their philosophical significance, 
well as the choice between accepting incomplet 
ness and inconsistency in logic and knowledge. 
Prerequisite: one course in logic. {M} 4 credits 
Jay Garfield 
Spring 2003 

404 Special Studies 

4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 



gic 285 

he Minor 

nors in logic, to be designed in consultation 
th a Co-Director, will consist of at least 20 cred- 
including: 

>G 100 or PHI 202, but not both 
[ft 153 or CSC 250 
[ft 217 or PHI 220 

ditional courses may be chosen from the fol- 
ding list: 

C 1 1 1 Computer Science I 
C 2 50 Foundations of Computer Science 
C 270 Digital Circuits and Computer Systems 
C 290 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence 
C 294 Introduction to Computational 

Linguistics 
'G404 Special Studies in Logic 
ffl 153 Discrete Mathematics 
[ft 217 Mathematical Structures 
II 203 Topics in Symbolic Logic 
U 220 Logic and the Undecidable 
(1 236 Linguistic Structures 
II 322 Topics in Advanced Logic 

pending on the topic, the courses listed below 
iv also be taken for Logic minor credit: 

C 390 Seminar in Artificial Intelligence 

rH 224 Topics in Geometry 

[ft 238 Topics in Number Theory 

[ft 343 Topics in Mathematical Analysis 

tft 350 Topics in the History of Mathematics 

(1 362 Seminar: Philosophy of Language 

ere are also courses at Five College institutions 
it may be acceptable, courses in linguistics and 
*, for example. 



286 



Marine Sciences 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



i 



Advisers 

t 1 H. Allen Curran, Professor of Geology, 

Co-Director 
**' Paulette Peckol, Professor of Biological 

Sciences, Co-Director 



* 2 C. John Burk, Professor of Biological Science 
L. David Smith, Assistant Professor of Biological 



Sciences, Co-Director 



The marine sciences minor permits students to 
pursue interests in coastal and oceanic systems 
through an integrated sequence of courses in the 
natural and social sciences. 

An introduction to marine sciences is obtained 
through completion of the two basis courses. Stu- 
dents then may choose to concentrate their further 
study principally on the scientific investigation of 
the oceans or on the polity aspects of ocean ex- 
ploitation and management. Students should con- 
sult with one of the co-directors as early as pos- 
sible in the course selection process. 

Requirements: six courses, no more than three 
of which can be taken at other institutions, includ- 
ing three required courses as follows: 

GEO 108 Oceanography; BIO 264 Marine Ecology 
(BIO 265 must be taken concurrently); a Special 
Studies or seminar course chosen in consultation 
with the minor adviser; and three elective courses 
from the following areas, only two of which may 
be counted in a major: 

Biological Sciences 

242/243 Invertebrate Zoology and required 

Concurrent Laboratory 243 
260 Principles of Ecology and optional 

Concurrent Laboratory 261 
338 Morphology of Algae and Fungi and 

required Concurrent Laboratory 339 
356/357 Plant Ecology and required Concurrent 

Laboratory 



364 



400 






Topics in Environmental Biology 
Coral Reefs: Past, Present and Future 
Special Studies 



Geology 






2 3 1 Invertebrate Paleontology and 

Paleoecology 
232 Sedimentology 

270j Carbonate Systems and Coral Reefs oi 

the Bahamas 
3 1 1 Environmental Geophysics 
355 Geology Seminar: Coral Reefs: Past, 

Present and Future 

Social Sciences 

ECO 224 Environmental Economics 
GOV 254 Politics of the Global Environment 
GOV 306 Politics and the Environment 
GOV 404 Special Studies 
PPL 303 Seminar in Public Policy of Marine a 
Coastal Resources 

Five College Course Possibilities 

Courses can be chosen with consultation and a 
proval of minor advisers; examples would be (: 
UMass): 



Biology 524s 
Geology 591f 
Geography 392As 
WF Conser. 261 



Coastal Plant Ecology 
Marine Micropaleontolog 
Coastal Resource Policy 
Fisheries Conservation an 
Management 



- 



Ixine Sciences 287 

I J-Campus Course Possibilities 

; me students may elect to take two or three of 
lir courses for the minor away from Smith Col- 
l';e by participation in a marine-oriented, off- 
:npus program. In recent years Smith students 
K been enrolled in the following programs: 

irine Biological Laboratory (Boston University 
nine Program, fall semester) and Woods Hole 
eanographic Institution (summer) — Smith is 
affiliate through the Five College Coastal and 
•rine Sciences Program; Williams/Mystic Sea- 
rt Program (Smith is an affiliate); SEA Semester; 
ike University Marine Laboratory, Semester and 
mmer Program; marine programs of School for 
•Id Studies, and Shoals Marine Laboratory. 



288 



Mathematics 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

Marjorie Lee Senechal, Ph.D. 
James Joseph Callahan, Ph.D. 
Michael 0. Albertson, Ph.D. 
* 2 David Warren Cohen, Ph.D., Chair 
**' James M. Henle, Ph.D. 
Katherine Taylor Halvorsen, D.Sc. 
t 2 Ruth Haas, Ph.D. (Mathematics and 
Engineering) 



Associate Professors 

**' Patricia L. Sipe, Ph.D. 

Pau Atela, Ph.D. 

**' § 2 Christophe Gole, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors 

Leanne Robertson, Ph.D. 
Yoonin Lee, Ph.D. 
Catherine McCune, Ph.D. 



Senior Lecturer 

Mary Murphy, M.A.T. 



A student with three or four years of high school 
algebra (the final year may be called analysis, pre- 
calculus, trigonometry, functions, or AP mathemat- 
ics) but no calculus, will normally enroll in Calcu- 
lus I ( 1 1 1) . A student with a year of calculus will 
normally enroll in Calculus: Effective Computation 
and Power Series (1 14) or Discrete Mathematics 
(153) — or both — during her first year. If a stu- 
dent has a year of BC calculus, she may omit 
MTH114. 

A student with two years of high school alge- 
bra, but no calculus or precalculus, should enroll 
in Elementary Functions (102). This course pro- 
vides a solid basis for calculus and some of our 
majors start here. A student who has not studied 
mathematics for an extended period of time 
should consult Mary Murphy. 

Discovering Mathematics (105) and Statistical 
Thinking (107) are intended for students not ex- 
pecting to major in mathematics, the sciences, 
engineering, or economics. 

A student who chooses to accelerate and who 
has a score of 4 or 5 on the AB Calculus Examina- 
tion may receive 4 credits, providing she does not 
take 1 1 1 or 1 12 for credit. If she has a score of 
4 or 5 on the BC Examination she may receive 
4 credits providing she does not take 1 1 1 or 1 12 



for credit; or 8 credits if she does not take 111, j 
1 12, or 1 14 for credit. She can receive credit for 
at most one of these examinations. A student who, 
has a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Statistics Examinai 
tion may receive 4 credits, providing she does no, 
take 107 or 245 for credit. 

Students who are considering a major or mi- 
nor in mathematics are encouraged to talk with 
members of the department. 

For further information about the mathematir 
program, consult A Guide to Mathematics at 
Smith (available from department members and 
at our website, www.math.smith.edu). 

EDP/QSK 101 Quantitative Skills 

This course is intended for students who need 
additional preparation to succeed in courses con 
taming quantitative material. It will provide a sup- 
portive environment for learning or reviewing, as 
well as applying, pre-calculus mathematical skill 
Students develop their numerical, statistical and 
algebraic skills by working with numbers drawn I 
from a variety of current media sources. Enroll- 
ment limited to 20. Permission of the instructor < 
required. (E) {M} 4 credits 
To be announced 
Offered Fall 2002 



lematics 



289 



I! Elementary Functions 
jar, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and 
Imometric functions; graphs, mathematical 
jlels, and optimization. For students who need 
[.itional preparation before taking calculus or 
putative courses in scientific fields, economics, 
i'rnment, and sociology. Also recommended for 
I ents planning to teach in elementary school or 
idle school. {M} Wl 4 credits 
\y Murphy 
»red Fall 2002 

> Discovering Mathematics 

ic: What is mathematics? 
I rvey of important ideas from the major areas 
mathematics. Topics selected on the basis of 
ietics and lasting impact. Laboratories explore 
I role of experimentation in mathematics. Wl 
4 credits 
\e Albert son 
*red Spring 2003 

' Statistical Thinking 
ntroduction to statistics that teaches broadly 
ivant concepts. Students from all disciplines are 
':ome. Topics include graphical and numerical 
fhods for summarizing data; binomial and nor- 
1 probability distributions; point and interval 
nates for means and for proportions; one- and 
-sample tests for means and for proportions; 
iciples of experimental design. The class meets 
computer lab and emphasizes using the corn- 
er for analysis of data. We will design our own 
eriments, collect and analyze the data, and 
■ reports on our findings. Prerequisite: high 
3ol algebra. {M} 4 credits 
berine Halvorsen 
Led Fall 2002 

L Calculus I 

a of change, differential equations and their 

lerical solution, integration, differentiation, 

: the fundamental theorem of the calculus. The 

•ntific context of calculus is emphasized, and 

lputers are used in classes and laboratories. 

if 4 credits 

nbers of the Department 

sred both semesters each year 



112 Calculus II 

Applications of the integral, dynamical systems, 
infinite series, and approximation of functions. 
The scientific context of calculus is emphasized, 
and computers are used in classes and laborato- 
ries. Prerequisite: 1 1 1 or the equivalent. {M} 
4 credits 

Members of the Department 
Offered both semesters each year 

114 Calculus: Effective Computation and 
Power Series 

Power series and convergence, differential equa- 
tions, difference equations, dynamical systems: 
numerical methods and qualitative analysis. The 
scientific context of calculus is emphasized, and 
computers are used in classes and laboratories. 
Intended for students who have had a year of cal- 
culus elsewhere. Students may not receive credit 
for both 1 14 and 1 12. {M} 4 credits 
Members of the Department 
Offered both semesters each year 

153 Introduction to Discrete Mathematics 

An introduction to discrete (finite) mathematics 
with emphasis on the study of algorithms and on 
applications to mathematical modeling and com- 
puter science. Topics include sets, logic, graph 
theory, induction, recursion, counting, and combi- 
natorics. {M} 4 credits 
Members of the Department 
Offered both semesters each year 

200 Dialogues in Mathematics I 

This course gives students the opportunity to listen 
to, understand, discuss and write about various 
mathematical topics. The class will include lec- 
tures by students, faculty and visitors on a wide 
variety of topics. These lectures will be open to all 
students and faculty; other meetings are open only 
to students registered in the course. Required 
course work emphasizes writing. MTH 200 and 
MTH 300 meet together. Prerequisite: MTH 211 or 
212 or permission of the instructor. Potential math 
majors are encouraged to take this course early in 
their program. One of MTH 200 or MTH 300 may- 
be repeated once for credit. This course is graded 
satisfactory/unsatisfactory only. {M} 2 credits 
Mike Albertson 
Offered both semesters each year 



290 



Mathemal 



204 Differential Equations and Numerical 
Methods in Engineering 

An introduction to the computational tools used 
to solve mathematical and engineering problems 
such as error analysis, root finding, linear equa- 
tions, optimization, ordinary and partial differen- 
tial equations. Prerequisites: MTH 112 or MTH 
114 or permission of the instructor. {M} 4 credits 
PauAtela 
Offered Spring 2003 

211 Linear Algebra 

Vector spaces, matrices, linear transformations, 
systems of linear equations. Applications to be 
selected from differential equations, foundations 
of physics, geometry, and other topics. Prerequi- 
site: 112 or the equivalent, or 111 and 153; 153 is 
suggested. {M} 4 credits 
Christophe Gole, Yoonjin Lee, Fall 2002 
Mike Albertson, Leanne Robertson, Spring 2003 
Offered both semesters each year 

212 Calculus III 

Theory and applications of limits, derivatives, and 
integrals of functions of one, two and three vari- 
ables. Curves in two and three dimensional space, 
vector functions, double and triple integrals, polar, 
cylindrical, spherical coordinates. Path integration 
and Green's Theorem. Prerequisites: MTH 112 or 
MTH 1 14. It is suggested that MTH 2 1 1 be taken 
before or concurrently with MTH 212. {M} 
4 credits 

Christophe Gole, Fall 2002 
James Callahan, Spring 2003 
Offered both semesters each year 

222 Differential Equations 

Theory and applications of ordinary differential 

equations. Prerequisites: 211, and 212; 212 may 

be taken concurrently. {M} 4 credits 

PauAtela 

Offered Spring 2003 

225 Advanced Calculus 

Functions of several variables, vector fields, diver- 
gence and curl, critical point theory, implicit func- 
tions, transformations and their Jacobians, theory 
and applications of multiple integration, and the 
theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes. Prerequi- 



sites: 21 1 and 212, or permission of the instruc 
tor. {M} 4 credits 
James Callahan 
Offered Spring 2003 

227 Topics in Modern Mathematics 

Topic: Optimization Methods of Operations 

Research 

Operations Research applies mathematics to pn 

lems of management and engineering. This cou: 

will cover the formulation and solution of lineai 

programming problems, including sensitivity 

analysis and duality. Applications include such 

models as resource allocation and production 

planning. Network theory and probabilistic met] 

ods will be introduced briefly. Prerequistites: M' 

21 1 OR junior standing in engineering OR pern 

sion of the instructor. {M} 4 credits 

Ruth Haas 

Not offered in 2002-03 

233 An Introduction to Modern Algebra 

An introduction to the concepts of abstract alge 
bra, including groups, quotient groups, rings, a 
fields. Prerequisites: 112 or the equivalent, and 
211, or permission of the instructor. {M} 4 cre< 
Leanne Robertson 
Offered Fall 2002 

238 Topics in Number Theory 

Topic: The integers, prime numbers, 
congruences, Diophantine problems, 
arithmetical functions. 
Applications will be drawn from computing, cry 
tography, and coding theory. Prerequisite: 153, 
21 1, or permission of the instructor. {M} 4 crec 
Yoonjin Lee 
Offered Spring 2003 

243 Introduction to Analysis 

The topological structure of the real line, com- 
pactness, connectedness, functions, continuity, 
uniform continuity, sequences and series of fun( 
tions, uniform convergence, introduction to 
Lebesgue measure and integration. Prerequisite 
211 and 212, or permission of the instructor. {I 
4 credits 
David Cohen 
Offered Fall 2002 



Ihematics 



291 



5 Introduction to Probability and Statistics 

application-oriented introduction to statistical 
erence: descriptive statistics; random variables; 
lomial and normal probability distributions; 
npling distributions; point and interval esti- 
ies; standard parametric and nonparametric 
>othesis tests; type I and type II test errors; cor- 
ation; and regression. A wide variety of applica- 
is from the sciences and social sciences will be 
id. Classes meet for lecture/discussion and for a 
[uired laboratory. Laboratories emphasize com- 
er analysis of real data and a laboratory section 
)ffered for Biological Sciences majors. Prereq- 
ite: 1 1 1, or 153, or one year of high school 
cuius, or permission of the instructor. Lab sec- 
is limited to 24. {M} 4 credits 
Jberine Halvorsen, Stephen Tilley (Biological 
ences), Glenn Ellis (Engineering) 
ered Spring 2003 

6 Probability 

introduction to probability, including combina- 
ial probability, random variables, discrete and 
itinuous distributions. Prerequisites: 153 and 
I, or permission of the instructor. {M} 4 credits 
th Haas 
ered Fall 2002 

17 Statistics: Introduction to Regression 
iilysis 

'• analysis of data using linear models. Applica- 
nts of least squares theory including regression, 
(lysis of variance. Prerequisites: 211 and one of 
Mowing: 107, 245, ECO 190, SSC 190, PSY 
j, {M} 4 credits 
nerine Halvorsen 
bred Fall 2002 

I Combinatorics 

meration, including recurrence relations and 
rating functions. Special attention paid to 
>mial coefficients, Fibonacci numbers, Catalan 
Ibers, and Stirling numbers. Combinatorial 
gns, including Latin squares, finite projective 

lies Hadamard matrices and block designs. 

ftssary conditions and constructions. Error 

cecting codes. Applications. Prerequisites: 

.5 and 2 1 1 or permission of the instructor. {M} 

fredits 

VoHaas 

H-red Spring 2003 



270 Introduction to Numerical Methods 

Application of numerical methods to power series, 
roots of equations, simultaneous equations, nu- 
merical integration, and ordinary differential 
equations. Prerequisites: 211, and some knowl- 
edge of a computer language. {M} 4 credits 
Offered: to be determined 

300 Dialogues in Mathematics II 

This course gives students the opportunity to listen 
to, understand, discuss and write about various 
mathematical topics. The class will include lec- 
tures by students, faculty and visitors on a wide 
variety of topics. These lectures will be open to all 
students and faculty; other meetings are open only 
to students registered in the course. Required 
course work includes an oral presentation. MTH 
200 and MTH 300 meet together. Prerequisites: 
MTH 211, 212, 200 and two additional mathemat- 
ics courses at the 200 level, or permission of the 
instructor. One of MTH 200 or MTH 300 may be 
repeated once for credit. This course is graded 
satisfactory/unsatisfactory only. {M} 2 credits 
Mike Albertson 
Offered both semesters each year 

333 Topics in Abstract Algebra 

Topic: To be announced. Prerequisite: 233. {M} 
4 credits 

Leanne Robertson 
Offered Spring 2003 

342 Topics in Topology and Geometry 

Topic: To be announced. {M} 4 credits 
Patricia Sipe 
Offered Fall 2002 

343 Mathematical Analysis 

Introduction to Hilbert space and quantum logic. 
Hilbert space, function spaces and dual spaces, 
subspace lattices. We will see how abstract math- 
ematical structures can be used to model counter- 
intuitive logical systems, such as quantum physics. 
No background in physics is expected. {M} 
4 credits 
David Cohen 
Offered Spring 2002 

346 Seminar: Mathematical Statistics 

An introduction to the mathematical theory of 



292 



MathemaJ 



statistics and to the application of that theory to 
the real world. Topics include random variables, 
special distributions, introduction to the estima- 
tion of parameters and hypothesis testing. Prereq- 
uisites: 212 and 246. {M} 4 credits 
To be announced 
Offered Spring 2003 

353 Advanced Topics in Discrete Applied 
Mathematics 

Topic: Complexity Theory 
Good versus bad algorithms, easy versus intrac- 
table problems. The complexity classes P, NP and 
an investigation of NP-Completeness. The algo- 
rithms will be drawn from number theory, linear 
algebra, combinatorics and graph theory, and 
computer science. Alternates with MTH 364a. Pre- 
requisites: 211, 212, 253 or permission of the 
instructor. {M} 4 credits 
Michael Albertson 
Offered Fall 2002 

400 Special Studies 

By permission of the department, for majors who 
have had at least four semester courses at the in- 
termediate level. 1-4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 

Cross-Listed Courses 

CSC 250 Foundations of Computer Science 

PHI 202 Symbolic Logic 

PHI 203 Topics in Symbolic Logic 

PHI 220 Logic and the Undecidable 

PHY 211 Mathematical Methods of Physical 
Sciences and Engineering II 

QSK 101 Quantitative Skills 



The Major 



Advisers: Michael Albertson, Pau Atela, James 
Callahan, David Cohen, Christophe Gole, Ruth 
Haas, Katherine Halvorsen, James Henle, Leanne 
Robertson, Patricia Sipe. 



Adviser for Study Abroad: To be announced. 

Requirements: The Mathematics major has an 
entryway requirement, a colloquium requiremei 
and a total credit requirement. The entryway re- 
quirement consists of MTH 153, MTH 211, and 
MTH 212. An exceptionally well prepared studei 
might place out of some of these. The core re- 
quirement is one course in algebra (MTH 233 c 
MTH 238) and one course in analysis (MTH 22 
or MTH 243). The colloquium requirement is 
MTH 200 and MTH 300. Students wishing to coi 
centrate in statistics may substitute MTH 346 foi 
the algebra requirement. A concentration in stal 
tics consists of completing the four courses: MT 
245, MTH 246, MTH 247, and MTH 346. 

A total of 40 credits is required for the majo 
At most eight of these credits can be at the 100 
level. At most four credits can be counted from 
MTH 200 and MTH 300. With the approval of th 
department, up to eight credits can be replaced 
twice that number in courses from other depart 
ments or programs provided that such courses 
contain substantial mathematical content and th 
student completes a major or minor in the corr 
sponding department or program. To determine 
how much credit any course taken at another ir 
stitution can be counted towards her math majc 
a student should consult with her adviser. 

Normally, all courses that are counted towar 
either the major or minor must be taken for a 
letter grade. 

The Minor 

The minor in mathematics consists of 2 1 1 plus 
other credits selected from any one of the grou 
below. In the applied mathematics minor, four < 
the credits may be replaced by eight credits fro' 
the list in the description of major requirement 
found above or by other courses approved by tl 
department. 

Applied Mathematics Minor 

153, 204, 212, 222, 225, 233, 243, 245, 246, 
247, 254, 255, 264, 270, 325, 346, 353, 364, 
PHY211. 



athematics 



293 



iscrete Mathematics Minor 

13, 270, PHI 220, 233, 238, CSC 250, 254, 255, 
I, 353. 

Igebra-Analysis-Geometry Minor 

L »3, 212, 217, PHI 220, 224, 233, 238, 243, 325, 
3, 342, 343. 

[athematical Statistics Minor 

1 246, 247, 248, 346. 

•me courses, including topics courses and Spe- 
ll Studies, might fall into different groups in 
fferent years depending on the material covered. 

he Minor in Applied Statistics 

ie minor in applied statistics consists of 5 
oirses: MTH 111, MTH 245, MTH 247, MTH 248 
ID one (or more) from the following applica- 
>ns fields: BIO 260, PSY 303, SOC 203, ECON 
iO, MTH 246, MTH 346. 

jdents who have taken calculus or AP statistics 
high school will not have to repeat these 
•urses at Smith, but they will be expected to com- 
ete 5 statistics courses to satisfy the require- 
ents for the minor. Other courses might include 
her applications courses taken at the Five Col- 
ges. Approval for such courses may be granted 
the statistics minor advisor. 



[onors 



431 Thesis 
8 credits 
Offered each Fall 

432d Thesis 

12 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

Requirements: in addition to the credits required 
for the major, students must take 431 or 432d (for 
either eight or twelve credits) in the senior year. 

Directed reading, exposition, and a thesis. The 
topic of specialization should be chosen in consul- 
tation with the director during the junior year or at 
the beginning of the senior year. 

Examination: in addition to the requirements for 
the major, each honors student must take an oral 
examination in the area of her honors thesis. 



Graduate 



580 Special Studies in Topology and Analysis 
4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

581 Special Studies in Modern Geometry 
4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

582 Special Studies in Algebra 

4 credits 
Offered each Fall 



rector: Ruth Haas. 



JOd Thesis 

credits 

ill year course; Offered each year 



294 



Medieval Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Advisers and Members of the Medieval 
Studies Council 

*' Craig Davis, Professor of English Language and 

Literature 
*' Eglal Doss-Quinby, Professor of French Studies 
t 1 Alfonso Procaccini. Professor of Italian 

Language and Literature 
Joachim Stieber. Professor of History 
t 1 Nancy Mason Bradbury Associate Professor of 

English Language and Literature 



t J Brigitte Buettner, Associate Professor of Art. 

Director 
** : Eric Graf. Assistant Professor of Spanish and 

Portuguese 
Fiona Griffiths. Assistant Professor of History 
Mary B. Paddock, Assistant Professor of German 

Studies 
Vera Shevzov, Assistant Professor of Religion and 

Biblical Literature 



The interdepartmental major and minor in medi- 
eval studies provide students with an opportunity 
to study the civilization of medieval Europe from a 
multidisciplinary perspective. Subjects that belong 
today to separate academic disciplines were rarely 
so separated in the Middle Ages, and it is therefore 
appropriate that students be given an opportunity 
to bring these subjects together again. The great 
diversity of regional cultures in medieval Europe 
was balanced by a conscious attempt to hold to a 
unified view of the world that embraced religious 
and social ideals, Latin and vernacular literature, 
and music and the visual arts. 

The medieval studies major and minor provide 
students with an opportunity to re-create for them- 
selves, through courses in a variety of related dis- 
ciplines, an understanding of the unity and of the 
diversity of European civilization in the Middle 
Ages. The medieval studies major and minor are 
designed so that they can form valuable comple- 
ments to a major or minor in one of the participat- 
ing departments. 



The Major 



Basis: Two semester courses in different depart- 
ments, chosen from among the following: ART 
130: ENG 200: FRN 253; HST 22-i or 225; ITL 250: 



ed 



MUS 200; REL 1 10 (The Image and Body of 
Christ); SPX 250. IfLAT lOOd is taken, four a 
mav be counted toward the basis. 



Latin Requirement: All medieval studies major 
are expected to achieve a working knowledge of 
the Latin language. This requirement may be sati 
fled by taking at least one Latin course (for four 
credits) at the 200 level or above. If a student ha 
no prior Latin or is insufficiently prepared for a 
200-level course, she will take Latin lOOd (for 
eight credits) in order to fulfill this requirement. 
All students are urged to continue Latin until the 
have taken at least one course at the 200 level. 

Required Courses: A total of 8 semester course 
from the list of approved courses below, excludi 
the basis and the Latin requirement. A minimurn 
of two courses in medieval history are required. 
Normally, these should include HST 21+ and HS' 
225. one of which may be taken as part of the 
basis (four credits) or both of which (eight crec 
its) may be taken as part of the eight courses in 
the major (six distribution and two concentratic 
indicated below: 

1. Distribution: six courses at the 200 level or 
above, distributed in four areas as follows: 1 
medieval history (four credits); 2) medieval 
religion (four credits); 3) one course (four 



eval Studies 



295 



redits) in either medieval art or music; 4) two 
ourses (eight credits) in medieval language 
nd/or literature, not necessarily taken in the 
ime department: one course in classical Latin 
terature may be taken in fulfillment of this 
jquirement; and one other course (four cred- 
s) in any of the disciplines above. 
Dncentration: two additional courses, includ- 
ig at least one at the 300 level, must be taken 
i one of the four areas listed above. 

dition to courses listed below, courses that 
evoted to medieval material for at least eight 
s of the semester may be taken for credit in 
tajor, upon petition to the Medieval Studies 
cil, provided that the student's principal writ- 
ork deals with a medieval subject, 
udents are advised to consult the current Five 
ge Medieval Studies brochure when selecting 
courses. 

e Minor 

ilred Courses: Students who wish to qualify' 
minor in medieval studies have the option of 
mstrating a working knowledge of Latin as 
le major requirement or demonstrating a 
ing knowledge of one of the medieval ver- 
lars (these currently include ENG 216, ENG 
ENG 218, ITL 332, and SPN 250). Beyond the 
lage requirement, students must take four 
>es from the list of approved medieval studies 
>es at the 200 level or above: these courses 
include at least one course in history and 
:ourse in art or music. Students are encour- 
to select courses that deal with different as- 
of the same time period and comprise to- 
:r a meaningful examination of a segment of 
eval civilization. 



Comparative Literature 

279 Women Writers of the Middle Ages 
309 Arthurian Literature of the Middle Ages 



English 



302 Chaucer 

304 Studies in Medieval Literature 

Topic: The Gawain-Poet and Malory 

French 



253 


Medieval and Renaissance France 


391 


Women Writers of the Middle Ages 


History 


224 


The Early Medieval World, 300-900 


225 


The Making of the Medieval World, 




800-1350 


226 


The Social History of European 




Monasticism 


228 


Religious Women in Medieval Society 


230 


Europe from 1300 to 1530 and the 




Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy 


245 


The Middle Ages and the Renaissance in 




European Thought, 1750-1870 


290 


Outcasts: Minorities in Medieval Society 


291 


The Plague of Justinian and the Black 




Death 


294 


Lordship and Community in Europe, 




1300-1650 


325 


Early European History to 1300 


Italian 




332d 


Dante 


Latin 

213 


Virgil, Aeneid 



oved courses for 2002-04 are as follows: 



Music 

200 From Charlemagne to Bach 



Relics, Reliquaries, and Pilgrimage 
Early Medieval Aart 
Romanesque Art 



296 Medieval Stu 

Religion and Biblical Literature 

230 Christianity and Culture, I 

235 Jewish Spirituality: Philosophers and 

Mystics 
275 The Islamic Tradition 

Spanish and Portuguese 

2 50 Survey of Medieval Spanish Literature 

404 Special Studies 

Admission by permission of the instructor and the 

Medieval Studies Council. 

4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

408d Special Studies 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

Honors 

430d Thesis 

Admission by permission of the Medieval Studies 

Council. 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

Requirements: the same as those for the major, 
except that the thesis (eight credits) shall count as 
one course (four credits) in the area of concen- 
tration. The subject of the thesis should, prefer- 
ably, be determined during the second semester of 
the junior year. There shall be an oral examination 
on the thesis. 



297 



Music 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



ifessors 

Villiam Petrie Wittig, Mus.M. 
Peter Anthony Bloom, Ph.D. 
>onald Franklin Wheelock, M.Mus. 
n Porter Sessions, Mus.M. 
nard Jonathan Sherr, Ph.D., Chair 
I Monica Jakuc, M.S. 
lh.\mesSolie,Ph.D. 
'Kenneth Edward Fearn, Mus.M. 
I en Smith Emerson, M.M. 
le Brvden, M.M. 



Assistant Professors 

Grant Russell Moss, D.M.A. 
Steve Waksman, Ph.D. 

Lecturers 

Jonathan Hirsh, D.M.A. 
Pamela Getnick, M.M.A. 
Ron Gorevic 

Visiting Lecturer 

Deborah Gilwood, M.M. 



!>ociate Professors 

let Lyman Hill, M.A. 
Raphael Atlas, Ph.D. 
irgaret Sarkissian, Ph.D. 
ilPitchon, M.M. 



Teaching Fellows 

Julie Ayotte 
Ellen Exner 
Danny Holt 



: mption from introductory courses required for 
I major may be obtained on the basis of Ad- 
ced Placement or departmental examinations. 
Prospective majors are advised to take 1 10 and 
in the first year and 200 or 201 in the sopho- 
i re vear. 



Iitroductory Courses 

ID Colloquia 

iloquia are especially designed for those with no 
Jvious background in music. Limited to 20 stu- 
lits, they will emphasize class discussion and 
*tten work, which will be either music or critical 
) se as appropriate to the topic. Open to all stu- 
lits, but particularly recommended for first-year 
; ients and sophomores. 4 credits 

^damentals of Music 

^ introduction to music notation and to prin- 
les of musical organization, including scales, 
< s. rhythm, and meter. Limited to beginners and 



those who did not place into 1 10. {A} 
Raphael Atlas, Fall 2002 
RuthSolie, Spring 2003 
Offered both semesters each year 

Music, the Visual Arts, and the Media 
An introduction to the components of music and 
an exploration of the many and varied relation- 
ships that exist among music, painting, dance, 
theatre, film, and television. {A} 
William Wittig 
Offered Spring 2003 

The Art of Listening 

An introduction to music for audience members, 
dealing primarily with the standard classical reper- 
tory. How basic knowledge of composers, genres, 
and style periods — and the information conveyed 
on concert programs — can focus musical expec- 
tations and heighten understanding and enjoy- 
ment. Attendance at concerts will be stressed. {A} 
Ruth Solie 
Offered Fall 2002 



298 



Mi 



East Meets West: Mozart to World Beat 
This course explores the growth of cross-cultural 
contact in western art and popular music. We will 
examine 18th- and 19th-century musical stereo- 
types of an imagined Orient, the effects of in- 
creased contact with non-Western musics in the 
20th century, and the impact of Other musics on 
contemporary popular music (ranging from the 
Beatles' early exploration of Indian music to the 
recent "world beat" phenomenon) in order to 
consider issues of collaboration, appropriation, 
and musical colonialism. {A} 
Margaret Sarkissian 
Offered Fall 2002 

Music and Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective 
Using non-Western case studies as points of depar- 
ture, this course will explore the role of music in 
processes of socialization, segregation, and gen- 
der-based power relations. Although the readings 
will focus primarily on non-Western musics, con- 
temporary manifestations of American popular 
music culture will also be considered. {S/A} Wl 
Margaret Sarkissian 
Offered Spring 2003 



103 Sight-Singing 

Instruction and practice in singing intervals, 
rhythms, and melodies, in interpreting time an( 
key signatures, and in acquiring other aural ski 
essential to basic musicianship. Recommended 
background: a basic knowledge of pitch and 
rhythmic notation. Enrollment limited to 12. {A 
1 credit 

Pamela Getnick 
Offered Fall 2002 

105 Roll Over Beethoven: A History of Roc 

This course will provide a critical survey of roc 
music, tracing the music's development from 
blues and blackface minstrelsy to heavy metal, 
grunge, and techno. Emphasis throughout will 1 
placed upon understanding musical developme 
in the context of American race and gender rel; 
tions and the politics of youth cultures in the U. 
Topics to be covered include: Elvis Presley as n 
strel; Jimi Hendrix and the blues; women perfo 
ers in rock; heavy metal and masculinity; and tl 
(supposed) death of rock 'n' roll. {H/A} 4 ere 
Steve Waksman 
Offered Spring 2003 



Music and Identity in Hollywood Films, I960 to 

the Present 

The course will explore how music functions in 

selected major Hollywood films of the last four 

decades, focusing specifically on how it helps to 

construct gender and nationality. Introductions to 

the history of film music and to film criticism. 

Films studied will include Goldflnger, Star Wars, 

Top Gun, and Aladdin. 

RaphaelAtlas 

Offered Spring 2003 

101 Introduction to World Music 

A survey of selected musics, with an emphasis on 
interrelationships between music and society. Each 
unit will contain a general overview of the region, 
detailed study of one or more genres, and a dis- 
cussion of contemporary popular musics. {S} 
4 credits 

Margaret Sarkissian 
Offered Fall 2002 



PHY 107 Musical Sound 

110 Analysis and Repertory 

An introduction to formal analysis and tonal ha 
mony, and a study of familiar pieces in the stan 
dard musical repertory. Regular written exercis 
in harmony and critical prose. One hour of ear 
training per week outside of class. Prerequisite 
satisfactory performance on a placement test oi 
completion of Fundamentals of Music. {A} 
4 credits 

Ruth Solie, Donald Wheelock, Fall 2002 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

111 Analysis and Repertory 

A continuation of 1 10. Prerequisite: 1 10 or 
permission of the instructor. {A} 4 credits 
Donald Wheelock, Spring 2003 
Offered Spring 2003, Spring 2004 



299 



itermediate and Advanced 
ourses 

Topics in the History of Music 
itailed consideration of important periods, 
ires, and composers in the history of Western 
i;sic. 

1 Baroque Revolution, ca. 1580-1680 
rJie turn of the 17th century, musical style 
jinged radically and forever, and by the middle 

i hat century, most of the things that we now take 
! granted as aspects of "classical" music (vocal 
iires such as solo song, opera, and oratorio; 
^trumental genres such as the sonata and the 
,icerto; our modern system of notation and to- 
ity) were firmly established. The period also 
t issues of gender and eroticism appear in mu- 
iil discourse, as well as the first substantial body 
|.vorks by women composers. This course shall 
isider these topics with special attention to the 
f they are addressed in the works of figures 
|:h as Claudio Monteverdi, Francesca Caccini, 
•bara Strozzi, Girolamo Frescobaldi, Heinrich 
liitz, and others. Open to all students (including 
: t-year students) who have some previous musi- 
: experience or who have obtained the permis- 
m of the instructor. {H/A} 4 credits 
VhardSherr 
ered Fall 2002 

II Music from the Pre-Classic to the 
! st-Modern 

1 istorical survey of the principal styles and 
:numents of Western music from the time of 
K'dn and Mozart to the time of Stravinsky and 
: ond. Open to all students (including first- 
* rs) who have had previous musical experience 
:who have obtained permission of the instructor. 
[/A} 4 credits 
ler Bloom 
Cered Spring 2004 

J 6 Improvising History: The Development 
Uazz 

(* intermediate-level survey of jazz history. The 
( irse will combine exploration of jazz music with 
e imination of topics in the social and cultural 
t tory of jazz. Musically, the development of jazz 



will be traced from the early styles that took root 
in New Orleans and Chicago to the challenging 
"free jazz" sounds of the 1960s and the 1970s, 
and into the current "postmodern" moment of 
jazz history. Historically, the course will consider 
such issues as the key importance of race to the 
social development of jazz, the shifting status of 
jazz as "popular" or "art" music, and the nature 
and significance of improvisation as a medium of 
creative expression in twentieth century American 
culture. Some previous knowledge of African 
American music and history or permission of the 
instructor required. Enrollment limited to 40. (E) 
{H/A} 4 credits 
Steve Waksman 
Offered Fall 2002 

210 Advanced Tonal Analysis 

Advanced study of tonal music through analysis 

and composition. Prerequisite: 1 1 1 or permission 

of the instructor. Offered in alternate years. {A} 

4 credits 

To be announced 

Offered Spring 2004 

211 Tonal Counterpoint 

Principles of two- and three-part counterpoint 
with reference to such categories as the chorale 
prelude, invention, canon, and fugue. Ear training, 
analysis, and practice in contrapuntal writing. 
Prerequisite: 1 1 1 or permission of the instructor. 
Offered in alternate years. {A} 4 credits 
Raphael Atlas and Grant Moss 
Offered Spring 2003 

212 Analysis and Repertory: 20th Century 

Study of major developments in 20th-century mu- 
sic. Writing and analytic work including non-tonal 
harmonic practice, serial composition, and other 
musical techniques. Prerequisite: 1 1 1 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. {A} 4 credits 
RaphaelAtlas 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

220 Area Studies in Ethnomusicology 

4 credits 

East Asia 

An introduction to the musical cultures of China, 

Japan, and Korea. .After a preliminary overview of 



300 



Mu 



the region, selected solo, ensemble, and theatrical 
genres from each country will be examined. While 
no knowledge of Western music theory is re- 
quired, students will study some local forms of 
notation. {A} 
Margaret Sarkissian 
Offered Spring 2003 

Insular Southeast Asia 

This course focuses on the so-called "gong-chime 
cultures." Although there will be strong emphasis 
on the cultures and musics of Indonesia (espe- 
cially Java and Bali), other areas will be consid- 
ered as time permits. While no knowledge of West- 
ern music theory is required, students will study 
indigenous forms of musical notation and will gain 
practical experience of Central Javanese gamelan 
music. {A} 
Margaret Sarkissian 
Offered Spring 2004 

AAS 222 Introduction to African American 
Music: Gospel, Blues, Jazz 

233 Composition 

Basic techniques of composition, including 
melody, simple two-part writing, and instrumenta- 
tion. Analysis of representative literature. No previ- 
ous composition experience required. Prerequi- 
site: 1 10 or permission of the instructor. {A} 
4 credits 

Donald Wheelock 
Offered Fall 2002, Fall 2003 

235 Music and Technology 

An introduction to the use of technology in the 
notation, recording, research, and instruction in 
music. Though the course will contain a historical 
overview, and consider the broader implications of 
technology and music, it will primarily focus in a 
practical way on the following types of applica- 
tions: music editing and publishing; digital signal 
processing and sound editing; multimedia and 
instructional software; music on the World Wide 
Web. Enrollment limited to 8. Prerequisite: basic 
computer literacy; the ability to read music, and 
permission of the instructor. {A} 4 credits 
To be announced 
Offered Spring 2004 



251 The History of the Opera 

History of the form from its inception to the 
present, with emphasis on selected masterworkj 
{H/A} 4 credits 
Richard Sherr 
Offered Spring 2003 

303 Seminar in Music of the Renaissance 

Sacred and secular music in Western Europe du 
ing the 15th and 16th centuries. Prerequisite: p< 
mission of the instructor. {H/A} 4 credits 
Richard Sherr 
Offered Spring 2003 

308 Music in the Nineteenth Century 

After Beethoven. Did composers suffer the anxie 
of influence in the wake of Beethoven's symphoi 
achievement? This course will investigate what h 
been called the "crisis" of the symphony in the 
nineteenth century by considering from analytic; 
and historical points of view selected works of 
Schubert, Berlioz, Mendelssohn, Schumann, 
Brahms, and Mahler. Prerequisite: 201 or perm 
sion of the instructor. {H/A} 4 credits 
Peter Bloom 
Offered Spring 2004 

310 Seminar in Contemporary Music 

Schoenberg, Debussy, and the New Music. {A} 
4 credits 
John Sessions 
Offered Fall 2003 

325 Writing About Music 

An opportunity for intensive work on disciplinai 1 
writing, including prose style, tone, and mechari 
ics, in a workshop format. At the same time the 
class will study many genres of published writini 
on music — from daily journalism to academic i 
essays — covering a variety of musical repertori 
and performance contexts. Prerequisite: any 30' 
level course in music, or permission of the in- : 
structor. {A} 4 credits 
RuthSolie 
Offered Spring 2003 

AMS 341 Symposium in American Studies 

Making Sense of Sound: American Popular Muf 



301 



K Seminar in Composition 

■requisite: a course in composition. Admission 
liermission of the instructor. May be repeated 
■credit. {A} 4 credits 

mid Wheelock 

jred Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

Electro-Acoustic Music 

oduction to musique concrete, analog synthe- 
pjgital synthesis and sampling through practi- 
svork, assigned reading, and listening. Enroll- 
lt limited to eight. Admission by permission of 
nstructor. Prerequisites: a semester course in 
ic theory or composition and permission of 
instructor. Offered in alternate years. {A} 
edits 

liel Warner 
>red Fall 2002 

) Special Studies 

le history of music, world music, composition, 
i the theory or analysis of music. By permis- 
| of the Department, for juniors and seniors. 
4 credits 
) ;red both semesters each year 

[■aduate Courses 

tuirements for the master of arts degree in mu- 
ire listed on page 57 of the catalogue. 

graduate seminars are open to seniors by per- 
son of the instructor. 

I iser: Ruth Solie. 

!> Seminar in Contemporary Music 

i >ern and his successors. {A} 4 credits 

bi Sessions 

>;red Spring 2003, Spring 2004 

>i Special Studies 

* edits 

**red both semesters each year 

» »d Special Studies 

* edits 

F ' year course; Offered each year 
V 
5 I Research and Thesis 

* edits 

3 jred both semesters each year 



590d Research and Thesis 

8 credits 

Full year course; Offered each year 

Performance 

Admission to performance courses is determined 
by audition. To the extent that places in perfor- 
mance courses are available, students are accepted 
on the basis of musicianship, competence, and 
potential ability. There are fees for all courses in- 
volving individual instruction. 

When no instructor for a particular instrument 
is available at Smith College, or when no place is 
available on the roster of a Smith College perfor- 
mance instructor, every effort will be made to pro- 
vide qualified students with qualified instructors 
from the Five College community. Such arrange- 
ments may require Smith students to travel to other 
valley colleges. 

Courses in performance normally require one 
hour of individual instruction per week. Students 
taking four-credit courses for the year in perfor- 
mance are expected to practice a minimum of one 
hour a day; those taking eight-credit courses for the 
year in performance, two hours a day. Two perfor- 
mance courses may not be taken concurrently with- 
out permission of the department. This restriction 
does not apply to chamber music or conducting. 

First- and second-year courses in performance 
must be taken above a regular program — that is, 
eight four-credit courses per year — and are 
counted as four-credit courses for the year. Excep- 
tion: a sophomore who plans a music major may; 
with the permission of the Department, elect the 
second-year course in performance within a 32- 
credit program for eight credits for the year. 

Third- and fourth-year courses in performance 
may be taken within a regular program as an eight- 
credit course for the year, with the permission of 
the instructor, or above a regular program as ei- 
ther an eight-credit or a four-credit course for the 
year. While all performance students are urged 
concomitantly to study music in the classroom, 
those who wish to continue individual instruction 
beyond the first- and second-year courses must 
take either Fundamentals of Music (Music 100), 
or 1 10 and either Music 200 or 201 during their 
years at Smith College. It is recommended that 
these courses be taken prior to the junior vear. 



302 



M 



A minimum grade of B or permission of the 
instructor is required for admission to courses in 
performance beyond the first year of study. 

No more than 24 credits earned in courses in 
performance may be counted toward graduation. 

Auditions must be scheduled with the secretary of 
the department upon arrival on campus. Singers, 
pianists, and other instrumentalists will be ex- 
pected to perform one or more works of their 
own choice. Courses in organ are not normally 
open to first-year students, but those who demon- 
strate proficiency in piano may receive permission 
to register for organ in the first year. 

Registration for performance courses takes 
place at the department office (as well as with the 
Registrar), and is tentative until audition results 
are posted. 

Undergraduate performance courses carry the 
following numbering sequence, credits, and sec- 
tion letters: 

9l4d {A} 4 credits, first year of performance 
study 

924d {A} 4 credits, second year of performance 
study 

928d {A} 8 credits, music majors in second year 
of performance study who, with their 
teacher's permission, wish to study for 
full credit. Prerequisite: MUS 9l4d. 

930d {A} Advanced level for variable credit (4 or 
8 credits). Can be repeated once. Pre- 
requisite: MUS 924d or 928d. 

950d {A} Graduate level for variable credit (4 or 
8 credits). Can be repeated once. No 
prerequisite. 



A 


Piano 


B 


Organ 


C 


Harpsichord 


D 


Voice 


E 


Violin 


F 


Viola 


G 


Violoncello 


H 


Double Bass 


1 


Viola da Gamba 


J 


Flute 


K 


Recorder 


L 


Oboe 


M 


Clarinet 


N 


Bassoon 



French Horn 

P Trumpet 

Q Trombone 

R Tuba 

S Percussion 

T Guitar 

U Lute 

V Harp 

W Other Instruments 

Piano. Monica Jakuc, Kenneth Fearn, Debon 
Gilwood. 

Organ. Prerequisite: piano 9l4d or the equiva 
lent. Grant Moss. 

Harpsichord. Prerequisite: piano 9l4d or per- 
mission of the instructor. Grant Moss. 



Voice. Karen Smith Emerson, Jane Bryden. 

V\o\m. Janet Hill Joel Pitchon. 

Viola. Janet Hill 

Violoncello./o/w Sessions. 

Double bass. (UMass). 

Viola da Gamba. Alice Robbins. 






Wind Instruments. William Wittig, flute; Kar 
Hosmer, oboe; Lynn Sussman, clarinet; (UMa 
bassoon; Emily Samuels, recorder. 

Brass Instruments. (UMass). 

Percussion. (UMass). 

Guitar. Phillip de Fremery (Mount Holyoke). 

Lute. Robert Castellano. 

Other Instruments. 

901 Music Ensembles 



Chamber Music Ensemble 
Open on a limited basis to qualified students vj 
are studying their instruments. This course re-' 
quires a one-hour lesson and three hours of p: 
tice per week. May be repeated. Permission oiy 
instructor required. {A} 
1 credit 

Janet Hill Joel Pitchon, Members of the 
Department 
Offered both semesters each year 



1C 



303 



\ Conducting 

)n technique, score reading, problems of con- 
ting choral and instrumental ensembles. Ability 
ad bass and treble clef required. May be re- 
ted for credit. Admission by permission of the 
ructor. {A} 2 credits 
tela Get nick 
?red Spring 2003 

\ Topics in Piano 

; course is designed for students of intermedi- 
evel interested in a more generalized ap- 
ich to the study of piano. It will combine class- 
I work with private or semi-private study and 
integrate performance with readings, listening, 
written work. Permission of the instructor 
aired. Enrollment limited to 8. {A} 4 credits 
ineth Fearn 
-red Fall 2002 



aduate Performance 



burses 

iluate performance courses carry the following 
nbering sequence, credits, and section letters: 

'd {A} Graduate level for variable credit (4 or 
8 credits). Can be repeated once. No 
prerequisite. 

I same principles, conventions, and section 
\ rs apply to graduate performance courses as 
indergraduate performance courses. 



10 


Viola 


an 


Violoncello 


psichord 


Viola da Gamba 


<:e 


Wind Instruments 


in 


Other Instruments 



pith College Orchestra 

mphony orchestra open to Smith students, 
i -College students, and community members. 
I orchestra gives one concert each semester 
i performs at annual events such as POPS!, Au- 
Jn Serenade, and Christmas Vespers. Rehears- 
bn Tuesday evenings. 
^ithanHirsh, Conductor 



Smith College Gamelan 
Ensemble 

One concert each semester. Open (subject to 

available positions) to Smith students, students at 

the other four colleges, faculty, and staff. No prior 

experience necessary. Rehearsals on Wednesday 

evenings. 

Sum